Department of Psychology

Text Only Version
  Psychology Day 2013
An undergraduate research conference in psychology

Psychology Day 2013 was held on the campus of Eastern Connecticut State University on Thursday, May 2, 2013 in the Science Building. A big thank you to all the presenters, faculty, and assistants!

Conference Schedule:

12:00 - 1:15   Registration/
Poster Set-Up
  Science Building First Floor
 
1:15 - 1:30   Opening Remarks   Science Building Room 104
 
1:30 - 2:15   Oral Presentations   Science Building Room 104
 
2:15 - 3:00   Keynote Address   Science Building Room 104
 
3:00 - 4:00   Poster Session   Science Building First-Floor Hallway
 
4:00 - 4:45   Topical Breakout Sessions &
Light Refreshments
  Graduate School (students) - Science 301
Honors Program Creation (faculty) - Science 114
Technology in the Classroom (faculty) - Science 104
 
4:45 - 5:00   Presenter Award Ceremony   Science Building Room 104


Keynote Address:

Shifting Age Horizons: Opportunities for Theory, Research, and Practice
Joann M. Montepare
(PhD, Brandeis University) is a Professor of Social-Developmental Psychology at Lasell College and Director of the Rosemary B. Fuss Center for Research on Aging and Intergenerational Studies. Her research has explored a range of lifespan issues, drawing particular attention to age-related social perceptions and self-perceptions of age. She is an advocate of intergenerational teaching and learning and recently launched the "Talk of Ages" program at Lasell College which brings together individuals across diverse ages around topics of common interest. She has published extensively in social, developmental, and aging journals, and serves on the editorial boards of the International Journal of Aging and Human Development, the Journal of Adult Development, and the Journal of Nonverbal Behavior.

Oral Presentations:

  1. Judah Butler and Aaron Radden, Effects of Racial Comedy and Anxiety on Prejudiced Attitudes, Central Connecticut State University (Faculty Mentors: Marisa Mealy and Marianne Fallon)

    For this study, we hypothesized that White individuals with high levels of intergroup anxiety would report higher levels of prejudice after exposure to comedy targeting members of the same race. Findings showed a significant interaction between target race and anxiety. After being exposed to a comedian making fun of a White target, participants with high intergroup anxiety reported higher levels of prejudice. However, participants in the same situation, who had low levels of intergroup anxiety, reported lower levels of prejudice.

  2. Taylor Scalia, The Correlational Study of Humor Styles and Perception of Trust on Romantic Relationship Satisfaction, Eastern Connecticut State University (Faculty Mentor: Wendi Everton)

    Couples use humor as an effective communication skill to enhance the good and bad times. Trust is also an important quality in a relationship because each partner needs to be able to rely on one another. Fifty-four participants that are in a committed, romantic relationship were collected from a college campus. Participants answered three questionnaires to express their opinions about their relationships. Correlations were computed to determine the association between humor styles and relationship quality and perception of trust and relationship quality. The data supports a significant correlation between a couple's perception of trust and higher relationship satisfaction scores.

  3. Jacqueline Turcios and Laura Beltran, Patterns of gaze to speaking faces in children with autism spectrum disorders, Southern Connecticut State University (Faculty Mentors: Lawrence Brancazio and Julia Irwin)

    Using eye tracking methodology, we observed gaze to a speaking face in 10 children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and 10 typically developing controls (TD). Partipants were exposed to three different conditions: a speaker's face and voice (audiovisual or AV) speech in auditory noise, visual only (lipreading) speech, and AV non-face, non-speech control condition. Children with ASD looked less to the face overall, and less to the mouth of the speaker as opposed to TD children. The groups did not differ in gaze to the non-speech control.

Poster Award Winners:

  • Christopher Brown, Katherine E. Chesanek, Adam Stryjewski, & Julian Finnegan, Media Exposure and Hypermasculinity: An Exploratory Study, Central Connecticut State University (Faculty Mentors: Jason F. Sikorski and Steven Horowitz)

  • Eric Cerino, Exploring Academic Motivation and Self-Efficacy's Relationship to Academic Procrastination, Eastern Connecticut State University (Faculty Mentor: Kristalyn Salters-Pedneault)

  • D. M. Quartermane, Erika Lindgren, Tyler Brown, & Alicia Prigodich, The Effects of Disfluency on Comprehension, Southern Connecticut State University (Faculty Mentor: Patricia Kahlbaugh)

Poster Presentations
  1. Rachel Schaedler, Examining the Relations between Social Anxiety Disorder, Coping Styles, and Alcohol Use Disorders, Eastern Connecticut State University (Faculty Mentor: James Diller) Abstract

  2. Isaiah Roby, A Review of Psychosurgery, Eastern Connecticut State University (Faculty Mentor: Margaret Letterman) Abstract

  3. Ariel Dupont, Gender Differences in Face-to-Face Social Interaction and Social Networking Site Use, Eastern Connecticut State University (Faculty Mentor: Peter Bachiochi) Abstract

  4. Shannon Glenn, Optimism and Social Support as Predictors of Relationship Closeness, Eastern Connecticut State University (Faculty Mentor: Peter Bachiochi) Abstract

  5. Melissa Groccia, Effects of Violent Media on Self-Esteem and Aggression, Eastern Connecticut State University (Faculty Mentor: James Diller) Abstract

  6. Kristina Bradley, Mood Disorders in Mothers Linked with Anxiety and Depression in Children, Central Connecticut State University (Faculty Mentor: William Disch) Abstract

  7. Michael Spodick, Nicole Morin, and Jamie Iannotti, Effects of Self Monitoring Levels and Pressure on Conformity, Southern Connecticut State University (Faculty Mentor: Patricia Kahlbaugh) Abstract

  8. Kathleen Croke, All Things Specific Phobia and the Validity of the Current Classification System, Central Connecticut State University (Faculty Mentor: Carolyn Fallahi) Abstract

  9. Kathleen Croke, Internal Locus of Control and Marijuana Use in College Students, Central Connecticut State University (Faculty Mentor: William Disch) Abstract

  10. Randi Jo Barton, Gender Differences, Openness, and Attitudes towards Disabled People, Eastern Connecticut State University (Faculty Mentor: Kristalyn Salters-Pedneault) Abstract

  11. Taylor Martinez, Self Esteem and Attachment Style as Correlates of Relationship Satisfaction, Eastern Connecticut State University (Faculty Mentor: Alita Cousins) Abstract

  12. Colleen Gomola, Relationship between Exercise, Working Memory, and Processing Speed in College Students, Eastern Connecticut State University (Faculty Mentor: Wendi Everton) Abstract

  13. Cristina Lauria, The Relationships Among Media Exposure and Attitudes on Romanticism and Unrequited Love, Central Connecticut State University (Faculty Mentor: William Disch) Abstract

  14. Brittany Gladden, Weather or Not: Relationships between Weather, Weather Reactivity, Mood, Locus of Control, and Prosocial Behavior, Central Connecticut State University (Faculty Mentor: Marianne Fallon) Abstract

  15. Courtney Taylor, Campus Involvement, Residency, and Academic Success in College Students, Central Connecticut State University (Faculty Mentor: Marianne Fallon) Abstract

  16. Magen Anderson, Tweeting for the World to See: Narcissism and Twitter Use, Central Connecticut State University (Faculty Mentor: William Disch) Abstract

