Research Institutes Help Young Students to Identify as Scholars

David Porter ’20 presents “Overlooking How to Fish: How Chris Yates’ Contributions to Modern Day Transcendentalism Have Yet to be Recognized” in the English SRI.

Summer vacation was delayed for four groups of Eastern students who immediately followed the end of the school year with intensive, weeklong research programs on campus. From May 20–24, four Summer Research Institutes (SRIs) engaged select, up-and-coming students in projects pertaining to the fields of psychology, English, political science and network science.

Speaking to the goal of the SRIs, Political Science Professor Courtney Broscious said, “We want to engage students earlier in their academic careers. We want to immerse them in applied research at a younger age and help them to think of themselves as scholars.”

Political science SRI students and faculty pose for a group photo outside of Webb Hall.

Led by Broscious and Political Science Professor Nicole Krassas, the political science SRI challenged first- and second-year students to develop research proposals for projects they will carry out during the academic year. Using applied research methods, the students determined individual topics of inquiry, conducted preliminary research and wrote proposals.

Sophomore Griffin Cox’s research proposal concerns the campaign rhetoric of the 2016 presidential election and how President Trump’s language compares to that of former Presidents Regan and Nixon. “How does he compare to previous galvanizing figures in conservative politics?” questioned Cox.

Sophomore Luc Poirier’s proposal concerns male participation in, and identification with, the feminist movement. “I believe the issue with gaining the support of men in the feminist movement is in part rooted in the word ‘feminist’ itself,” said Poirier. “The term is synonymous with ‘feminine,’ which doesn’t appeal to the ‘macho culture’ that is still alive today.”

The Psychology Department hosted a SRI for 10 students who conducted psychological research on topics related to prejudice, discrimination and stereotypes. Led by Professors Alita Cousins and Jennifer Leszczynski, the students’ inquiry covered such topics as gender and criminality, the effects of physical attractiveness on perceived characteristics, parenting influences on gender and more.

Shirley Holloway ’21 presents “The Association Between Feminism and Gender Roles” at the psychology SRI.

Freshman Sierra Nastasi’s project on gender stereotypes in sports was inspired by her experience as a female hockey player. She said: “Playing on both men’s and women’s teams, I’ve noticed how perceptions of female hockey players differ from those of their male counterparts. I’ve always wanted to learn more about the perceptions that arise in cross-gendered sports.”

The English Department brought together 10 first-year and transfer students for a SRI titled “Finding your Scholarly Voice,” which focused on developing scholarly projects on texts of students’ choice. 

“The workshop aimed to help students dive into the scholarly conversation surrounding their texts and find their own ways to contribute to that conversation,” said Professor Allison Speicher, who led the workshop. “Students completed extensive research, synthesizing a wide variety of sources, including literary scholarship, histories, authors’ journals and letters, book reviews and theoretical perspectives, to craft project plans and abstracts for their own scholarly articles.”

Network science SRI students and faculty pose for a group photo.

Freshman Bailey Hosko’s project investigated the minor role of the teacher in the book “Push” by the author Sapphire. The teacher was a “change agent” for the main character, an illiterate 16-year-old girl from Harlem. “The research institute gave me a head start on my senior seminar, but more importantly it gave me a desire to further investigate a topic that I’m interested in as a career,” said Hosko, who aspires for a career as an educator with a focus on literacy.

Mathematics Professor Megan Heenehan and Computer Science Professor Garrett Dancik collaborated on a SRI that introduced students to the field of network science. The week-long program utilized techniques in graph theory, computer programming and network analysis to collected data from movie scripts. Broken into groups, the students used the information to analyze the social structure and sentiment of “Mean Girls, “The Dark Knight” and “Batman and Robin.”

