State of the University: Eastern to be ‘Market Smart, Mission Driven’

The fall University Meeting opened the 2019-20 academic year on August 26 as President Elsa Núñez described the new reality of the higher education marketplace and laid out her vision for Eastern’s future. More than 300 faculty and staff converged on the Betty R. Tipton Room for the meeting, which also welcomed more than 30 new hires and honored 17 longstanding colleagues who are retiring or were receiving service awards.

The theme of the president’s State of the University Address was “Market Smart; Mission Driven”—a strategy of responding to the changing higher education marketplace while remaining true to Eastern’s public liberal arts mission.

“The higher education marketplace is changing,” said Núñez, “as are the demographics of the people we serve, creating a new reality that knocks loudly at our door.”

Núñez described a reality that includes fewer students graduating from high school, declining state funding, and a new generation of young adults with different interests and expectations.

Speaking to declining state funding, she said that in 1990, more than 60 percent of Eastern’s operating budget was funded by the State of Connecticut. Now the university gets less than 40 percent.

Staff and faculty who were honored for years of service and retirement. Front row, left to right: Drew Hyatt (20 years), Kristalyn Salters-Pedneault (10 years), Jutta Ares (retirement), Denise Bierly (25 years), Weiping Liu (retirement). Back row: Walter Diaz (20 years), Mohd Rujoub (20 years), Jeffrey Danforth (retirement), Angela Bazin (20 years), Rita Malenczyk (25 years), David Pellgrini (20 years), Kim Dugan (20 years), Theresa Severance (20 years), Michelle Bacholle (20 years).

As enrollments are down nationwide for public universities, Núñez added, “For the next five years, we can expect an additional two to three percent annual decline in the number of high school graduates, which is an additional 10–15 percent on top of the downward national trend we’ve already seen.”

Despite these fiscal and demographic challenges, Núñez assured the audience that Eastern is on solid footing, as the university has managed its budget frugally in recent years by cautiously filling vacancies—hiring only the most essential student- and safety-focused positions. Eastern has also saved money through green-energy practices, cutting costs across campus and other initiatives of the Ad Hoc Budget Committee.

The past decade of fiscal restraint has resulted in a reserves fund of $28 million—the third largest in the state university system, albeit being the smallest school.

“Until now we have been able to grow our reserves without having to reach into our savings to balance the budget,” said Núñez. “This is not by choice, but this is exactly why we worked hard to build a healthy reserve. Without your past sacrifices, we would not be in position to do so.”

Causes for turning to the reserves fund this year include lower enrollment; a reduction in state funding for fringe benefits; pay raises as negotiated by bargaining units; the hiring of essential new staff; and increased utilities costs due to the reopening of two new buildings. 

Núñez also listed ways the university can be “market smart.” She said Eastern can continue to offer new majors — citing recent additions such as health sciences, criminology and finance — as well as modernize existing programs to ensure they meet workplace needs.

She also described increased recruitment efforts toward adult learners as well as tapping into new markets, such as New York, New Jersey and Puerto Rico.

Núñez particularly focused on the importance of retaining current students, outlining retention efforts that include a new advising model that engages all students—particularly transfer students and undeclared majors—and using data analytics to track student progress.

In challenging times, Núñez emphasized the importance of staying “mission driven”—offering a public liberal arts education with a focus on applied learning.

“We believe that the liberal arts offer the best intellectual tools we can provide students, skills highly sought by U.S. employers,” she said. Priorities moving forward include ensuring that all students experience hands-on learning — such as internships and research — and know how to articulate their education when applying for jobs.

Speaking to the “public” aspect of a state university, Núñez said, “Our responsibility to the citizens of Connecticut and to serving students from all walks of life is the bedrock of our mission.”

The president said that Eastern will maintain its high admission standards. “We can be elite without being elitist,” she said, pointing out that 30 percent of the student body are people of color and 88 percent of students receive financial aid.

“This moment in our history will define our future,” said Núñez in closing. “We have an opportunity to forge a new identity, focused on improving the quality of every aspect of our educational enterprise, while staying true to the public, liberal arts and experiential learning elements of our mission.”