  17. Paulina Cwalinski, The Effect of Attitudes toward Sexuality on Sexual Health Communication, Central Connecticut State University (Faculty Mentor: Steven Horowitz) Abstract

  18. Rachel Kulscar, The Relationship of Parental Authority and Alcohol Usage on Anxiety, Eastern Connecticut State University (Faculty Mentor: Kristalyn Salters-Pedneault) Abstract

  19. Julian Finnegan, The Hundred Year Mystery of Childhood Disintegrative Disorder, Central Connecticut State University (Faculty Mentor: Carolyn Fallahi) Abstract

  20. Mary Mahon, How Stress Affects College Students Grade Point Averages, Central Connecticut State University (Faculty Mentor: Steven Horowitz) Abstract

  21. Chelsea Myers, The relationship of Orthodox Christianity, Sexual Attitudes, and Guilt Proneness, Eastern Connecticut State University (Faculty Mentor: Alita Cousins) Abstract

  22. Stephanie MacLaren, Extraversion, Agreeableness and Perceived Attraction of Online Dating Profiles, Eastern Connecticut State University (Faculty Mentor: Alita Cousins) Abstract

  23. Cassandra Hilerio, Parental Marital Status: Estimating Optimism About the Likelihood of Marriage, Central Connecticut State University (Faculty Mentor: Steven Horowitz) Abstract

  24. Roxanne Campbell, Memory Across the Lifespan, Eastern Connecticut State University (Faculty Mentor: Lyndsey Lanagan-Leitzel) Abstract

  25. Ruslan Abdukalikov, Relationship Between Stress Level, Coping Styles and Depression in Undergraduate University Students, Eastern Connecticut State University (Faculty Mentor: Kristalyn Salters-Pedneault) Abstract

  26. Kristen Vitelli and Ashley Anderson, Effect of Depleted Central Executive Function on Passive Cheating, Central Connecticut State University (Faculty Mentor: Marianne Fallon) Abstract

  27. Julian Finnegan, Katherine Chesanek, Adam Stryjewski, and Christopher G. Brown, Defragmenting Hypermasculinity: The search for more homogenous subgroups, Central Connecticut State University (Faculty Mentor: Jason F. Sikorski) Abstract

  28. Carlos Marrero, Dance Movement Therapy: Decreased Stress in College Students, Central Connecticut State University (Faculty Mentor: Marianne Fallon) Abstract

  29. James Bachand, The Effects of Stereotype Threat on Female Math Performance, Central Connecticut State University (Faculty Mentor: Steven Horowitz) Abstract

  30. Monica Concas, How Technology Use Relates to Social Anxiety, Eastern Connecticut State University (Faculty Mentor: Kristalyn Salters-Pedneault) Abstract

  31. Alyssa Patenaude, Difficulties in Diagnosing Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Central Connecticut State University (Faculty Mentor: Carolyn R. Fallahi) Abstract

  32. Kelsea Burkhardt, Personality and Relationship Status, Eastern Connecticut State University (Faculty Mentor: Kristalyn Salters-Pedneault) Abstract

  33. Colin Whiston, The Great Depression: A Review of Current Evolutionary Theories Explaining the Potential Utility of Depression, Eastern Connecticut State University (Faculty Mentor: Alita Cousins) Abstract

  34. Margaret Daher and Courtney Lausier, Delayed Discounting and Ego Depletion: Effects on Food Choices, Southern Connecticut State University (Faculty Mentor: Patricia Kahlbaugh) Abstract

  35. Patricia Spak, Effects of Temperature Perception and Work Ethic on Task-Switching, Central Connecticut State University (Faculty Mentor: Marianne Fallon) Abstract

  36. Brittany Graff, Caffeine on Working Memory, Eastern Connecticut State University (Faculty Mentor: Alita Cousins) Abstract

  37. Melissa Symolon, The Effects of Popular Culture on Child and Adolescent Development, Eastern Connecticut State University (Faculty Mentor: Melanie Evans) Abstract

  38. Shamille K. Ellison, Bereavement: Consequences for those in romantic relationships, Central Connecticut State University (Faculty Mentor: William B. Disch) Abstract

  39. Sam Loprete, Reading Comprehension and Music, Central Connecticut State University (Faculty Mentor: Marianne Fallon) Abstract

  40. Ellen Swol, Narcissism, Use of Social Media, and how they relate to Self-Esteem, Eastern Connecticut State University (Faculty Mentor: James Diller) Abstract

  41. Marcelina Pyzik, Ethnic Identity and Spirituality: Influences on Levels of Happiness, Central Connecticut State University (Faculty Mentor: William B. Disch) Abstract

  42. Jaclyn Vancour, Sexual Behavior, Sexual Satisfaction, and Relationship Satisfaction in College Students, Central Connecticut State University (Faculty Mentor: Marianne Fallon) Abstract

  43. Agnieszka Samsel, Gender differences in attitudes towards traditional and cyberbullying, Central Connecticut State University (Faculty Mentor: Steven Horowitz) Abstract

  44. Nick Santo and Jim Lahti, Immunohistochemistry Protocol Optimization: A Methods Experiment, Southern Connecticut State University (Faculty Mentor: Kelly A. Bordner) Abstract

  45. Elizabeth DeConto, The Relationship Between Religion and Happiness, Eastern Connecticut State University (Faculty Mentor: Kristalyn Salters-Pedneault) Abstract

  46. Michael Cole III, Examining Optimism and Locus of Control as Predictors of Coping Styles, Eastern Connecticut State University (Faculty Mentor: Kristalyn Salters-Pedneault) Abstract

  47. Shelby Reig, College Residential Status on Alcohol Motivations and Academics, Central Connecticut State University (Faculty Mentor: William Disch) Abstract

  48. Shawn Curtis, University Student Attitudes Toward Mental Illness, Central Connecticut State University (Faculty Mentor: William B. Disch) Abstract

  49. Alyssa Fisher, The Relationship between Attachment Behaviors, Gender, and Perceived Stress, Eastern Connecticut State University (Faculty Mentor: Kristalyn Salters-Pedneault) Abstract

  50. Mark Salamanca, Sexual Orientation, Mental Health and Academic Performance, Central Connecticut State University (Faculty Mentor: Marianne Fallon) Abstract

  51. Jonathan Codraro, Deception of Non Verbal Cues, Central Connecticut State University (Faculty Mentor: Steven Horowitz) Abstract

  52. Jessica Howard, Perceptions of Rape, Central Connecticut State University (Faculty Mentor: William Disch) Abstract

  53. Meghan Clough, Eric Cerino, Isaiah Roby, Lauramarie Rahusen, & Kirby Lessard, Snake or Milkshake? Investigating Threat Detection in College Women, Eastern Connecticut State University (Faculty Mentors: Lyndsey Lanagan-Leitzel and Alita Cousins) Abstract

  54. Ashley L. Anderson, Selective Mutism in Children, Central Connecticut State University (Faculty Mentor: Carolyn R. Fallahi) Abstract

  55. Ashley L. Anderson, Why Aren't I Famous? Central Connecticut State University (Faculty Mentor: Bradley M. Waite) Abstract

  56. Melaney Coyle, Color Association, Central Connecticut State University (Faculty Mentor: Steven Horowitz) Abstract

  57. Eric Cerino, Exploring Academic Motivation and Self-Efficacy's Relationship to Academic Procrastination, Eastern Connecticut State University (Faculty Mentor: Kristalyn Salters-Pedneault) Abstract

