2 Psychology Students Accepted to Present at National and International Conferences

Jolene Potter will present research entitled A comparison of the effect of sexual assault micro-interventions on rape myth acceptance and empathy at the annual meeting of the Association for Psychological Science in San Francisco in May 2018 (with Dr. Kristalyn Salters-Pedneault). APS is the 3 largest psychological association in the world and hosts one of the largest conferences in the discipline. 

Malvina Pietrzykowski will present research entitled Evaluating effects of signals on risky choice in pigeons and humans at the annual meeting of the Association for Behavior Analysis International in San Diego in May 2018 (with Dr. James Diller)

Biology Student Wins Thoresen Scholarship to Present Research

This semester’s winner of the Thoresen Scholarship is Lauren Atkinson (BIO), whose project Evaluating the Scorpion Microbiome for Antibiotic Production will be presented at the 2018 New England Science Symposium. Her project was supervised by Barbara Murdoch (BIO).

Each semester, ECSU-AAUP considers proposals for scholarship monies to support student research or creative projects and presenting that work at conferences. If you have a student who is conducting research or completing a creative project, please ensure that they meet the qualifications for the scholarship and provide them with guidance on submitting the strongest possible application for this scholarship. In particular, students need to use the money for research or creative project purposes (either conducting a project, or travel to present that project at conferences), coherently convey the project goals and the significance of their work, provide a feasible project plan with a timeline, and present a detailed, accurate budget of expenses in order to be considered.

6 Business Students to Present at Northeast Decision Sciences Institute Conference

The students below (Mentor: Dr. Pakdil) have been accepted to present their project at the 47th NEDSI Annual Conference to be held in Providence, RI between 4/12 and 4/14. The conference “features presentations of original research papers; Ph.D. and new faculty development seminars; a placement service; case writing; and other interesting innovations in the fields of Accounting; Business Education; Finance; HRM; Management; Marketing; MIS/DSS/Expert Systems and IT; Organizational Behavior; Operations Management; Strategic Management; and Supply Chain Management, among others. Awards for “Best Paper” in several categories are given each year. ” Below are the 2 student abstracts:

The students Arthur Gifford,’19/BUS Kyle Bulmer,’19/BUIS and Ryan Vaillancourt,’20/ECON worked on Lead Time Reduction through Raw Material Planning for a large-scaled manufacturing firm in BUS 260 Operations Management course. The team analyzed a big data set including historical data collected from the business processes by the firm. ABC analysis (an inventory categorization technique) was simply implemented to categorize the raw material. Using ABC analysis, the team categorized more than 30 thousands items kept in the inventory. The results of the project were implemented in decision making processes.

In this undergraduate research project by Shelby Donovan, Aggie Grant and Kristy Merrifield, the team aimed to improve a local restaurant’s menu, considering several decision making criterions. In this process the team concentrated only on the food menu. The motivation to renew the food menu was to minimize the menu to only the most popular selling items and few staples that the restaurant is known for. Analyzing menu will allow them to highlight the most profitable items and increase the restaurant’s bottom line. This could open up room for new possible items without adding too many options to their vast menu options. In this project, we focused on eight menu engineering models proposed in the literature. All models presented in this project can be very useful in evaluating existing menu items and reconstructing menu. With careful analysis of restaurant’s food costs, menu item prices, contribution margins, item’s profitability and popularity, the identification of items that contribute to more profit helped figure out how to renew the menu in this local restaurant.

Performing Arts Students Place at Kennedy Center American College Theatre Festival

Eastern’s Performing Arts Department’s fall 2017 production, Thread City, has received a total of three merit awards.  This production was directed Alycia Bright-Holland and Kristen Morgan.  The creative team of this production, which included several students and faculty member Anya Sokolovskaya who created costumes and adjunct faculty members Travis Houldcroft and Jen Rock, received merit awards in the categories of Conceptual Collaboration, Excellence in Original Music Composition, and Exceptional Choreography.  Ted Clement, the KCACTF Regional Festival Co-Chair, attended this production last fall. He has said that Thread City was the very best, most visually spectacular, and most moving production he had seen in all of the many college productions throughout New England and New York he has seen this year.

Director David Pellegrini’s Spring 2017 production of Two Gentlemen of Verona also received three awards.  ECSU student Troi Barnham received a merit award for her coordination and staging of the fashion show scene of this production, student Hannah Garrahy received a merit award for her work regarding the production’s Live Feed Videography and Commercial, and student Sinque Tavares received a merit award for his work as Assistant Choreographer and Lead Dancer.