Written by Michael Rouleau

‘College Consensus’ Ranks Eastern Among Best Colleges

College Consensus, a college review aggregator that combines the latest results from the most respected college ranking systems with actual reviews of college students, has recognized Eastern Connecticut State University for the second year in a row. Eastern has been ranked among the “Best Colleges and Universities in Connecticut for 2019” and the “Best Regional Universities in the North for 2019.”

“Congratulations on making the Best Regional Universities in the North for 2019 and Best Colleges and Universities in Connecticut for 2019,” said Carole Taylor, marketing director for the College Consensus. “Your inclusion in the lists shows that you are making an impact on students that will have a transformative effect on their lives and the lives of others.”

Eastern began in 1889 as a normal school preparing teachers for careers in Connecticut’s elementary schools. Today it is known as Connecticut’s public liberal arts university. Eastern is home to 5,200 students, with more than 90 percent of them coming from Connecticut.

To identify standout colleges, College Consensus averages the latest results from the most respected college ranking systems, including U.S. News and World Report, along with student reviews to produce a unique rating for each school. Read more about the organization’s methodology at: https://www.collegeconsensus.com/about.

To see Eastern’s College Consensus profile, visit https://www.collegeconsensus.com/school/eastern-connecticut-state-university.

Written by Vania Galicia

Eastern Expands Partnership with New Haven Promise Program

 Beginning with the fall 2020 semester, Eastern Connecticut State University will expand its partnership with the New Haven Promise program to provide opportunities to students receiving New Haven Promise scholarships who are attending Eastern.

Starting with the high school graduating class of 2020, Eastern will provide $5,000 in a matching grant to each New Haven Promise student attending Eastern, in addition to any need-based financial aid they receive. New Haven Promise Scholars will also have a guaranteed job on Eastern’s campus, gaining valuable work experience while earning additional income to support their college education.

This guarantee of an on-campus job means that every New Haven Promise Scholar will be gaining important employability skills during their time at Eastern, with their work supervisor serving as a mentor and guide. Many on-campus jobs – graphic designers, writers, lab assistants – are also directly linked to students’ majors, so they will be able to put those jobs on their resumes as indicators of skills related to their career field.

Eastern will also assign a full-time advisor to New Haven Promise scholars to provide them with the support they need to transition to college.

“Providing educational access to first-generation students is central to Eastern’s mission,” said Eastern President Elsa Núñez. “This expansion of our partnership with the New Haven Promise program is another way we can fulfill our commitment to serving students from all backgrounds. We are excited about the opportunity to have more students from New Haven making their special contributions to our campus community.”

President Elsa Núñez announces Eastern’s commitment to New Haven Promise on June 21 at the Yale School of Management.

While the new agreement with the New Haven Promise represents a step forward, with added support on Eastern’s campus for New Haven Promise Scholars, students from the program have been attending Eastern for the past eight years. Over that time, 43 New Haven Promise Scholars have been admitted to Eastern, becoming leaders on campus while pursuing college degrees and aspiring to professional careers.

New Haven Mayor Toni Harp lauded Eastern for the new partnership with New Haven Promise and said Eastern has a favored reputation among students for being a “caring” campus. Harp described educational access as nothing less than “a community’s moral commitment to its children,” and said programs like the New Haven Promise scholarship program “pay dividends to the next generation.”

New Haven Promise President Patricia Melton shared graduation data with the audience, indicating that 88 percent of the first four graduating classes of New Haven Promise students attended a four-year college or university. The college graduation rate of those students was 65 percent, higher than the Connecticut and U.S. averages. Students attending public four-year universities in Connecticut like Eastern graduated at a higher rate (68 percent) than those attending a private institution.

Written by Ed Osborn

Eastern Alumna Salutes Inclusive Excellence Award Winners

On May 9, Eastern recognized more than 100 students with a 3.5 cumulative grade point average or higher, and an additional 11 students who have demonstrated exemplary co-curricular engagement at the University’s Seventh Annual Inclusive Excellence Student Awards Ceremony. The ceremony recognized the achievements of African, Latino, Asian and Native American (ALANA) students at Eastern.

