Extreme Bedroom Makeover

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Joe Gowac

Jerry Novick

Steve Rioux

Shelley Shabenas

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Current Issues/Trends in Mathematics (EDU 532)

Dr. Hari P. Koirala

June 9, 2004

 


Table of Contents

 

Content                                                                                                   Page

            Concept Map                                                                                                               2

Unifying Theme                                                                                                 3

Assumptions                                                                                                                 3

Grade Level                                                                                                                 3

Mathematical topics to be covered                                                                                3

Required resources                                                                                                       4

Unit Features                                                                                                                4

Tentative Timeline                                                                                                         5

Unit objectives and the standards alignment                                                                   6

Introduction                                                                                                                  7

Lesson Connections                                                                                                      7

Featured Lesson                                                                                                           12

Worksheets / Activities                                                                                     14

 Lesson Connections (Continued)                                                                                  18

Appendix                                                                                                                     21

Bibliography                                                                                                                 25

Unifying Theme

The theme of this unit is to redesign their bedroom.  The unit will encourage students to develop an understanding of the measurable attributes of objects, explore the processes of measurement, and solve real-world problems through organization and mathematical reasoning.

Assumptions

It is assumed students have used rulers and measured in the U.S. Customary system. They can measure objects to the nearest quarter inch, are able to find the perimeter of rectangles, and have been introduced to computer programs such as Word and Excel.  However, it is not necessary that students have mastery of these skills to be successful in this unit.

 

Grade Level (s):  3-5

This unit is designed for a fourth grade class.  However, it can easily modified to accommodate students in grades 2 through 8.  This project could also be designed to be an independent project for students in grades 9 through 12.

 

Mathematical topics to be covered

Estimation and rounding                                                            Ratios and Scales

Decimals and fractions                                                  Measurement

Designing blueprints                                                                    -  Area

Problem solving                                                                          -  Perimeter

Geometry                                                                                   -  Time

Spatial / Proportional Reasoning                                                  - U.S. Customary Units

 

 

Required Resources

Lesson 1:                      Television with VCR, Word Processor (optional)

Lesson 2:                      Rulers and Yardsticks

Lesson 3:                      Graph paper and Rulers

Lesson 4:                      Fraction Kits, Virtual Manipulatives (i.e. www.visualfractions.com)

Lesson 5, 6, & 7:          Geoboards

Lesson 8:                      Graph paper and Rulers

Lesson 9:                      Calculators

Lesson 10:                    Computers with a spreadsheets program, such as Excel

Lesson 11:                    Computers and Internet access

 

 

Unit Features

Self-reflection of one’s character

Spatial Reasoning

Review of geometric shapes

Collecting and organizing data

Prioritizing one’s materialistic needs

Research the responsibilities of owning a pet

Encourages problem solving

Combining measurements and using fractions

Discussing the concept of area

Creating a personal schedule

Purchasing items while maintaining a budget

 

 

Tentative timeline

This unit will take at least three weeks to complete.  However, it is likely to take four weeks to complete.  Each lesson will be 40 to 50 minutes long.  This unit may be taught in conjunction with a language arts assessment and a science assessment. 

 

Lesson 1: Write a letter and include the dimensions in your room.

Lesson 2:  Measure objects to the nearest quarter-inch.

Lesson 3:  Read blueprints to find actual measurements of design.

Lesson 4:  Add fractions with unlike denominators of 2, 4, and 8.

Lesson 5: Perimeter

Lesson 6: Area

Lesson 7: Area (cont.)

Lesson 8: Create a blueprint

Lesson 9: Creating a budget (Featured Lesson)

Lesson 10:  Graphing

Lesson 11:  Finding a pet

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Unit Objectives and the standards alignment

At the end of this unit the students will be able to:

Unit Objectives

NCTM Standards

Connecticut Standards

 

1.  Determine reasonable estimates of lengths and areas and describe, in writing, the strategy used to make the estimate.