Written by Michael Rouleau

Windham NAACP Recognizes Dwight Bachman

Left to right: Sociology Professor Dennis Canterbury and wife Sandra, Mathematics Professor Bonsu Osei, Dwight Bachman, Communications Professor Christopher Ayeni, Accounting Professor Candice Deal and Stacey Close, Associate Provost and Vice President for Equity and Diversity
Left to right: Salim Bachman, Dwight Bachman, Bonsu Osei, Dennis Canterbury, Sandra Canterbury, U.S. Rep. Joe Courtney and Stacey Close, Associate Provost and Vice President for Equity and Diversity
Theatre Professor Kristen Morgan and Dwight Bachman
Keynote Speaker Lottie Scott

 

On June 1, the Windham/Willimantic Branch of the NAACP presented Dwight Bachman, public relations officer at Eastern Connecticut State University, its President’s Award. The award ceremony took place during the NAACP’s Second Annual Freedom Fund Dinner, held at the Lakeview Restaurant in Coventry.

The award is given “to an individual whose outstanding participation and contributions provide essential support to the President and hence to the Windham\Willimantic branch’s growth and success.”

The NAACP’s mission is to secure the political, education, social and economic equality of rights in order to eliminate race-based discrimination and ensure the health and well-being of all human beings.

Dwight Bachman and Leah Ralls

“Mr. Bachman has shared his knowledge of African American history with me often, and that knowledge has assisted me with developing programs for the branch,” said NAACP President Leah Ralls in presenting the award. “As his guest at a Hartford Foundation for Public Giving event, I learned much about generating support for organizations such as the NAACP though donations. When I served as keynote speaker at the Putnam, CT, Martin Luther King Jr. breakfast this year, a video that Mr. Bachman researched, wrote and produced back in 1983 on Dr. King that aired on television stations around the world fit perfectly into my presentation.”

Lottie B. Scott, author of the book “Deep South, Deep North” and a member of the state’s Commission on Human Rights and Opportunities for more than 22 years, delivered the keynote address. “Be a champion for change. Pay back what has been given to you. My mother taught me to not talk about anybody’s child. Help improve opportunities for young people,” Scott said at the event. “Give the world the best you have, and the best will come back to you.”

Bachman was also named one of the Connecticut NAACP’ s “2018 100 Most Influential Blacks in Connecticut; received the 2018 James Ralston/David G. Carter Sr. Youth Education Innovator Award from the Prince Hall Masons of Connecticut; was honored with the 2018 Distinguished Reverend Collin Bennett/Marcus Garvey Award by St. Martin’s Episcopal Church in Hartford; and was the recipient of a 2016 Quarter Century Award by the National Council for the Advancement and Support of Education.

In 2007, Eastern presented Bachman the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Distinguished Service Award, and in 2001, the Connecticut Library Association presented him its News Media Award.

Prior to being hired at Eastern in 1990, Bachman served as a “Black Scholar in Residence” at Wartburg Theological Seminary; was director of the Commission on Human Rights in Dubuque, IA; was an editor at Howard University; and served as an editor and news producer at radio and television news stations in Washington D.C., Baltimore, New York City, Stamford and West Hartford.

Bachman earned his Bachelor of Arts degree in English and Rhetoric at the University of Northern Iowa in Cedar Falls, IA, and his Master of Professional Studies in African and African American Studies at Cornell University.

Eastern Athletes Tops in Little East Conference for Third Straight Year

Eastern President Elsa Nunez; Athletic Director Lori Runksmeier; and LEC Commissioner Cora H.L. Brumley

 For the third straight year, Eastern Connecticut State University has claimed the Little East Conference (LEC) Commissioner’s Cup, the league’s top honor for overall athletic performance among the LEC’s nine primary member institutions. The Warriors captured the 2018-19 Commissioner’s Cup after accumulating a point average of 6.26. Eastern’s accomplishment is especially significant as it has only 17 of the 19 varsity sports for which LEC members earn points.

“We are delighted to win the Commissioner’s Cup for the third year in a row for having the best athletic record in the Little East Conference,” said Eastern President Elsa Núñez. “Our student-athletes are bringing honor and recognition to the University while achieving great heights on the playing field.