  58. Jason LaRose, Negotiation Study, Central Connecticut State University (Faculty Mentor: Marianne Fallon) Abstract

  59. Nicholas Pyne, The influence of alcohol and marijuana attitudes on procrastination, Central Connecticut State University (Faculty Mentor: Steven Horowitz) Abstract

  60. Ashley Balazovich, Type of Education Influencing Severity of Stigma, Central Connecticut State University (Faculty Mentor: Steven Horowitz) Abstract

  61. Robert Perry-Crawford, Attitudes Towards Media, Central Connecticut State University (Faculty Mentor: Marianne Fallon) Abstract

  62. D.M. Quartermane, Erika Lindgren, Tyler Brown, Alicia Prigodich, The Effects of Disfluency on Comprehension, Southern Connecticut State University (Faculty Mentor: Patricia Kahlbaugh) Abstract

  63. Daphne Kounavis, An Exploration of Autistic Spectrum Disorders in Children, Central Connecticut State University (Faculty Mentor: Carolyn Fallahi) Abstract

  64. Rachael Rheaume, Religiosity and Anxiety, Central Connecticut State University (Faculty Mentor: William Disch) Abstract

  65. Christopher Brown, Katherine E. Chesanek, Adam Stryjewski, and Julian Finnegan, Media Exposure and Hypermasculinity: An Exploratory Study, Central Connecticut State University (Faculty Mentors: Jason F. Sikorski and Dr. Steven Horowitz) Abstract

  66. Andrew Narcisco, Effects of Superstition on Anxiety and Free-throw Shot Execution, Eastern Connecticut State University (Faculty Mentor: James Diller) Abstract

  67. Jackelyn Stafford, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Central Connecticut State University (Faculty Mentor: Carolyn Fallahi) Abstract

  68. Alexa Palasky, Image, Peer Perception and Social Avoidance in Female College Athletes and Non-Athletes, Eastern Connecticut State University (Faculty Mentor: Alita Cousins) Abstract

  69. Eliz Cruz, Alcohol Related Lyrics in Popular Songs and Alcohol Consumption in College Students, Central Connecticut State University (Faculty Mentor: William Disch) Abstract

  70. Laura Hampson, The Effect of Prop Use on Memory in Actors and Non Actors, Central Connecticut State University (Faculty Mentor: William Disch) Abstract

  71. Shana DePolo, The Problems that College Students Might Have With Cued and Non-Cued word Recall, Central Connecticut State University (Faculty Mentor: William Disch) Abstract

  72. Evan Lintz, The Effects of Nicotine Use on Memory, Eastern Connecticut State University (Faculty Mentor: Malcolm McCulloch) Abstract



Abstracts: Poster Presentations


  Examining the Relations between Social Anxiety Disorder, Coping Styles, and Alcohol Use Disorders
Rachel Schaedler

Past research has shown that social anxiety sufferers often consume more alcohol than do non-sufferers and that alcohol consumption is positively correlated with avoidant coping (Callan, Catanzaro, & Laurent, 1996; O'Grady, Cullum, Armeli, & Tennan, 2011). I tested the hypotheses that social anxiety scores would be positively correlated with avoidant coping scores and that social anxiety scores and avoidant coping scores would predict scores indicative of an alcohol use disorder. Data collected shows that social anxiety scores and avoidant coping scores did positively correlate but together they did not predict alcohol use disorders. This research can be used to help socially anxious individuals develop adaptive coping styles.


  A Review of Psychosurgery
Isaiah Roby

Psychosurgery has a sordid past which it may have rightly earned, but it may have a bright future. Lobotomies and other forms of psychosurgery may have fallen out of favor and may even be banned in some areas, but the use of psychosurgery is not stopping. Newer surgeries such as Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) are coming into favor. There is debate whether or not DBS is a type of psychosurgery. To shed light on this issue the history, uses, and side effects of psychosurgery will be examined through a literature review to see if DBS is a form of psychosurgery.


  Gender Differences in Face-to-Face Social Interaction and Social Networking Site Use
Ariel Dupont

Social networking sites (SNS) are relatively new internet technologies that create availability for communication and provide information for past, present, and future events. College students use SNS for various aspects of their lives. Students may find social networking so gratifying that they decrease their face-to-face interactions in order to maintain their online social lives. Previous research indicates conflicting relations between face-to-face interaction and social network site (SNS) use. Results from the current study indicate there is no significant relation between SNS use and face-to-face interaction. In addition, women do not use SNS significantly more than men. Future research should look into the relation between face-to-face interaction and overall internet use.


  Optimism and Social Support as Predictors of Relationship Closeness
Shannon Glenn

The aim of this study was to investigate dispositional optimism and perceived social support as predictors of relationship closeness. Optimism and social support have frequently been linked to relationship outcomes such as satisfaction and quality. 28 college undergraduates completed three self-report questionnaires, the Lifetime Orientation Test-Revised (LOT-R), the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support (MSPSS), and the Relationship Closeness Inventory (RCI). A multiple regression analysis indicated that optimism and social support were not significant predictors of relationship closeness. These results have implications for marriage and relationship counseling.


  Effects of Violent Media on Self-Esteem and Aggression
Melissa Groccia

This study evaluated effects of violent media on self-esteem and aggression. Previous studies have shown that violent video games are perceived to be more frustrating, exciting, and arousing, than non-violent games and are related to high self-esteem and high state aggression. Previous research has also shown links between low self-esteem and aggressive behavior. By using The Buss and Perry Aggression Questionnaire (1992) and The Rosenberg Self-Esteem Questionnaire (1965), it was expected that participants who played violent video games would have higher state aggression and higher self-esteem when comparing these variables before and after playing the video games. After conducting this study, there was no significant difference between pre- and post-test and non-violent and violent video games with respect to aggression or self-esteem. Despite the lack of statically significant finds, future work could further evaluate these variables.


  Mood Disorders in Mothers Linked with Anxiety and Depression in Children
Kristina Bradley

This study will look at the relationships between having a mother that shows prominent signs of a mood disorder and how it affects depression and anxiety levels in their children. Participants were given a demographic questionnaire along with the Clinical Anxiety scale and the Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depressed Mood Scale.


  Effects of Self Monitoring Levels and Pressure on Conformity
Michael Spodick, Nicole Morin, and Jamie Iannotti

Our theories of research are based on the desire to identify persons whose social behavior is either sensitive to situational factors or are more or less independent to such influences. This study is designed to continue previous research on social pressures and factors that help psychologists better understand the nature and influence of conformity. There is significant evidence to support our hypothesis that the amount of pressure on an individual has an effect on the amount they will conform.


  All Things Specific Phobia and the Validity of the Current Classification System
Kathleen Croke

Specific phobia, formerly referred to as simple phobia, has an essential feature of marked and persistent fear of clearly discernible, circumscribed objects or situations (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual IV, American Psychiatric Association, 2000, p. 443). When diagnosing a patient with specific phobia, a professional has the option to use one of five subtypes to accompany the diagnosis. However, these subtypes are only optional and are not supported by statistical analyses. For this very reason, the subtypes' validity needs to be questioned. In addition, a dimensional approach needs to be considered to prevent ambiguity among clinicians.