 

Measurement

Reasoning and Proof

Numbers & Operations

 

Geometry

 

Measurement

Estimation and Approximation

Number Sense

Operations

Spatial Relations and   Geometry

 

 

2.  Measure lengths to the nearest quarter-inch.

 

Numbers & Operations

Measurement

 

 

Number Sense

Measurement

 

3. Read a blueprint and convert a scale size to its actual size (within the same system).

 

 

Numbers & Operations

Geometry

Measurement

Problem Solving

Connections

 

 

Number Sense

Operations

Spatial Relations

Measurement

Discrete Mathematics

 

4.  Add fractions with like and unlike denominators (such as, 2, 4, and 8).

 

Numbers & Operations

Measurement

Number Sense

Operations

5.  Determine the perimeter of certain objects in a room.

 

Numbers & Operations

Measurement

Number Sense

Operations

6.   Solve multi-step word problems involving area and purchasing from an ordering catalog.

 

Numbers & Operations

 

Problem Solving

Connections

 

Number Sense

Operations

Discrete Mathematics

7.  Find the area of composite figures.

 

 

Numbers & Operations

 

Geometry

Measurement

Problem Solving

Number Sense

Operations

Spatial Relationships and Geometry

Measurement

Discrete Mathematics

8.  Create a model representation of their room using an appropriate scale.

 

Representation

Algebra

Ratios, Proportions, and Percents

Algebra and Functions

 

Unit Objectives

 

NCTM Standards

 

 

Connecticut Standards

 

 

 9a.   Use estimation and logical reasoning to allocate and budget their money appropriately.

9b.  Create a budget and allocate appropriate amount of monies to each category.

9c.  Perform all operations on decimals

 

Number & Operations

 

Problem Solving

 

Reasoning and Proof

Number Sense

Operations

Estimation and Approximation

Discrete Mathematics

10. Students will create a bar graph to represent the proportions in their budget.

 

Data Analysis & Probability

Numbers & Operations

Communication

 

Probability and Statistics

Ratios, Proportions & Percents

Estimation and Approximation

11. Add different measurements of weight and determine appropriate amount of food needed to feed a pet for a

            different period of time.

Number & Operations

 

Measurements

 

Problem Solving

Number Sense

Operations

Estimation and Approximation

Measurement

Ratios, Proportions & Percents

Discrete Mathematics

 

National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, (2000),

Connecticut State Department of Education, (1999).

Introduction

            Our unit is designed to give students a purpose to use mathematical reasoning and make connections with other disciplines.  We expect students to be able to communicate mathematically through written language and through the use of visual aids.  Our featured lesson in this unit will be lesson nine.  This lesson will also illustrate possible modifications for the gifted and talented as well as those with special needs.

Lesson Connections

 In our first lesson the students are shown the introduction portion of the hit ABC series, Extreme Home Makeover.  The reality TV based program remodels the homes of deserving families.  The program begins by showing the audience a video request that families submit to ABC in order to be considered for a makeover.  After the students see the introduction part of the program, they will then create a letter describing why they deserve an “Extreme Bedroom Makeover.”  First, students will be shown a sample letter to give them an idea of what is expected from them.  Students will then be given a writing prompt (see Appendix A) to help organize their thoughts.  Students must include a personal reflection of their character and personality. They must also include a detailed description of the dimensions of their room.  They need to be as accurate as possible and then justify how they determined their estimates.  The intent of this activity to have students use items of known measurement, such as a doorway (six feet) or their bed (six feet) and create spatial relations in their room.  Students will be asked, “How will the reader visualize your room?  How can you estimate the dimensions of your room?  Do you know the length of any object, such as a bed or doorway, which may be used as a point of reference?  Do you know any geometric vocabulary that will help specifically describes objects in the room?” 