Meanwhile here at the festival, Student Keri McColgan has advanced to the final round in the Design Tech & Management Exhibition Competition for her design and construction of a stage winch and Kat Mazzacaine has advanced to the final round in the festival’s Stage Manager Fellowship Competition.  Student actor, Nathan Cusson has been castin a Ten-Minute Plays production.  The rest of us here at the festival have been most actively been attending  workshops and performances. 

Kerri McColgan won a one week scholarship at the Stage Craft Institute of Las Vegas for her hand operated alligator winch project and Thread City Stage Manger Katerina Mazzacaine won another of these 1200 dollar scholarships for her presentation on her experiences in Thread City as well as for her service in the festival’s Stage Management Fellowship program.  Zach Parisella and Rebecca Figuereo both served as Technical Interns here at the festival and also competed in the festival’s Technical Olympics.

41 Students Accepted to Present at the National Conference on Undergraduate Research

We received notifications from NCUR that all but 2 of our submissions were accepted. For the first time, we are sending a performance and art for the exhibition. We also have a wide range of departments represented. Below is a complete list of presentations:

Title Type Subject Submitter Name Other Presenters
HIDDEN REALITY  Exhibit Visual Arts Sabrina Aragon  
WILL THERE BE ENOUGH WATER TO SUSTAIN DEVELOPMENT? Poster Environmental Studies  Tara Brooks  
THE RHETORIC OF U.S. FOREIGN AID TO PALESTINE Oral Political Science Harrison Brooks  
MELANCHOLY MUSIC: PERFORMERS’ APPROACH TO MENTALLY UNSTABLE ROMANTIC COMPOSERS AND THEIR WORKS Performing  Music Performance Hannah Bythrow  
DETERMINING THE DISTRIBUTIONAL EFFECTS OF THE REGIONAL GREENHOUSE GAS INITIATIVE Poster Economics Tess Candler  
MEDIA INFLUENCES ON MENTAL ILLNESS STIGMA Poster Psychology Mandi Charette  
DEVELOPING 3-DIMENSIONAL PHOTOGRAMMETRY MODELS OF JURASSIC CONGLOMERATES IN CENTRAL CT Poster Geography & Earth Sciences Jennifer Croteau  
WHERE HAVE ALL THE GOOD STUDENTS GONE? Oral Geography & Earth Sciences Luke Davis  
IS ARSENIC CONCENTRATING IN YOUR WATER? Oral Geography & Earth Sciences Luke Davis  
INVESTIGATING ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE PATHOLOGY: THE EFFECTS OF REDUCED ASTROCYTE BECLIN 1 ON RETROMER TRAFFICKING AND RECEPTOR-MEDIATED PHAGOCYTOSIS Poster Cell & Molecular Biology Yuberki Delgadillo  
HOW OPTIMISM EFFECTS STRESS RESPONSE AND ABILITY TO MULTITASK Poster Psychology Nathan Edwards Edwards  
THE USE OF NON-DRUG THERAPIES TO TREAT CHRONIC PAIN AMONG CANCER PATIENTS Poster Health Sciences  Ashley Franklin  
THE EFFECT OF CAMPUS ALCOHOL POLICIES AND STRESS ON COLLEGE BINGE DRINKING Poster Communications Alex Gabriele  
BEYOND THE MOTHER-TEACHER: HOW TEACHING BECAME WOMEN’S WORK Oral English Nicole Green  
SLEEP HYGIENE, PSYCHOLOGICAL DISTRESS, AND ACCEPTABILITY OF SLEEP HYGIENE PRACTICES IN COLLEGE STUDENTS Oral Psychology Elizabeth Hilton  
PTSD: RISK FACTORS AND DAILY FUNCTIONING IN A UKRAINIAN SAMPLE Poster Psychology Elizabeth Hilton Tyler Musial, Madison Dalton, Riley Arkema
CHILDHOOD POVERTY AND EDUCATIONAL OUTCOMES: CASE STUDIES OF INDIA, ETHIOPIA, PERU, AND VIETNAM Oral Economics Phillip Hoeps  
STATE CRIMINAL JUSTICE POLICY: DEVELOPING INDICES OF PUNITIVENESS AND REHABILITATION EFFORTS Poster Political Science Demitra Kourtzidis  
LEARNING WITHOUT AWARENESS Poster Psychology Yohan Krumov  
THREAD CITY MOMENT WORK Performing  Theatre/Drama Julia Leitao  
CLEAN LATTICE TETRAHEDRA Oral Mathematics Thomas Luckner  
SWIPE RIGHT!: ONLINE DATING AND COLLEGE STUDENTS Poster Communications Hayley Mangan  
THE FIREFIGHTER PROBLEM: CONTAINING FIRES ON GRIDS Oral Mathematics Emily Menendez  
MISSING MARIMBA: THE USE OF THE MARIMBA IN THE HIGH SCHOOLS OF MASSACHUSETTS AND CONNECTICUT Oral Music Emily Miclon  
JUVENILISM: A NEW THEORETICAL PERSPECTIVE ON THE ORIGINS AND MECHANICS OF CONTEMPORARY LITERARY PORTRAYALS OF ABUSED CHILDREN Oral English Christopher Morris  
A PROFESSOR’S EXPERIENCE IN INDONESIA: EXAMINING THE PARTNERSHIP BETWEEN UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY AND BOGOR AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 1957-1966 Oral History Adam Murphy  
KOREAN SAMUL NORI Performing  Music Performance Hannah Nilsson Joshua Perry, Noah Lerch, Antonia Reynolds
PICTURE THIS: AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURAL REPRESENTATION IN CHILDREN’S LITERATURE Oral English Lindsay Pattavina  
PHYSIOLOGICAL MEASURES OF EMPATHY PAIN IMPLICATING MIRROR NEURON ACTIVITY AND GENDER DIFFERENCES IN SELF-REPORTED EMPATHY Poster Psychology Malvina Pietrzykowski  
THE EFFECTS OF AFFECTION EXCHANGE & RELATIONSHIPS Poster Communications Noah Pinho  
A COMPARISON OF THE EFFECT OF SEXUAL ASSAULT MICRO-INTERVENTIONS ON RAPE MYTH ACCEPTANCE AND EMPATHY Oral Psychology Jolene Potter  
ETHICAL ISSUES CONCERNING CONSENT OF DIVERSE SEX DEVELOPMENT SURGERIES Oral Health Sciences  Mariana Serrano  
FOREST OF ETERNAL LIGHT  Exhibit Visual Arts Ashley Shumbo  
THE SOCIAL IMPACT OF THE DEVELOPMENT AND DECLINE OF STREETCARS IN HARTFORD, 1900-1950. Oral History Andrea Slater  
WHITE NOISE & WHITE SUPREMACY: THE INTERSECTION OF NATIONALISM & MUSIC VIA DONALD TRUMP’S TWEETS Oral Music Jesse Steinmetz  
COMMUNICATION IN CROSS-SEX FRIENDSHIP: CAN MEN AND WOMEN BE “JUST FRIENDS?” Poster Communications Kimberly Tallard  
FIXED ASSET TRACKING IN NON-PROFIT HEALTH CARE Oral Business/Finance/Accounting Koren Thomas  
WOMEN, STRIKES, AND THE EARLY LABOR MOVEMENT: AN EXPLORATION OF UNION STRATEGY 1870-1910 Oral Business/Finance/Accounting Julia Underhill  
OPENING WORLDS: A HISTORICAL OVERVIEW OF THE SPECIAL OLYMPICS OF CONNECTICUT Oral Sport Management Mackenzie Walker  
OCULUS RIFT VIRTUAL REALITY- COMPARISON OF PRE-TEST VS. POST-TEST PSYCHOLOGICAL RESPONSES Oral Kinesiology & Exercise  Kyle Wilson  
STATISTICAL PROCESS ANALYSIS IN A RESTAURANT Poster Business/Finance/Accounting Jimmy Yuen  