  Internal Locus of Control and Marijuana Use in College Students
Kathleen Croke

This study examined marijuana use among college students grouped based on their class standing and levels of internal locus of control. Students filled out standardized measures of internal locus of control to determine whether they had low, medium or high levels. They then filled out various standardized self-report measure that rated their marijuana use. Results have implications for developing methods of intervention for college students who use marijuana, rather than using resources to better their chances of obtaining an occupation after graduation. Future research can be conducted to examine the underlying reasons for students' likelihood of engaging in illicit behaviors.


  Gender Differences, Openness, and Attitudes towards Disabled People
Randi Jo Barton

Individuals with disabilities are not only faced with their disability but also with how others perceive them. It is hypothesized that individuals with higher trait openness will have a more positive attitude towards individuals with disabilities. It is also hypothesized that men will have a higher trait openness and will be more accepting of individuals with disabilities. Results indicated that there was no correlation between trait openness and attitudes (r=.221). Results also showed that men had higher trait openness and more accepting attitudes towards individuals with disabilities, however, the only significance found was for trait openness t (46) =-2.443, p=.018.


  Self Esteem and Attachment Style as Correlates of Relationship Satisfaction
Taylor Martinez

In the current study, self-esteem and attachment styles were explored as correlates of relationship satisfaction. Forty undergraduate students answered three questionnaires, one that measured individual self-esteem, a second that measured individual attachment style (Anxious, Avoidant and Secure) and a third that measured relationship satisfaction. The findings of this study revealed that men did not report higher levels of self-esteem than women. Also, individuals with higher self-esteem did not report higher relationship satisfaction. Finally, a relationship was found to exist among individuals with Secure and Anxious attachment styles and their relationship satisfaction.


  Relationship between Exercise, Working Memory, and Processing Speed in College Students
Colleen Gomola

This study assessed the relationship between physical activity and performance on a memory and processing speed task in thirty-five college students. The students completed the California Verbal Learning Test II to assess working memory, The Trail Making Test for processing speed, followed by a self-report of physical activity using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire to determine their amount and intensity of physical activity. Data entry and analysis is currently being processed using a series of Pearson Correlation coefficients to determine statistical significance. If statistically significant correlations are observed than an r2 will be performed to calculate effect size.


  The Relationships Among Media Exposure and Attitudes on Romanticism and Unrequited Love
Cristina Lauria

According to Baumeister, Wotman and Stillwell (1993), the would-be-lover does not experience unrequited love as harshly as the rejecter. The definition of unrequited love is: affection not reciprocated or returned (Collins English Dictionary, 2003). The term 'Would-Be-Lover' identifies the person who experiences unrequited love as the person loving, i.e. the one being rejected. This term is also used in identifying the person loving in my study. For this study, participants will be divided into four groups based on lover status and degree of media influence. The purpose of this study is to find a correlation between a would-be-lover's actions and the media that they are exposed to.


  Weather or Not: Relationships between Weather, Weather Reactivity, Mood, Locus of Control, and Prosocial Behavior
Brittany Gladden

The relationship between weather and mood has been well researched. However, we still don't understand relationships between weather, individual differences in weather reactivity, mood, locus of control, and helping behavior. 20 Central Connecticut State University students were randomly assigned to three weather conditions; nice, neutral, and rain days, and completed a series of questionnaires including a mood measure; Positive and Negative Affect Schedule, Rotter's Locus of Control Scale, Weather Reactivity Scale, and an 'optional' social opinions survey, where the amount of questions they were willing to answer was an index of prosocial behavior. Data is currently still in collection.


  Campus Involvement, Residency, and Academic Success in College Students
Courtney Taylor

The Central Connecticut State University first-time, full-time 4-year graduation rate is only 22%. Improving the 4-year graduation rate will decrease tuition costs for students and enhance the University's image. Previous research demonstrated that participating in campus activities predicts high levels of academic conscientiousness, which links to overall GPA and graduation rate. Thus, the purpose of my study is to investigate whether a relationship exists between campus involvement, residency, and academic success. I recruited Central Connecticut State University students to complete questionnaires measuring Campus Involvement and their Academic Motivation Scale (AMS; Lockwood, P., Jordan, C. H., & Kunda, Z., 2002).


  Tweeting for the World to See: Narcissism and Twitter Use
Magen Anderson

Narcissistic personality scores have risen alongside the popularity of social networking sites. Facebook use has been linked to several narcissistic personality traits. However, a new social networking site (SNS), Twitter, has little research in regards to narcissism. A total of 80 Central Connecticut State University students completed a Narcissistic Personality Inventory. Further, participants' Twitter accounts were monitored to evaluate the degree of self-promoting content within status updates. Since SNSs afford people the opportunity to create or project their idealized self rather than posting accurate information of oneself, narcissistic individuals will be drawn to these online playgrounds (Nadkarni, & Hofmann, 2012).


  The Effect of Attitudes toward Sexuality on Sexual Health Communication
Paulina Cwalinski

Attitude towards sexuality and its effect on health protective sexual communication were researched. Past research has helped reinforce the concept that individuals with a permissive sexual attitude have a greater likelihood of contracting a sexual transmitted infection, one reason is due to a lack of sexual health communication. The goal of the experiment was to test to see if individuals with a conservative sexual behavior initiate health protective sexual communication more than individuals with a permissive sexual attitude. A total of 68 participants from Central Connecticut State University received two different types of questionnaires. One questionnaire tested their attitude toward sexuality. The other questionnaire tested their likelihood of initiating health protective sexual communication.


  The Relationship of Parental Authority and Alcohol Usage on Anxiety
Rachel Kulscar

Sixty undergraduate students were surveyed researching parenting styles (authoritative, authoritarian, and permissive) and alcohol usage on anxiety levels. Existing research shows that individuals with authoritarian parents have a higher level of anxiety compared to individuals with authoritative parents. For people that consume a large amount of alcohol, the levels of anxiety that they have will be higher. Participants with parents that use authoritarian parenting styles will have higher anxiety levels. There was a positive correlation between the authoritarian and alcohol usage variables r = 0.041, n = 58, p = 0.762. There was a negative relationship between the authoritative and levels of anxiety variables r = -.281, n = 60, p = .030.


  The Hundred Year Mystery of Childhood Disintegrative Disorder
Julian Finnegan

Childhood disintegrative disorder (CDD) is a rare disorder characterized by a sudden and significant loss of acquired skills. It begins with a period of two to ten years of normal development followed by deterioration of communication and cognitive skills. Behavioral and educational therapies have shown to be largely ineffective at reversing the effects of the disorder (American Psychiatric Association, Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 2000). CDD often results in severe intellectual disability and limited cognitive functioning. More research is needed to determine the possible causes, treatments and risk factors associated with the disorder.


  How Stress Affects College Students Grade Point Averages
Mary Mahon

Prior research looking at stress in college students showed that effective coping strategies to deal with all kinds of stress is essential. Academics and grades were high stress factors in the college students. The purpose of the study was to see how college students stress levels affect their grade point averages. The participants were given a demographic questionnaire and the College Life Stress Inventory, which had different events and asked to circle the ones that happened to them in the past year. No correlation was found between the stress scores and grade point averages.