“I am equally proud that our athletes take their studies seriously as they prepare for rewarding professional careers. Our student-athletes apply their teamwork skills, self-discipline and a commitment to excellence in and out of class on campus, and they demonstrate the same standards in athletic competition.

“For Eastern athletes to perform at a consistently high level across varsity sports in the conference is a tribute to them, their coaches and our Athletic Department. I could not be more proud of the Warriors!”

Eastern Connecticut Director of Athletics Lori Runksmeier added, “Eastern athletics has a long and proud tradition of success. Winning the LEC Commissioner’s Cup for the third year in a row is a result of the hard work our student-athletes and coaches have put in this year and is a testament to the support that athletics receives from the University. The Little East Conference is a strong league, and knowing we need to push ourselves to be competitive makes us better.”

Eastern claimed the outright regular season title in men’s soccer, and was one of two programs to share the regular season championship in men’s basketball and women’s soccer. The Warriors were second in the conference standings in women’s basketball and women’s cross country, and totaled four third-place finishes – men’s and women’s outdoor track and field, softball, and women’s swimming and diving. Only two of Eastern’s 17 programs placed lower than fourth in the LEC standings in 2018-19.

“Congratulations to the Eastern Connecticut State University administration, coaches and student-athletes on earning three Commissioner’s Cups (the LEC’s highest athletic award) in a row,” said Little East Commissioner Cora H.L. Brumley. “The Warriors exemplify the NCAA Division III philosophy by consistently excelling both on and off the field of play.”

The University of Southern Maine finished second in the 2018-19 Commissioner’s Cup standings, followed by Keene State College, UMass Dartmouth, Plymouth State University, Rhode Island College, UMass Boston, Western Connecticut State University and Castleton University.

Written by Ed Osborn

Eastern at Small College Rugby Association All-Star Championships

(l to r) Josh Synott, Brad Marston, Nate Tozzi and Kodey Duplissie

Four Eastern Connecticut State University rugby players represented the Northeast on the National Select Side at the National Small College Rugby Association All-Star Championships in Houston May 23-28. Of the hundreds of schools in the Northeast that qualified for this distinction, Eastern rugby was afforded the opportunity of having four of its players selected. The Eastern players participated in five matches over thee days, with the Northeast team they were on placing second.

‘Eastern Celebrates’ Alumni at Annual Reunion Weekend

The class of 1969 leads the Alumni March to the Big Tent BBQ.
The annual Young Alumni Bash commences at Blarney's.
Alumni, families and President Núñez gather for lunch in the Big Tent BBQ.
Hundreds of the Eastern community enjoy lunch.
Alumni, including the jubilee class of 1969, gather for a reception in the Student Center Cafe.
Alumni from the 80s, 90s and 00s celebrate at Blarney's during the Reunion Happy Hour.
Graduate students are honored during the Hooding Ceremony.
Graduates from the past 10 years gather at Blarney's for the Young Alumni Bash.

 

Hundreds of alumni converged on the Eastern Connecticut State University campus on May 17–18 for the 14th annual Eastern Celebrates reunion weekend. The class of 1969 celebrated its 50th reunion as graduates young and old partook in festivities on and off campus.

The weekend kicked off Friday night as graduates from the past 10 years gathered at Blarney’s for the annual Young Alumni Bash.

Saturday morning opened with a jubilee reception for the class of 1969 in the Student Center Café. President Elsa Núñez congratulated the jubilee class and gave them golden diplomas.

The morning continued with guided tours of campus, the newly reopened Communication Building and the Fine Arts Instructional Center—with a pitstop in the Art Gallery for an exhibition of student art work.

The festivities shifted focus midmorning to graduate students during their hooding ceremony, which celebrated soon-to-be graduates from master’s programs in accounting, organizational management and education.