Stimulating interest in student learning is a major goal of this unit.  Lesson 1 will directly relate to lessons 6, 7, and 8.  The essay will serve as a pre-assessment for understanding of area and perimeter.  It will be expected for students to give the dimensions of their floor but not the square units of their rug on the floor.  As a homework assignment, students will find all appropriate measurements of objects in their room in order to create a blueprint of their room.  After viewing the show at the beginning of the unit, the students will also be shown sample blueprints (see Appendix B and C) to aid how they may want their personal blueprint to be designed.  Students however may have trouble rounding to the nearest quarter-inch.

Lesson 2 will focus on assessing student’s ability to measure objects to the nearest eighth of an inch.  However, they will only be assessed on measuring to the nearest quarter-inch.  After this lesson students will self-evaluate the accuracy of their bedroom measurements from the night before.  Students will then discuss the strategies they used to determine the estimates they made of their bedroom in their essay.  Students will be encouraged to share their frustrations by responding to these questions.  “Was there any object that was difficult to find an accurate measurement for?  How did you determine what was important to measure?”  These discussions will encourage students to compare their actual measurements and their estimates on their letter.  Students may then make any necessary adjustment to their actual bedroom measurements they made the previous night.

Lesson 3 involves reading blueprints.  Students have had experiences reading scales from a map.  We will build on this previous learned information to include its uses in math class thus forming connections.  Students will need an understanding of adding fractions and experience with working with area.  These concepts will explore in lessons 5, 6, 7, and 8.  In lesson 3, students will read a blueprint (see Appendix C) and discuss how the designer represents doors, windows, closets, and the lengths of walls on the scale model.  Students will be asked, “Does the design look realistic? Is it proportional?  What does proportional mean? How did he make the drawing proportional to the actual size?  What mathematical skills do you think the designer used?”  These questions are intended to create a purpose for learning new skills from the following lessons. 

In lesson 4, students will begin to get familiarized with fractions with unlike denominators. They will need this skill in order to combine some of the measurements they collected from their room.  After given an introduction to adding fractions with unlike detonators, students will then be asked questions dealing with adding fractions that relate to their new bedroom.  Some of the questions could be, “If one-half of your room was painted red, and one-eighth was painted blue, how much of your room is painted?” Another question you could ask is, “If your closet is 6 1/8 feet wide and you make it 1 ½ foot wider, what will be the new width of your renovated closet?”  For added practice you can have your students spend some time working with fractions kits for a more hands on approach to see how fractions are added or even try visual manipulatives on the World Wide Web.  Web sites like www.visualfractions.com offer and interactive approach to working with fractions and offer a new strategy to helping your students learn the important task of adding fractions.

Before students actually draw their blueprints, they will investigate the concepts of perimeter and area in lessons 5, 6, and 7.  In these lessons students will use Geoboards to assist them in their explorations.  Students will begin by discussing perimeter.  Students will be asked, “Create a polygon that has a perimeter of twenty.”  We will then display them by the board and begin discussing designs.  It is expected that students will count twenty pegs, thus not having a perimeter of twenty.  We can review geometry concepts and vocabulary by having students create objects with specific characteristics.  The instruction will then lead students to try and communicate how one describes the area of an object.   Area and perimeter use two different forms of units to describe their measurement.  Students can take those experiences and begin discussing the area of the floor of their bedroom.  Students may then design their blueprints on graph paper.  The use of graph paper is intended to bridge to the Geoboard activity to real-world applications, therefore making the connections more probable.  To modify this for early grades or special needs students and to incorporate technology into this lesson, the students can visit http://www.iknowthat.com/com/L3?Area=BluePrints&COOK= . Here they can click on interactive blueprints that have the measurements marked out for them and they have to figure out the area and perimeter. It’s a great site that presents area and perimeter in a way that may help special needs students who are having trouble grasping this concept.