  The relationship of Orthodox Christianity, Sexual Attitudes, and Guilt Proneness
Chelsea Myers

This study will examine the relationship between Orthodox Christian beliefs, sexual attitudes and guilt proneness. Thirty participants will be found at Eastern Connecticut State University a; liberal arts college in Connecticut. The Christian Orthodoxy scale, The Guilt and Shame Proneness Scale and The Sexual Attitudes Scale will be used to assess participants. It is expected that; Orthodox Christian beliefs will predict a less open sexual attitude, Orthodox Christian beliefs will predict a greater proneness to experiencing guilt and, open sexual attitudes will predict a lesser proneness to experiencing guilt. There were no significant results produced by the data collected.


  Extraversion, Agreeableness and Perceived Attraction of Online Dating Profiles
Stephanie MacLaren

The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between personality and perceived attraction with online profiles. Extraversion and agreeableness traits have been correlated to perceived attraction, but little research has focused on online dating (Ahmetoglu & Swami, 2012). Individuals with high extraversion and agreeableness scores should be more attracted to dating profiles. Participants from ECSU took the BFI (John, Donahue, & Kentle, 1991) that assesses both extraversion and agreeableness and the Interpersonal Attraction Scale to measure perceived attraction to a bogus online dating profile. This study found that personality traits did not determine attraction to the dating profile.


  Parental Marital Status: Estimating Optimism About the Likelihood of Marriage
Cassandra Hilerio

Past research has indicated that young adults whose parents are married are more optimistic about their own long-term relationships than those who have divorced parents. This effect seems to be strongest for males. Some people may internalize the negative impact of witnessing and experiencing the divorce of their parents, thus potentially increasing their own likelihood of divorce. The present study assessed three measures of optimism precursors that 94 college students described regarding long-term romantic relationships, their gender, and their parents' marital status. No significant relationships were found.


  Memory Across the Lifespan
Roxanne Campbell

This project is a literature review that explores memory from birth to death. It examines the differences between episodic memory, semantic memory, and procedural memory, the interaction between them, and their fallibility. Both the Atkinson-Shiffrin model and the Baddley-Hitch model of memory will be examined including a summary of the sensory memory, short-term memory, working memory, and long-term memory storage systems. I will then discuss several critical memory issues across the lifespan including infantile amnesia, childhood amnesia, and problems associated with memory decline in old age due to Alzheimer's disease and dementia.


  Relationship Between Stress Level, Coping Styles and Depression in Undergraduate University Students
Ruslan Abdukalikov

College attendance signifies a major change in a person's life. The change in environment combined with increased external and academic demand to succeed placed on students may contribute to increased stress and consequently depression levels. To deal with stress some of the strategies that students may utilize are either emotionally or problem focused. In this research project the effects of stress and coping style on depression were studied. This study showed a strong positive correlation between stress level and depression, as well as strong positive correlation between emotionally focused coping style and depression level.


  Effect of Depleted Central Executive Function on Passive Cheating
Kristen Vitelli and Ashley Anderson

Most investigations examining reasons for academic cheating involve personality characteristics or situational factors. Instead, we questioned whether cognitive factors, specifically executive function, affect cheating. Undergraduates completed a Stroop task that depleted or did not deplete central executive resources. Then, participants completed a rigged computer task in which they had to stop the correct answer from appearing by pressing the space bar. Failure to press the bar was our measure of cheating. Participants with depleted central executive resources pressed the space bar significantly less often (i.e., cheated more) than those with non-depleted resources, suggesting that cognitive factors indeed underlie cheating behavior.


  Defragmenting Hypermasculinity: The search for more homogenous subgroups
Julian Finnegan, Katherine Chesanek, Adam Stryjewski, and Christopher G. Brown

While much is known about the construct of hypermasculinity, a detailed clinical profile of hypermasculine men has yet to be developed. Scores from several standardized measures of personality traits and emotional tendencies were compared in men grouped on their levels of calloused sexual attitudes, risk taking and violence risk. Results can be utilized to create specific prevention programs for different types of hypermasculine men.


  Dance Movement Therapy: Decreased Stress in College Students
Carlos Marrero

Dance Movement Therapy (DMT) can be used as a coping mechanism to decrease stress amongst many different groups of people. Undergraduate students at Central Connecticut State University participated. The Index of Clinical Stress (ICS) (Abell, 1991) and the Stress-Arousal Checklist (SACL) (Mackay & Cox & Burrows &Lazzerini, 1978) were completed by both groups who attended a partnered or footwork dance movement therapy class. Results indicated that stress levels were lower in students who participated in the footwork class than those in the partnered class. Dance Movement Therapy can be taught effectively in different ways to decrease stress in college students.


  The Effects of Stereotype Threat on Female Math Performance
James Bachand

This study examined the effects that stereotype threat has on female math performance. The exposure to the stereotype threat and the difficulty of the task were manipulated in a 2x2 factorial design. Fifteen female college students were randomly assigned to four conditions. It was expected that the threat group assigned the easy math performance test would out perform the control, and that the control would out perform the threat group on the difficult test. A two-way ANOVA revealed that there was no significant main effect for difficulty or threat exposure. There was also no significant interaction.


  How Technology Use Relates to Social Anxiety
Monica Concas

The use of technology has been related to social anxiety. This study examines the combination of the use of the internet and cell phones on social anxiety. I hypothesized that there would be a positive correlation between the overuse of technology and social anxiety. Participants were 100 undergraduate students at Eastern Connecticut State University. They completed the Internet Over-use Scale (IOS) and the Cell-Phone Over-use Scale. The Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale (LSAS) was also completed. Correlational analysis indicated that there was a positive relationship between technology overuse and social anxiety.


  Difficulties in Diagnosing Generalized Anxiety Disorder
Alyssa Patenaude

Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD) is classified as an excessive, uncontrollable, and often irrational anxiety that occurs in everyday life. Classification issues about this disorder have risen ever since it was added to the DSM III because of its high co-morbidity rate. In order to help increase the validity and reliability of the GAD diagnosis, the DSM-5 will be adding a dimensional approach to help determine the severity of the disorder and if it could be diagnosed as something else.


  Personality and Relationship Status
Kelsea Burkhardt

The present study explored whether there is a relationship between personality and relationship status. Undergraduate participants took the Mini-IPIP Scale and reported their relationship status. This study hypothesized that those who scored higher on the trait, neuroticism, would be more likely single compared to those who scored lower on the trait neuroticism. This study also hypothesized that those who scored higher for extraversion, conscientiousness, openness, and agreeableness would be more likely than those who scored lower for these traits to be in a relationship. These hypotheses were not supported by the data.


  The Great Depression: A Review of Current Evolutionary Theories Explaining the Potential Utility of Depression
Colin Whiston

Depression's prevalence in modern society suggests that it may be an adaptive solution to stressful situations faced by our ancestors. The analytic rumination hypothesis (Andrews & Thomson, 2009) and social risk theory (Allen & Badcock, 2003) were developed to provide a framework for understanding the potential evolutionary function of depression. Depression may function to solve cognitively complex problems. It may be triggered by defeat or other interpersonal problems and promotes behaviors that increase group acceptance or decrease rejection from the group. Structured ruminations and social interventions may positively impact depression, while antidepressants may increase the severity or length of depression.