Lunchtime gathered all patrons to the Big Tent Barbecue for a spread of all-American classics. The class of 1969 led a parade of generations of alumni in a march to the barbecue. With class banners in hand, they entered the tent to music and cheering families.

Classes from the 80s, 90s and 00s closed the celebration at Blarney’s with a reunion happy hour.   

Eastern Graduates 1,250 Students at XL Center

Marilynn “Lynn” Malerba

Hartford, CT — Marilynn “Lynn” Malerba, chief of the Mohegan Tribe, told the 1,259 graduates at Eastern Connecticut State University’s 129th Commencement to “Allow yourself the faith to ‘dream ahead’ as you embrace the next chapter in your journey.” Noting that college graduates have greater job security, live longer and have greater social mobility, Malerba told the graduates that they had made “a smart decision” in pursuing their educational dreams.

The annual graduation ceremony was held at the XL Center in Hartford on May 21, with more than 12,000 family members and friends cheering on their sons and daughters, brothers and sisters, as 1,175 undergraduates and 84 graduate students received their diplomas.

Malerba told the graduates “Your education has just begun, as you have ‘birthed’ a career that will only grow and mature over time.” She also reminded graduates to set aside time for the “keepers of your heart” — family and friends who share life’s challenges. “When you meet others on the path of life, offer a kind word, encourage someone, comfort someone, and celebrate someone’s joy.”

The commencement speaker also received an honorary doctor of science degree from Eastern in a special hooding ceremony during the graduation exercises. 

Malerba was appointed the 18th Chief of the Mohegan Tribe in August 2010, becoming the first female chief in the tribe’s modern history. She previously was chair of the tribal council and executive director of health and human services for the tribal government.

Prior to her leadership roles in the Mohegan Tribe, Malerba served as director of cardiology and pulmonary services at Lawrence + Memorial Hospital. She earned her Doctor of Nursing Practice from Yale University and her master’s degree in public administration from the University of Connecticut.

In addition to a distinguished career as a registered nurse and her leadership positions with the Mohegan Tribe, Malerba is also a national advocate of health issues and the welfare of Native Peoples. She serves in a number of national roles, including positions with the Federal Indian Health Services; the U.S. Department of Justice; and the National Institutes of Health.

Other speakers at the Commencement exercises included Eastern President Elsa Núñez; Merle Harris, vice-chair of the

President Elsa Núñez

Board of Regents for Higher Education; and Mark Ojakian, president of the Connecticut State Colleges and Universities System. Additional members of the platform party included Justin Murphy ’98, president of the ECSU Foundation; Father Laurence LaPointe; and other Eastern officials.

“The most important lesson I hope you have learned at Eastern is the knowledge that our great American democracy is only great because of the involvement and participation of our citizens,” said Núñez. “Being a citizen means debating the issues with your friends and in public forums — wherever you get a chance to voice your opinion. Most importantly, be willing to say no to whatever doesn’t feel right.

“You have learned how to think critically on our campus. You have learned how to ask questions, conduct research and analyze the results.  Do this in your workplace, in your community, and as a citizen of our great country.  I know you can do it . . . and I am counting on you to do so.  We need your enthusiasm, commitment and knowledge more than ever.”

More than 40 percent of the graduates were the first in their families to earn a bachelor’s degree. As Connecticut’s only public liberal arts university, Eastern draws students from 160 of the state’s 169 towns, with approximately 85 percent of graduates staying in Connecticut to launch their careers, contribute to their communities and raise their families.

Senior Class President Michael Theriault (right)

Senior Class President Michael Theriault presented the Senior Class Gift to President Núñez — an annual Class of 2019 scholarship — and thanked his classmates’ families, friends and faculty for supporting the senior class in its journey. He recalled registering for classes in the early morning hours, “trying to stay silent on the third floor of the library” and Thursday night pancakes. Looking to the future, Theriault said the arena floor was a sea of graduation caps, but “While they may look the same from the outside, the reality is that we all will wear different hats. Some of us will go on to be future educators and make differences in the lives of students. Others will become journalists, historians, psychologists, broadcasters and so much more. No matter what hat you will wear, we will all be Eastern Warriors now and forever.”