 

 

 

 

 

 

First University Summer Research Institutes Selected

The Undergraduate Research & Creative Activity Council in conjunction with the University Retention Committee is pleased to announce the funding of 3 Summer Research & Creative Activity Summer Institutes.  According  to CUR, scaffolding research/creative activity throughout the curriculum is a key component of Excellence in Undergraduate Research (UGR). Departments will shortly begin to identify promising and/or high achieving Freshman and Sophomore students (outside of the Honors Program) and 1 or 2 students who could benefit from the institutes (under-represented groups or transfer students) and deliver invitations to apply to the institutes. Institutes will introduce students to research in various areas while focusing on impacting Critical/Creative Thinking, Quantitative Reasoning or Writing.  Each department would then be responsible for selecting students who will participate. Students who are selected to participate will receive all necessary supples/materials, will receive a stipend for the week and a food allowance. Below are the details on the 3 Institutes:

Dr. Kristen Morgan & Travis Houldcroft (New Media Studies) will run their institute titled “Performance Capture for Entertainment” between 5/14 and 5/18. In this Summer Research & Creative Activity Institutes, students will learn how to set up and operate the OptiTrack motion capture system, participate in an overview of Motive software, and receive hands-on instruction in exporting data to Blender or other rendering software. In addition to the detailed study of mo-cap to digital rendering, students will also be introduced to the fundamentals of animation post-production, such as an introduction to character visual design, voice-over recording for animation, and the use of diegetic sound in an animated environment. Students will write a two-character storyline and produce a short film using performance capture data and digital tools learned at the beginning of the week. 