  Delayed Discounting and Ego Depletion: Effects on Food Choices
Margaret Daher and Courtney Lausier

Ego depletion has been shown to have negative effects on impulse control particularly in the area of food intake. The present study investigates the effect of ego depletion as well as delayed discounting on individuals' food choices. We expect that ego depletion will cause the participant to choose a higher caloric content food, particularly if they have displayed lower self-control on the delayed discounting task.


  Effects of Temperature Perception and Work Ethic on Task-Switching
Patricia Spak

Research has shown that environmental factors (e.g., temperature) and internal factors (e.g., work ethic) can affect performance, but has yet to show how these factors interact together. 40 participants from CCSU complete a work ethic questionnaire to determine high and low work ethic. Participants were separated into two conditions (warm/cool temperature induction), and performed a gender/emotion task-switching task. It's predicted that the participants in the warm condition will have quicker reaction time than the cool condition, and high work ethic participants will have quicker reaction time than low work ethic. These results can be applied to the business world.


  Caffeine on Working Memory
Brittany Graff

This study evaluated how caffeine affects working memory. The independent variable is the consumed caffeine and the amount and kind. The dependent variable is the persons score on the N-Back working memory test. A correlation test was done to find the differences between working memory and caffeine consumption. It was expected that a high intake in caffeine would be correlated with a higher working memory, as was if a you prominently consumed coffee. It was also expected that if you were a habitual consumer you would have a higher working memory. All results were non significant.


  The Effects of Popular Culture on Child and Adolescent Development
Melissa Symolon

Popular culture influences people's daily lives, whether it is through media, technology, music, or other avenues. Popular culture outlets may serve as tools for socialization for preschool children (Auster & Mansbach, 2012; Tepper & Cassidy, 1999), and may influence key aspects of adolescent development (Espinoza & Juvonen, 2011; Mitchell, Fineklhor, Jones, & Wolak, 2011; Primack, Douglas, Fine, & Dalton, 2009). This literature review evaluates how the popular culture venues of books, television, marketing of toys, technology, and music influence child development.


  Bereavement: Consequences for those in romantic relationships
Shamille K. Ellison

This study focused on consequences that bereavement could have on one's ability to form a lasting romantic relationship. Participants completed the Core Bereavement Items Scale (Burnett, Middleton, Raphael & Martinek, 1997), the Intimacy Scale (Walker & Thompson, 1983) and the Relationship Assessment Scale (Hendrick, 1988). These surveys tested their levels of bereavement, interpersonal intimacy and their current levels of relationship satisfaction. Using the Attachment Theory (Bowlby, 1969), this study assumes that bereavement will have a tremendous effect on formed relationships.


  Reading Comprehension and Music
Sam Loprete

The purpose of the study is to find a relationship between exposure to music and reading comprehension scores. It was predicted that upbeat music would cause a greater detriment on scores than relaxing music, and that lyrical music would cause a greater detriment than non-lyrical music. I found that the main effect of tempo had a significant effect on scores, as did the interaction between tempo and lyrics.


  Narcissism, Use of Social Media, and how they relate to Self-Esteem
Ellen Swol

This study aimed to look at narcissism, use of social media, and self-esteem in college students. A correlational analysis was conducted to support previous literature, which states that there is a positive correlation between self-esteem and narcissism (Campbell, 1999; Lima, 2007). It also presented a novel correlation to determine if there was a relation between self-esteem and use of social media, since no previous literature exists. It is important to look at these variables because college students are frequently using social media and self-esteem is a vital component of an individual.


  Ethnic Identity and Spirituality: Influences on Levels of Happiness
Marcelina Pyzik

Psychological hedonism theory was used to examine the relationship between a person's ethnic identity and individualistic personality and his or her levels of happiness and spirituality. Results indicated a better developed ethnic identity and feelings of individualism are correlated with increased happiness. A positive correlation between spirituality and happiness was found.


  Sexual Behavior, Sexual Satisfaction, and Relationship Satisfaction in College Students
Jaclyn Vancour

This study examined the correlations between sexual debut within a relationship compared to their relationship and sexual satisfaction. Biological sex differences were also compared against these variables. Past research in this field is either out of date or has come to differing conclusions, therefore warranting further research. Participants included 125 students enrolled at a New England university. Satisfaction levels were assessed using two valid and reliable measures. It was found that couples who had sex later in their relationship reported higher levels of relationship satisfaction than earlier sex relationships. Men and women reported similar satisfaction rates on both scales.


  Gender differences in attitudes towards traditional and cyberbullying
Agnieszka Samsel

Due to the popularity of the internet and mobile phones, new opportunities for indirect bullying, or cyberbullying have arisen. Cyberbullying has been understudied in the United States undergraduate population. The purpose of this study was to examine gender differences between attitudes towards cyberbullying and traditional bullying. This study consisted of a total of 60 undergraduate students from Central Connecticut State University. Each participant was asked to fill out a series of surveys relating to bullying and their attitudes. The focus was on the differences between genders. Most studies that look at bullying focus on children and adolescents. There is a lack of research in cyberbullying among college-aged students. However, bullying can impact individuals in negative ways no matter how old they are. Bullying can lead individuals to feel depressed, can lead to drug or alcohol abuse, and can even tragically result in suicide.


  Immunohistochemistry Protocol Optimization: A Methods Experiment
Nick Santo and Jim Lahti

We performed two methods experiments to establish a protocol for immunohistochemistry using the vibratome and the antibody, Beta-Tubulin. First, brain was sliced and incubated with antibody at 1 of 3 concentrations. Tissue was inspected following secondary antibody incubation and visualization. Optimal dilution was determined based on specific and nonspecific staining. Exp 2, was designed to improve slicing procedures using the vibratome; tissue thickness, rate of advancement, and vibration were varied. Inspection of stained tissue revealed that, although the vibratome is a poor choice for tissue slicing, we were able to optimize this equipment for use with immunohistochemistry in our lab.


  The Relationship Between Religion and Happiness
Elizabeth DeConto

Happiness has a history of being affected by religion. This study looked to see if there was a significant difference in happiness between freshman and sophomores depending on his/her religious views. I hypothesized that sophomores would demonstrate a higher level of happiness than freshman, and that sophomores would also be more comfortable expressing their religion than freshmen. There are no statistically significant results within this study. Religion has overall had an effect on someone's happiness when looked at in psychological studies.


  Examining Optimism and Locus of Control as Predictors of Coping Styles
Michael Cole III

Previous research has found that optimism and locus of control are significantly correlated with the coping styles individuals use in stressful situations. This study sought to replicate those findings and extend them to individuals' everyday experiences. Participants completed three self-report measures exploring optimism, locus of control, and coping style. Consistent with hypotheses, individuals with higher optimism engaged in more problem-focused coping than individuals with lower optimism, p < .01. In addition, individuals with an internal locus of control engaged in more problem-focused coping than individuals with an external locus of control, p <.05.


  College Residential Status on Alcohol Motivations and Academics
Shelby Reig

This study examined student residential status during college (commuter, on-campus, or off-campus) on motivations to consume alcohol and further, academic competence and grade point average (GPA). In consideration with the Social Learning Theory (Bandura, 1977), it was hypothesized that commuter students would have higher average GPA and academic competence, and lower average scores on social and enhancement alcohol consumption motivations versus on-campus and off-campus students. Results from the study partially supported the hypotheses.