In lesson 8 the students will design a blueprint. They will discuss how they will choose an appropriate scale to make the blueprint.  This is very challenging for many students.  For example, if a student chooses 1 ft = 1in, and the dimension of their actual room is 15' by 12' the blueprint design will not fit on a standard piece of paper.  Some students will choose a scale that will create a blueprint that is too small.  They will be asked questions such as, “How big should our paper be?  What estimations need to be made in order to decide on an appropriate scale?  Should we use the metric system or the U.S. Customary system? Why?”  Students will then discuss their ideas with one another and justify their reasons verbally.  As an enrichment activity, this lesson can be modified to discover different strategies that can be used to solve ratios and determine if certain proportions are true.  This enrichment can also include the use of decimals within the proportions.  Students in the fourth grade typically do not see numbers with decimals in the numerator and in the denominator of a fraction.  Students can also use a calculator to explore the patterns used to test if a proportion is equal. As a modification for remedial students, they will be given a set scale to use. If the child is not developmentally ready to evaluate and synthesize proportional reasoning they should at least be given an opportunity to apply proportional reasoning strategies.  Students will be given a scale such as 1' = 3/4", using this set scale students can begin designing their blueprints.  

Our featured lesson, lesson nine, teaches students the mathematical concepts and operations shown in the table above by means of another practical application: how to calculate a budget.  From this point, students will focus on the second phase of the unit, which deals with projecting costs and purchasing materials for their bedroom.  Our lesson plan for  Creating a Budget” begins on the following page.  The next few lessons will cover important mathematical topics such as currency, estimation, graphing, and problem solving.  Lesson connections will continue on page 18.

 

 

 


Lesson 9

Creating a Budget

Grade 4

Standards Alignment: This lesson aligns with most of the NCTM and Connecticut standards listed previously in the unit objectives.

Required Resources: Calculator, “The Task” Activity Sheet, “Specialty Designs For Less” Price List and Order Form, and Mathematical Design Sheet (questions 1-10).

Lesson Assumptions: Students will have been working on this unit already and will be involved in the last few lessons of the unit.  The unit was introduced through the use of the “Extreme Bedroom Makeover, Student Prompt” sheet.  It is assumed that students will have a good understanding of area and perimeter and how to measure them before starting the lesson.  Students should also have a general knowledge of common U.S. customary measurements. 

Objectives: At the end of this lesson, the students will be able to:

a)      Create a bedroom design on a fixed budget of $500. (Appendix 4)

b)      Use the area and perimeter of the room to purchase items in their bedroom design.

c)      Use the “Specialty Designs For Less” Order Form to list purchases and the amount spent (see attached).

Lesson Procedure: The teacher will initiate the lesson by distributing and explaining “The Task” (see Activity Sheet) to students.  Approximately 15-20 minutes of lesson time will be spent discussing the budget activity while permitting any student questions.  After that, each student will receive the “Specialty Design for Less” Price List as well as the corresponding “Order Form” (all activity sheets shown on the next few pages).

            Students will first select their bedroom’s design theme (ie. safari, cars, disco, etc.).  This will be the basis for all items ordered.  Students will use their own personal experiences and imaginations to select the desired look for their new bedroom.  The teacher will direct students’ attention to the price list in which he or she must carefully guide students through their understanding.  Students will need to have a good understanding of area and perimeter to be able to complete the order form. 

            At this point in the lesson, students would use the price list to complete their order.  Students are reminded that their price list must include a bed and their total should not exceed the $500 spending limit, including shipping charges.  Calculators will be made available for students in this activity.  For this activity, students will be applying many mathematical skills such as estimation, mental imagery, problem solving, logical reasoning, numeration, and measurement.  It is expected that they will modify and adjust their price lists accordingly in order to comply with the given budget. 

Moreover, students will be making applications to real-life situations.  This lesson will connect to science where students will be researching a pet using various resources such as the Internet and nonfiction expository texts. 