In speaking on behalf of the Board of Regents for Higher Education, Vice-Chair Merle Harris reminded the audience that “commencement” means “beginning.” She told the graduates they “have gained the skills needed to make wise decisions. . .” and were ready to “make your community, our state, and our nation a better place. I am gratified that I can greet you tonight as you begin the next phase of your life’s journey.”

CSCU President Ojakian also offered remarks. Pointing to the “transformational academic journey you have just completed,” he called the graduates “change agents for the future and the next generation of leaders.” Ojakian went on to say, “Connecticut needs bright, talented individuals to stay here, fill the jobs of the 21st century, purchase homes, and raise their families here in the state. Connecticut needs your creativity, your entrepreneurial spirit and your ingenuity. You are the future of Connecticut — and because of that, Connecticut’s future is bright.”

From the colorful Governor’s Foot Guard Color Guard in attendance, to the piercing sound of the bagpipes of the St. Patrick’s Pipe Band and the pre-event music of the Thread City Brass Quintet, this year’s graduation ceremonies reflected Eastern’s longstanding Commencement traditions.

University Senate President Andrew Utterback presided over the commencement exercises; seniors Andrew Hofmann, Tiara Lussier, Austin Stone, Ryan Michaud and Sara Ann Vega sang “America the Beautiful”; senior Shawn Ray Dousis gave the invocation; and Environmental Earth Science Professor Dickson Cunningham was recognized as the 2019 Distinguished Professor Award recipient.

Written by Ed Osborn

Senior Exhibition Spotlights Graduating Student Artists

 

The versatile talents of more than 30 Eastern Connecticut State University art majors were featured in the 2019 Senior Art Exhibition. The exhibition ran from May 10–21 in the Art Gallery of the Fine Arts Instructional Center and kicked off with an opening reception on May 9.

The event, which welcomed senior artists to discuss their work with gallery visitors, represented digital art and design, painting and drawing, printmaking and sculpture concentrations. Projects ranged from animated videos to photographs and displayed cultural, academic and personal influences.

Kelsey Kirkendall ’19 captured the people in her life to create “Delicate Exposure,” a digital art series that was created based on a survey of friends’ perceived qualities. “I really wanted to showcase my closest friends and highlight their biggest insecurities alongside the best parts of them,” she said. Her goal was to explore unseen parts of being human, reinforcing openness and encouraging self-assurance.

 

“Everybody has their own style shown through what they’re making, so it’s a very diverse collection even for those of us in the same classes. That’s what makes this gallery cool,” said Jake Ayotte ’19, another student inspired by the intricacies of humanity. His piece is a CD cover titled “VII,” combining his interest in art and music in an artistic interpretation of the seven deadly sins.

“Seeing all the work of my peers come to life is great,” Jevaughn Lindo ’19 noted, recognizing growth brought on by artistic challenges and successes. “It’s like metamorphosis.” He presented an animated project, “Art Squad,” which required bone animation, or giving the characters skeletons. Creative decisions were driven by the role of cartoons in his life.

Erika Groleau ’19 also incorporated parts of herself into her art, producing a board game called “CAT-astrophe.” She used her familiarity with different game styles and experiences as a cat owner to create it. “The best part was really showing myself that I was able to accomplish this,” said Groleau, who received engaging feedback at the reception. “When I stand there, people tell me about their cats.” She would like to expand the project in the future.

Aiming for a similar connection as an artist to the audience, Joshua Philippas ’19 designed “Lost Looks,” an affordable streetwear clothing line. “I wanted to think outside of the box and make something that people could relate to,” he explained. Articles in the line include lightly colored cropped T-shirts and hoodies, achieving a relaxed but stylish appearance.