  University Student Attitudes Toward Mental Illness
Shawn Curtis

The current study examined stigmatizing attitudes directed toward individuals with mental illness. The participants were 100 undergraduate students at a northeastern university. All participants in this study completed standardized measures regarding attitudes toward the mentally ill. The results of this study will show a positive correlation between the number of psychology classes completed by students and increased stigmatizing attitudes toward the mentally ill.


  The Relationship between Attachment Behaviors, Gender, and Perceived Stress
Alyssa Fisher

Previous research has shown that insecure attachment in infancy can affect attachment behaviors in adulthood. This study examined whether attachment in relationships is related to perceived stress. I hypothesized that participants who report unsecured attachment in a romantic relationship will also report high levels of perceived stress. I also hypothesized that male participants will report more attachment-related anxiety and avoidant behaviors, and more perceived stress in their relationships than females. Data from this experiment could be helpful because how individuals perceive their own stress levels are important in determining their proneness to psychological and physical illnesses (Reiner et al., 2010).


  Sexual Orientation, Mental Health and Academic Performance
Mark Salamanca

This study examines the effect of sexual orientation on mental health and academic performance. Students enrolled in introductory psychology classes at Northeastern university participated. After grouping students based on their sexual orientation, they completed questionnaires regarding feelings and behaviors assessing mental health and academic study performance. I am currently still in process of recruiting more participants to conduct a full-on analysis.


  Deception of Non Verbal Cues
Jonathan Codraro

This study was done in order to identify what specific types of non-verbal cues are more prominent when a person lies compared to when they are telling the truth. The hypothesis was that Manipulators would be more prominent when lying. After running a two way repeated measures ANOVA the truth and lie setting were not statistically significant, the Cues setting was statistically significant and the interaction was statistically significant. A paired t test proved significance between smile and laughing cues and truth/lie setting , although there was not significance in the manipulator cue it is headed in the correct direction.


  Perceptions of Rape
Jessica Howard

Although there are many vignette studies concerning sexual assault, there is a lack of research studying the effects of different relationship statuses of the victim (Duran, Moya & Meigas, 2011). The present vignette study examined the effects of relationship status, and kind of rape on college students attribution of blame to the victim. The purpose of this study is to provide additional information regarding how people attribute blame in certain cases of rape.


  Snake or Milkshake? Investigating Threat Detection in College Women
Meghan Clough, Eric Cerino, Isaiah Roby, Lauramarie Rahusen, and Kirby Lessard

The ability to detect threats gives individuals an evolutionary advantage. This project examines the differences between detecting threats and non-threats. A female college student sample of 18 years and older was given the task of detecting threats in a stream of rapidly presented pictures where they were asked if the two target objects are natural (ex. snakes or flowers) or man-made (ex. guns or buttons). Preliminary results suggest an advantage for threatening stimulus. This project will be extended to include new mothers who might have an increased advantage at detection.


  Selective Mutism in Children
Ashley L. Anderson

Selective Mutism (SM) in children is becoming increasingly categorized by researchers as an anxiety-related disorder. Due to the rarity of this disorder, the availability of research is severely lacking. There are many overlapping symptoms that make the classification and diagnosis of SM difficult to make. Etiological theories of SM include those from both genetic and environmental perspectives. Effective treatments are represented by a range of therapies and medications, with the most useful being a combination of the two. Classification, etiological, and treatment issues are examined.


  Why Aren't I Famous?
Ashley L. Anderson

Reality television shows (i.e., 'unscripted' shows, such as Keeping Up with the Kardashians or Jersey Shore) have become highly popular in recent years (Nielsen, 2011). But why are people attracted to them? Prior research (Young & Pinsky, 2006) suggests that these shows often feature narcissistic cast members or celebrities engaged in self-aggrandizing behaviors. Until now, no studies have examined the relationship between viewing reality television and the narcissism of viewers. Results from 59 students at a Connecticut university suggested that those who view reality television, in general, are more narcissistic than those who do not.


  Color Association
Melaney Coyle

Past research has indicated that color associations rely heavily on shape. The purpose of the study conducted was to examine whether individuals experience specific grapheme-color associations. Participants in the study included both males and females who attend Central Connecticut State University, ages 18-29 years. The participants were given two handouts, the first included all 26 letters from the English alphabet repeated three times in random order. The second handout included 10 blocks of color that were numbered. Participants were asked to pick the color that they most associated with each letter. There was a significant relationship between grapheme and color.


  Exploring Academic Motivation and Self-Efficacy's Relationship to Academic Procrastination
Eric Cerino

In a sample of 101 college students, academic motivation and self-efficacy are assessed as potential predictors of academic procrastination. It is hypothesized that academic motivation and self-efficacy together have a strong negative relationship to academic procrastination among college students, with academic motivation having a stronger negative relationship than self-efficacy. Significant negative relationships between academic procrastination and three types of intrinsic, one type of extrinsic academic motivation, and general self-efficacy were found. Additionally, Academic motivation significantly predicts academic procrastination, with self-efficacy adding as an additional predictor, but does not have a unique significance.


  Negotiation Study
Jason LaRose

Abstract


  The influence of alcohol and marijuana attitudes on procrastination
Nicholas Pyne

Increased levels of anxiety and depression have been linked to higher levels of procrastination. Alcohol and marijuana consumption are associated with anxiety and depression. The current study examined the relationship between attitudes that 30 undergraduate students hold toward the consumption of alcohol and marijuana and their levels of procrastination. Neither attitudes about alcohol or marijuana consumption were significantly related to procrastination levels. Interestingly, a negative correlation was shown to exist between alcohol use and marijuana use attitudes ( r = -.491) which suggests that people may take sides concerning the use of one substance over the other.


  Type of Education Influencing Severity of Stigma
Ashley Balazovich

It is well known that there is a social stigma surrounding mental illness. There are two forms of education that have been studied singularly, the biological or psychosocial approach. The research has shown that more negative attitudes have been measured when biological explanations were used. Facts were presented about schizophrenia and a survey proceeded. An independent groups t-test showed that the differences between the groups was due to chance, F=0.383, p >0.05. A significant difference to the overall findings is that the biological group exhibited more attitudes of danger from schizophrenics than the psychosocial group.


  Attitudes Towards Media
Robert Perry-Crawford

Does exposure to violent media affect the thinking and attitudes of individuals being exposed to it? Past studies have measured aggressive behavior levels after exposure, but I am measuring tendencies and attitudes of individuals after exposure. Participants were spilt into two conditions, both played a videogame with violent content. The difference was that one game included aggressive behavior and the other's focus was to avoid danger. Participants took the Agression Provacation Questionaire, and I predict that those in the aggressive condition will have higher aggression scores than those in the non-aggressive condition.


  The Effects of Disfluency on Comprehension
D.M. Quartermane, Erika Lindgren, Tyler Brown, and Alicia Prigodich

If the material of a lecture is difficult to understand in the first place, then it is going to be much more difficult for the student to understand the material with the addition of disfluencies, such as connector words and interjections. It is hypothesized that students will do worse in comprehension when they are exposed to disfluencies in a passage, rather than students who have been exposed to the fluent passage. Disfluencies in this case are the use of connector words: 'uhm', 'like', 'uh', 'you know' as well as long pauses.