Lesson Assessment: When the teacher is listening to student discourse and observing students’ progression through the budgeting activity, he or she will continuously monitor and evaluate the thinking processes of all students.  Furthermore, the teacher and students will be evaluating themselves when they compare their work to the scoring rubric. This assessment process involves both the teacher and students engaging in reflection of the learning process.

 

 

 

Specialty Designs For Less

We get what you want at a price you can afford!

**All items are custom made, please specify colors and pattern on order form. 

If you can dream it, we can make it!

Wall Designs

Border

 

Specify design choice.  Each roll covers a length of 5 yards.

$12.50 per roll

Paint

 

Specify Color.

 

$12.95 per gallon.

Decals

 

Your design choice, as set of 10.  Self-Sticking.

Specify Design.

$14.95 per set.

Beds

Twin Bed-

Basic Bed

 

$100.00

Specialty Twin Bed

Built the way you want (Car shape, etc…) Please specify on order form.

$150.00

All twin beds are

5’6” x 3”

Bedspreads/

Comforters

Twin size bedspreads – any color or design.

$55.25

Twin size comforter – any color or design.

$55.25

Twin size dust ruffle – any color.

$25.00

Furniture

 

Chairs

Small (2’ x 2’) – color of your choice.

$175.00

 

Desk Chair

$75.00

Desk (4’ x 2’) – 3 drawer, color of your choice.

$75.00

 

Bookcase (1’ x 3’)

$75.00

Chest of drawers

(3’ x 2’) – 4 drawers

$125.00

 

Dresser (4’ x 4’) –

3 small drawers, 4 large

$200.00

Extras

Color TV Sets

25” - $250.00

36” – 350.00

 

Stereos

Basic – with AM/FM

$100.00

 

With AM/FM & CD Player

$200.00

 

Deluxe – With AM/FM, CD, & Large Speakers

$350.00

Lamps

Lava Lamps

Blue, red, or green

$15.95

 

Specialty Lamp

Your design.

$50.00

 

Desk Lamp

$25.00

 

Disco Ball –with lights

$40.00

Car Track

$45.00

 

Train Track

$45.00

 

Aquarium – Includes

Everything!

$75.00

 

Reptile Tank – with heater and lamp.

$50.00

Extras

Clock – Digital

Specify design choice.

$45.00

 

Computer System

$100.00

With Printer.

$150.00

Telephone

Specify design choice.

$50.00

Specialty Designs For Less

Order Form

Name: _____________________

Shipping Address: ____________________

                      ____________________

 

Item

Product Description & Color/Design Specifications

Price

Quantity

Total

 

 

 

$

 

$

 

 

 

$

 

$

 

 

 

$

 

$

 

 

 

$

 

$

 

 

 

$

 

$

 

 

 

$

 

$

 

 

 

$

 

$

 

 

 

$

 

$

 

***********

***********

SUBTOTAL

$

 

***********

***********

SHIPPING

CHARGES

$

 

***********

***********

TOTAL

$

**Please use additional order forms if needed**

Shipping Charges:

$0.00 - $49.99…….$2.99

$50.00 - $199.99…….$5.99

$200.00 - $399.99…….$8.99

$400.00 and up…….$10.99

 

Extreme Bedroom Makeover

Mathematical Designs Sheet

 

Designer’s Name___________________________________________

 

1. What are the dimensions of your dream bedroom?
________________________________________________________________

2. What is the AREA of your dream bedroom?
________________________________________________________________

3. What is the PERIMETER of your dream
bedroom? ________________________________________________________

4. How many feet of border would you need for your
dream bedroom?
________________________________________________________________
5.
How many yards? (3ft in one yard)
________________________________________________________________

6. How much carpeting would you need for your
bedroom? ________________________________________________________

7. How many gallons of paint would you estimate
you would need for your dream bedroom? 
________________________________________________________________

8. Assume your bedroom has 7ft. high ceilings. 
What is the area of each wall? 
________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________
What is the total area of your walls? 
________________________________________________________________