Written by Jordan Corey

Year-End Student Activity Enriches Campus

Fashion Forward. Photo courtesy of club.
Fashion Forward. Photo courtesy of club.
Fashion Forward. Photo courtesy of club.
Repertory Dance Troupe (RDT). Photo courtesy of club.
Repertory Dance Troupe (RDT). Photo courtesy of club.
Repertory Dance Troupe (RDT). Photo courtesy of club.
Natural Hair Club. Photo courtesy of club.
Natural Hair Club. Photo courtesy of club.
Natural Hair Club. Photo courtesy of club.
Key of She. Photo courtesy of club.

 

The end of the academic year is not only crunch time for final projects and exams, it’s also a busy time when Eastern’s many student organizations host year-end events. April and May have had a plethora of vibrant student activities, ranging from fashion shows to carnivals to Asian festivals. Below are a few of the clubs that are closing spring 2019 with a bang.

Fashion Forward held its annual fashion show on April 13 at Windham High School. The club aims to inform and educate Eastern students about the latest fashion trends.

The Repertory Dance Troupe (RDT) held its spring showcase on April 27 at Windham High School. The showcase featured originally choreographed pieces by club members. The club presented big-group pieces (30 or more people), small group dances (15 people), combos (3–6 people), duets and solos. The styles of dances included lyrical, modern, hip hop, jazz and tap. RDT presents a showcase every semester.

The Natural Hair Club hosted its first hair show on April 28 in the Student Center.  The club empowers and uplifts the natural hair community on campus by organizing events that focus on hair hygiene and maintenance, lifestyle tips, hair styles and hacks, skin care and more. “We recognize the trials and tribulations that come with having natural hair,” writes the club. “We want the Eastern community to take pride in their hair in its natural state. Culturally, everybody’s hair is different. We all should love our hair no matter the roots it comes from.”

The Music Society’s acapella group “Key of She” held its annual concert on April 26 in the Student Center. The club educates students about the different aspects of music and enhances the musical experiences of the Eastern community.

Springfest carnival. Photo courtesy of CAB.
Springfest carnival. Photo courtesy of CAB.
Springfest carnival. Photo courtesy of CAB.
Asian Cultural Society. Photo courtesy of the club.
Asian Cultural Society. Photo courtesy of the club.
Asian Cultural Society. Photo courtesy of the club.
Lt. Gov. Susan Bysiewicz speaks at the College Democrats' "Political Intelligence" event. Photo courtesy of the club.
College Democrats. Photo Courtesy of the club.
College Democrats. Photo Courtesy of the club.
African Club fashion show. Photo courtesy of club.
African Club fashion show. Photo courtesy of club.

 

The Campus Activity Board (CAB) held its annual carnival and fireworks display on May 4. Featuring a Ferris wheel, scrambler and cotton candy, the carnival wrapped up Springfest, a week of festivities that included a dunk tank, virtual-reality roller coasters and other activities.  

The Asian Cultural Society celebrated “Holi,” a popular Hindu festival in India and Nepal that involves throwing colored powders and water in celebration of the start of spring. Hosted on April 29 on the Webb Lawn, this was the fourth year the club has celebrated the festival on campus.

The College Democrats hosted an event titled “Political Intelligence” in collaboration with the Quiet Corner Democrats on April 27. The event featured nine panels concerning topics such as immigration and gun control. Guests included Lt. Gov. Susan Bysiewicz, Deputy Secretary of State Scott Bates, Agriculture Commissioner Bryan Hurlburt, Senior Advisor of the Department of Energy and Environmental Protection James Albis, State Senator Cathy Osten and State Reps. Susan Johnson, Greg Haddad, Mike Winkler, Pat Boyd and Pat Wilson Pheanious.

The African Club hosted a fashion show on April 27. The club promotes interest in the history, development and cultures of Africa, and organizes related service projects and events for the Eastern community.

Written by Michael Rouleau

Eastern Theatre Takes Spectators on a Journey ‘To Damascus’

“Here, Strindberg’s vision is closer to a nightmare,” writes Director David Pellegrini of the author. “This is particularly evident in the horror-tinged scenes in the first part (of the trilogy).”