Dr. Megan Heenehan (Math) and Garrett Dancik (Computer Science) will hold an institute between June 4th and 8th titled “Network Analysis of Character Interactions in Movies.” The goal of the proposed institute is to enable a student to perform a network analysis of character interactions in a movie, in order to evaluate a hypothesis about the movie’s social structure. For example, network analysis could be used to identify “important” characters and relationships, different communities, or how character relationships are associated with additional features, such as gender. A recent article in the journal Math Horizons (Beveridge and Shan 2016}, used network science to analyze the relationships between characters in Game of Thrones by George R. R. Martin. By analyzing the text of A Storm of Swords using network science the authors were able to identify influential characters and different communities. The authors found that, overall, Tyrion Lannister is the most important character, while other characters are influential in their communities

Dr. Allison Speicher (English) will run an institute titled “Introduction to Literary Scholarship: Provocative Pairings.” This research institute will help students discover the answer to that question for themselves by focusing on two major techniques upon which literature scholars rely to craft meaningful arguments: connecting works of literature to other works of literature and art and applying secondary sources. This workshop will push students to make thought-provoking pairings, to select a single work of literature and put it in conversation with a variety of other texts, in order to ultimately propose a valid research project that arises from these intertextual analyses. Students will focus their individual research on the literary texts of their choice, as the aim of this workshop is to help students develop skills in research and analysis that they can employ in a wide range of contexts. 

Students Receive Awards for Research

 

Catherine Falvey (Mentor: Dr. Heenehan) was recognized at the Joint Mathematics Meeting held in San Diego, CA from January 10-13. Her poster with a co-author titled “Enumerating 2 x 2 and 3 x3 Matrices over Z” was in the top 15% in the Algebra category as an Outstanding poster. 

Malvina Pietrzkowski (Mentor: Dr. Letterman) received a Library Research Award for he project titled “The Neuropsychological Effects of Religion and Spirituality.” Her abstract reads: “This literature review critically analyzes psychological and medical research regarding religion and spirituality. The paper begins with analyses of religion’s psychological and social appeal, as well as comparison of different types of religion. Various aspects of neuropsychology are covered, including religion’s influence on functions of the brain.”

Students Publish Research

Stefanie Dominguez (Mentor:  Dr. Trawick-Smith), has just learned that an article, based on her honors thesis research, has been accepted for publication in a very highly-ranked, refereed journal, The Early Childhood Education Journal. Her investigation, “A qualitative study of the play of dual language learners in preschool,” is one of the first to document the social interactions of very low English proficiency preschoolers.

Rachel M. Scrivano (Mentor: Dr. Jenna Scisco) published her research titled “The Impact of Applicants’ Weight and Education About Obesity on Applicant Ratings” in the Psi Chi Journal of Psychological Research. Below is the abstract:

Obese women may be discriminated against based on their appearance, especially during the hiring process (Agerström & Rooth, 2011). However, previous research has suggested that an education intervention can reduce obesity bias. The present study sought to reduce obesity bias by providing brief education about uncontrollable causes of obesity. Participants (N = 166) were randomly assigned into 1 of 6 conditions where they viewed a voice-over PowerPoint presentation by either an obese or non-obese candidate whose job talk focused on research about controllable causes of obesity, uncontrollable causes of obesity, or a control presentation on sleep and memory. Then, participants completed measures of implicit obesity bias, explicit beliefs about the controllability of obesity, hiring decisions, and impressions of the candidate. Results indicated that participants rated the obese candidate as more likely to accept the job offer than the non-obese candidate, p = .009. Additionally, professor roles (e.g., approachability) were evaluated significantly more favorably for the obese candidate than the non-obese candidate, p = .001. Further, education about the controllable causes of obesity (e.g., diet) led to significantly higher explicit beliefs about obesity controllability than the control, p = .006, and marginally higher than the uncontrollable causes presentation, p = .084. These findings suggest that obese female candidates may be perceived more favorably on select characteristics than non-obese female candidates, and that brief education focusing on controllable causes of obesity may increase explicit beliefs about the controllability of obesity.