9. If one gallon of paint covers 300 sq. ft.,
how many gallons will you need for your room?
________________________________________________________________

10. The dimensions of a twin bed are 5'6 x 3', what is the area?
________________________________________________________________

 

 

 

 

Extreme Bedroom Makeover “Dream Room”
Scoring Rubric

 

Outstanding

Doing Good

Needs Some Work

Unsatisfactory

Perimeter

The perimeter is correctly drawn for a room with dimensions of: ___________
4 points

The perimeter is within one foot of the correct dimensions.
3 points

The perimeter is within 2-3 feet of the correct dimensions.
2 points

The perimeter is more than 3 feet off of the correct dimensions.
1 point

Furniture

Furniture sizes are drawn correctly and labeled with item names.
4 points

Furniture sizes are drawn correctly, but some are labeled.
3 points

Furniture is only drawn, but not labeled, or vice versa.
2 points

Drawings are unclear, or the furniture is so packed it would be impossible to walk through the room.
1 point

Letter to Parent

The letter is written in proper format and follows the assignment.
4 points

The letter has a few minor format errors and stays on topic for the assignment.
3 points

The letter has distracting errors in format. The letter does not stay on topic for the assignment.
2 points

The letter does not follow letter format. The topic of the letter does not follow the assignment.
1 point

Spelling

The letter has no spelling errors.
4 points

The letter has 1-3 spelling errors.
3 points

The letter has 4-6 spelling errors.
2 points

The letter has more than 6 errors.
1 point

Grammar

The letter has no grammar errors.
4 points

The letter has 1-3 grammar errors.
3 points

The letter has 4-6 grammar errors.
2 points

The letter has more than 6 errors.
1 point

Sentence Structure

The letter has no errors in sentence structure.
4 points

The letter has 1-3 sentence structure errors.
3 points

The letter has 4-6 errors in sentence structure.
2 points

The letter has more than 6 errors in sentence structure.
1 point

Name: ______________________________

Total Points: ________/24

Teacher Comments:

Lesson Connections (Continued):

Lesson Nine: Modified Version (Early Elementary Gr. 1-2)

 Students can be given a list of items that that they need to buy like a television, dresser, phone, alarm clock, etc. Next they will be given some weekly flyers, a catalog, or a couple websites and asked to purchase the items that are required to buy. The only drawback is that they are only allowed to spend a certain amount of money.  This will introduce students in the early grades to the concept of budgeting. They can then be asked,  What did you consider before purchasing an item? Why did you spend more on one item and less on another?  Were you able to get everything you wanted?  Did you go over budget and why do you think you did?  Have you ever had to budget before in real life?”  When the students realize that they have had to budget before or think about if they have had enough money for anything they make a connection to how math like this is important and used in the real world, hence covering some of the connections sections under the national standards for mathematics.  Also other national standards covered in lesson would be numbers and operations and problem solving.  As an enrichment activity, technology could be brought in for higher grades.  For example, students will first be told what they have to buy for their brand new bedroom and how much they have to spend. After getting an introduction to Microsoft Excel they will then enter in their estimated prices of what they estimate each item will cost or what they think they can afford.  After entering their estimated prices they will graph it with Excel showing the percentages that make up their total amount they have to spend.  They can then be asked questions such as, “Based on your estimations do you think you will be under budget, over, or right on?”  “What considerations did you make when deciding on how much you wanted to spend on and item?  By asking questions and bringing discussion into the classroom you will then be covering the communications section of the National Standards for Mathematics. Through the graphing you will cover the data analysis section.

 

Lesson ten will deal with incorporating technology into the unit by having students use computers to graph their budget.  Through the use of Microsoft Excel the students will enter in each item that they purchased (TV, paint, DVD player, rugs, etc) and how much that item(s) cost them. After that is finished the students will find the percentage each item represents out of the total amount spent. The students will have already had a background on division and finding percents before this unit is used.  However, a tutorial will be given to show how to convert their data into bar graphs or pie charts in excel, it will be their choice on how they want to present their budget visually.