Eastern Connecticut State University’s fine arts building was transformed into a performance venue at large as “To Damascus” brought spectators on a stage-hopping journey from April 23–28. The main-stage production was based on August Strindberg’s seminal trilogy “The Road to Damascus” and adapted/directed by Theatre Professor David Pellegrini.

The show follows a man on a fascinating and sometimes terrifying spiritual journey. Small groups of viewers followed the journey through scenes in multiple settings throughout the Fine Arts Instructional Center — including the building’s three performance venues, main lobby, rear loading dock and select classrooms.

The traveling, multi-venue format of “To Damascus” mimics the approach of medieval-cycle plays (a medieval type of theatre), in which theatregoers visited “stations” throughout town. The play also extends the palindromic structure — in which the protagonist passes through several settings, then returns to them in reverse order —  to the entire trilogy.

 

The trilogy’s pieces are rarely produced together — even in Strindberg’s homeland of Sweden. Pellegrini writes in his director’s notes: “The trilogy contains many stylistic innovations and offers a penetrating exploration of creativity, human potential and the causes for — and possible remedies to — human suffering.

“I have long been intrigued by the possibilities of an interdisciplinary production of ‘To Damascus,’” he added, “and university theatre is perhaps the most appropriate setting for its incubation. This is, in part, due to the myriad opportunities for recontextualizing the ‘Stranger’s journey’ in light of present-day concerns, but also because it provides a potent vehicle for student actors, designers and technicians to practice nontraditional production processes afforded by new media/performance technology.”

The cast and crew of “To Damascus” are Eastern students who are enrolled in the capstone course “Experimental Theatre.” The production features theatre majors as actors, designers and technicians, as well as new-media studies students who have created the media content alongside faculty mentor-artists.

Written by Michael Rouleau

Music Program Holds Numerous Performances, Honors Recital

April Concerts

Eastern professors Anthony Cornicello and Rick O’Neal, with drummer Venlo Odom, presented a night of standard jazz repertoire as part of the Music Program’s Faculty Recital Series on April 5.
“Sounds of Korea” featured traditional and contemporary music and culture from Korea on April 6. The event included a Samul percussion ensemble, classical art music and K-pop.
On April 11, guest ensemble Cuatro Puntos present a program of Persian classical music for the santoor and string quartet written by Dr. Reza Vali.
The Eastern Concert Chorale presented “Requiem for the Living” on April 22.
The Eastern Concert Band presented a festive spring program of standards and newer music for wind band on April 24.
Eastern Jazz Ensemble will present an evening of music on April 29.

 

May Concerts

Eastern’s Brass Ensemble presented its inaugural concert on May 1.
A variety of percussion ensembles performed on May 5 during their annual spring concert.
On May 6, Eastern’s jazz combo “3 o’clock Band” presented classic jazz tunes from a variety of eras, ranging from standards and bebop to contemporary jazz and rock.
On May 7, students enrolled in Chamber Music Repertoire presented a recital of music from the Baroque period to the present.
The World Percussion Concert showcased the rich history of drumming in Korea, West Africa, the Middle East and the Americas on May 8.
Eastern professors Anthony Cornicello and Rick O’Neal, with drummer Venlo Odom, presented a night of standard jazz repertoire as part of the Music Program’s Faculty Recital Series on April 5.

 

Honors Music Recital

 

On April 14, the Music Program presented its annual honors recital and awards ceremony in the Concert Hall of the Fine Arts Instructional Center. The event featured a recital by six students who were recognized by the Music Program for their excellence in performance. This year’s honorees were Hannah Avena (trombone) ’21, Adella Carlson (clarinet) ’20, Abigail Edelman (piano) ’20, Emily Miclon (percussion) ’19, Eric Peterson (guitar) ’20 and Austin Stone (tenor) ’19.