  An Exploration of Autistic Spectrum Disorders in Children
Daphne Kounavis

Autism has been recently been expanded to Autistic Spectrum Disorder (ASD). ASD is much more complex, varied, and prevalent than history has shown. Ranging in severity, ASD limits the child's functioning in a number of ways, with symptoms ranging from lack of social reciprocity to impaired or nonexistent language and motor skills. The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (American Psychiatric Association, 2000) fails to integrate the disorders that have now been included in the ASD category, and also fails to highlight comorbidity rates. Such discrepancies have caused major limitations in the diagnosis and treatment of children with ASD.


  Religiosity and Anxiety
Rachael Rheaume

This study examined a possible connection between religiosity, general anxiety proneness, existential anxiety level, and self-deceptive thinking. The concept of self-deception is discussed and research on the nature of the phenomenon is presented. Results of the study will be used to make inferences about how religiosity might be motivated by anxiety and/or existential anxiety. Results may also provide information about the psychological mechanisms involved in religious belief and in the adopting of religious beliefs.


  Media Exposure and Hypermasculinity: An Exploratory Study
Christopher Brown, Katherine E. Chesanek, Adam Stryjewski, and Julian Finnegan

217 male undergraduate college students served as participants and completed multiple standardized self-report measures of hypermasculine tendencies. Participants who preferred movies and television programs featuring central themes of hypermasculinity or participants who used pornography to an excessive degree tended to score highest on various measures of hypermasculine tendencies. Future research should include qualitative data collection methods, in conjunction with traditional quantitative measures, to further elucidate the construct of hypermasculinity.


  Effects of Superstition on Anxiety and Free-throw Shot Execution
Andrew Narcisco

This study evaluates the effects of superstition on anxiety and free-throw shooting percentages in basketball players. Past research states that pre-shot routines improve the shooting performance and as compared to when the pre-shot routine is not used (Czech, Ploszay & Burke, 2004; Predebon & Docker, 1992). It was hypothesized that when players' use the superstitious pre-shot routine, there would be lower anxiety levels and higher accuracy when shooting free-throws. Using the STAI, and rounds of 10 free-throws with and without pre-shot routines, it was found that accuracy was reduced, and anxiety was higher when players could not engage in their pre-shot ritual relative to when they could.


  Post Traumatic Stress Disorder
Jackelyn Stafford

Post-traumatic stress disorder is an unfortunate mental disorder that can occur at any age. People develop post-traumatic stress disorder by going through a traumatic event, for example something that is life threatening or dangerous to a person. Post-traumatic stress disorder can develop in children, but it is sometimes hard to diagnose them. The reason it is hard to diagnose them is because they do not have the same symptoms as adults. Children might have bad nightmares of something traumatic they went through, but most doctors and parents think that it is normal behavior to have bad dreams at a young age. There are some classification issues to PTSD and children. It is hard to tell when a child has PTSD because their symptom's do not show also show a problem. Most parents think a child showing fear, is normal for their age, because most children have many fears until they are an adolescent. The best treatments for post-traumatic stress disorder are group therapy, individual therapy, medication, and family therapy. It is important that children with PTSD get help.


  Image, Peer Perception and Social Avoidance in Female College Athletes and Non-Athletes
Alexa Palasky

The present study seeks to determine whether there is a significant difference in social physique anxiety and body esteem levels between female student athletes and female non-student athletes, this study also examined if there is a significant relationship between social physique anxiety, fear of physical attractiveness being negatively evaluated and body esteem and if there is a significant difference in social physique anxiety between female athletes who compete in individual sports versus team sports. This study will also be used to determine whether the newly developed scale assessing negative evaluation by peers is a reliable measure of body esteem and social physique anxiety. Participants will be a sample of 134 female student athletes and non-student athletes from different universities and colleges and at least 18 years old. Participants completed five surveys: The Body Esteem Scale, the Social Physique Anxiety Scale (SPAS), the Palasky Fear of Negative Evaluation by Peers Scale (PNEPS), the Social Avoidance and Distress Scale (SAD). Social physique anxiety and body esteem levels of student athletes were not significantly different than non-student athletes. Social physique anxiety, fear of physical attractiveness being negatively evaluated and body esteem were all strongly related. Social physique anxiety levels of student athletes who play individual sports were significantly higher than student athletes who play team sports.


  Alcohol Related Lyrics in Popular Songs and Alcohol Consumption in College Students
Eliz Cruz

Alcohol misuse is a worldwide problem and a major risk factor for disease and social harm (Koordeman, Anschutz, & Engels, 2011). Some consumers, especially adolescents, make their choices based of the music they listen to (Kistler, Rodgers, Power, Austin, & Hill, 2010). The present study assessed the reports of alcohol consumption by college students listening to different types of music. It is hypothesized that females will score higher on the MAST measure than males in the population. Participants listening to five songs with alcohol lyrics will score higher on the AEOS measure than participants in the control and songs with no lyrics in the population.


  The Effect of Prop Use on Memory in Actors and Non Actors
Laura Hampson

This study investigated the link between memory recall and prop use in actors and non actors. It explored the theories of embodied cognition and expertise in the context of acting. After giving participants a short monologue to memorize, one group used designated props during performance and others did not use any. After the performance there recall was measured by a short worksheet based on the text. It is hypothesized actors will perform better than non-actors, and prop use will improve memorization in both groups.


  The Problems that College Students Might Have With Cued and Non-Cued word Recall
Shana DePolo

This study examined the correlation between whether students performed better on cued word recall or non-cued word recall of undergraduate university students. For the trial, participants would have a list of 30 words but would not know the length of the list prior to the study of the cue to recall (Ward, Grenfell-Essam, & Tan, 2010). The participant would then be handed a list in which it would be placed right in front of them so they can see it visually and read it silently to themselves. Each participant would have 3 minutes to memorize 30 words. I am interested to see if the length of the list affected the order of the words recalled.


  The Effects of Nicotine Use on Memory
Evan Lintz

This study hypothesized that nicotine abstinence would result in cognitive impairment that would return to normal following smoking. Participants' working memory and spatial working memory were tested during and after a 12-hour abstinence from smoking. A 2 x 2 x 3 factorial design was employed with both smokers and non-smokers, to test the hypothesis that abstinence from smoking will cause cognitive impairments that will be restored post-abstinence. It was expected that nicotine dependence and withdrawal would be positively correlated with individuals' decline in cognitive ability and a greater decline in cognitive ability would be negatively correlated with successful cessation behavior.


 
Poster/Spoken Presentation Information

All abstracts were reviewed by the committee. The top project from each CSU will be delivered as a spoken presentation and will receive an award. The remaining projects will be delivered as posters (the top poster from each school will also win an award). The first 60 posters will be displayed on large conference-quality poster display boards and are limited to a maximum width of 36 inches. The remaining posters will be displayed on cardboard posterboards which will be provided by Eastern.

 
Getting to Campus

Campus can be reached from US 6 Eastbound. Follow the signs for UConn, exiting US 6 at CT Route 195. At the end of the ramp, turn right onto High Street. Take the third left and follow Young Rd. to the two parking garages. You may park in either garage.


Psychology Day will be held in the Science Building, which is about a 5-10 minute walk from the parking garages. Follow Eastern Rd. past the Sports Center and then follow the access road past Webb Hall to the Science Building. Signs will direct you.


83 Windham Street, Willimantic, Connecticut 06226 USA
Phone: (860) 465-4540 | Fax: (860) 465-4541
Contact Us | Directions | University Disclaimer | Eastern Home