Lesson eleven, which is the final lesson of the unit, is a continuation of using computer and incorporating Internet navigation.  The student and or students will have the opportunity to get a new pet for their brand new bedroom.  Through the use of searching on the internet the student will be required to not only find a pet but write a report on what family it is part of, the things it eats, characteristics, how small or large it grows to be, what type of climate or region is it mostly found in, how they plan to take care of it and why they chose this pet. To incorporate mathematics into this lesson you can have the students find out what the pet eats and how much. Next, ask them to research how much the pet food costs and based on how much the pet eats, what will they pay for pet food a day, in a week, a month, and a year. They can even figure out how much visits to a vet would cost and how much they would spend on vet visits in a month or year. For special needs students or students in earlier grades (1-2) you can incorporate math by making up world problems about the pet they chose. For example, student A chooses to have a pet tiger. You can ask simplified questions like,  If your pet tiger got loose and met up with another pet tiger, how many legs would there be total?”  Answer: 4 tiger legs + 4 tiger legs = 8 legs or “How many tails would they have?”

 

 

Unit Assessment:  Students’ assessment will be an ongoing process throughout the entire unit.  Students will compile a collection of their best work and place it in a portfolio.    Students will include their letter, blueprint, order form, graphs, and pet choice. At any point in the unit a student may resubmit previously corrected work.  Students will then present their new bedrooms to the class in a short five-minute oral report.  The total score will be based on a combination of completed work, presentation, participation, and their oral report.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Appendix A

 

 

“The Task”

Dream – What kind of theme will your bedroom have?

     Today is the day for you to get your creative juices flowing!  What kind of bedroom design theme will you choose…Tye Dye…Cars…Safari?  What colors will you choose…Blue…Red… Purple?  The choices are endless, so you need to decide on a theme for your “Extreme Bedroom Makeover.”  You might want to make a list of your ideas.  Once you have decided on your theme and have sharpened your math design skills, you will need to complete the order form using the “Specialty Designs For Less” Price List so you will be ready to go shopping tomorrow to purchase your supplies.   Using your mathematical design abilities, you must come up with items needed to complete your dream bedroom on a budget of $500.  Your purchase must include a bed.  Don’t forget to include shipping charges and do not exceed the $500 spending limit.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Appendix B

 


Appendix C

 

 

Scale: 1ft. = 3/4 inch

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Appendix D

 

Specialty Designs For Less:  Sample Design

Order Form

Name: Student A

Shipping Address: 81 White Birch Rd, East Hampton, CT 06424

 

Item

Product Description & Color/Design Specifications

Price

Quantity

Total

Paint

Red

 

$ 12.95

2

$ 25.90

Beds

Twin Bed

 

$ 100.00

1

$ 100.00

Bedspreads

Twin Size

 

$ 55.25

1

$ 55.25

Furniture

Bookcase

 

$ 75.00

1

$ 75.00

Extras

Stereo-Basio

 

$ 100.00

1

$ 100.00

Extras

Aquarium

 

$ 75.00

1

$ 75.00

Extras

Telephone

 

$ 50.00

1

$ 50.00

 

 

 

$

 

$

 

***********

***********

SUBTOTAL

$  481.15

 

***********

***********

SHIPPING

CHARGES

$    10.99

 

***********

***********

TOTAL

$  492. 14

**Please use additional order forms if needed**

Shipping Charges:

$0.00 - $49.99…….$2.99

$50.00 - $199.99…….$5.99

$200.00 - $399.99…….$8.99

$400.00 and up…….$10.99

 

 

References

National Council of Teachers of Mathematics.  (2000).  Principles and standards for school mathematics.  Reston, VA.

Connecticut State Department of Education.  (1999).  A guide to K-12 program development in mathematics.  Hartford, CT.