Eastern President Elsa Núñez said the ceremony was not just about inclusion, but also spoke to the University’s other core values of academic excellence, integrity, social responsibility, engagement and empowerment. “It is important for each of you to stand tall and be proud of who you are and what you are capable of. Never, ever, ever let anyone attempt to diminish your worth or your talents.

“Today’s honorees join thousands of other successful Eastern alumni who are making their own personal contributions out in the real world, including our guest speaker today, Dr. Kawami Evans. Today, we show respect and celebrate the accomplishments of students who too often have been forgotten in the past.  Thank you for being part of this celebration; to our honorees, congratulations.  We are very proud of you.”

Keynote speaker Evans ’97 serves as associate director at the Center for African Diaspora Student Success at the University of California at Davis. She earned her bachelor’s degree in history and social science at Eastern, her Master of Education in educational policy and research administration from the University of Massachusetts-Amherst and a doctorate in educational management and leadership from Drexel University.

Evans encouraged the students to use their curiosity and optimism to persevere through unseen psychological struggles that can become their staunchest challenges. She said many high- achieving students fall prey to chasing individual achievements, accolades or material gain as their goal, even confusing their self-worth with what they can accomplish.

“This is dangerous; it can lead to anxiety and depression. Don’t let this be your reality or focus,” said Evans. “Who you are is what we are celebrating today. All the earned accolades you are receiving are but a byproduct of the brilliance within you . . . You are the promise of our ancestors’ prayers and walk with the wisdom and swag of those who have grit, resilience, the social and emotional intelligence, curiosity and hope.”

Evans told the students the most important element they need to resurrect in discussing their future success is their spirituality, ways in which students discover their destiny — answers to the big questions of who they are, what is their life purpose and how do they make difference in the world.

“Much of the world right now is relegated to systems and polices. We have to raise the bar with our vision of what’s possible,” Evans said. “It will take hard work, community, love, bravery, unrelentless effort and celebration.  I sincerely believe that we can create a world that works for all.”

A total of 280 students qualified for an Academic Excellence Award with a 3.5 cumulative GPA or higher, and more than 100 of them were able to attend the May 9 event. During the ceremony, several students received service awards. Adrianna Arocho and Mayra Santos Acosta was presented the Volunteer Service Award; Aiyana Ward, the Athletic Excellence Award; Kimberly Allen and Sommer Bachelor, the Career Development Award; Jenilee Antonetty, the Resident Assistant Diversity Impact Award; Rafael Aragon, the Residential Community Leadership Award; Tristan Perez, the Social Justice Advocacy Award; Emma Costa, the Inspirational Leadership Award; Ishah Azeez, the Resilient Warrior Award; Kimberly Allen and Vishal Jungiwalla, the Advisor’s Choice Award; and the Freedom at Eastern Club, the Building Bridges Award.

By Dwight Bachman

Eastern Graduates 1,250 Students at XL Center

Marilynn “Lynn” Malerba

Hartford, CT — Marilynn “Lynn” Malerba, chief of the Mohegan Tribe, told the 1,259 graduates at Eastern Connecticut State University’s 129th Commencement to “Allow yourself the faith to ‘dream ahead’ as you embrace the next chapter in your journey.” Noting that college graduates have greater job security, live longer and have greater social mobility, Malerba told the graduates that they had made “a smart decision” in pursuing their educational dreams.

The annual graduation ceremony was held at the XL Center in Hartford on May 21, with more than 12,000 family members and friends cheering on their sons and daughters, brothers and sisters, as 1,175 undergraduates and 84 graduate students received their diplomas.

Malerba told the graduates “Your education has just begun, as you have ‘birthed’ a career that will only grow and mature over time.” She also reminded graduates to set aside time for the “keepers of your heart” — family and friends who share life’s challenges. “When you meet others on the path of life, offer a kind word, encourage someone, comfort someone, and celebrate someone’s joy.”

The commencement speaker also received an honorary doctor of science degree from Eastern in a special hooding ceremony during the graduation exercises. 

Malerba was appointed the 18th Chief of the Mohegan Tribe in August 2010, becoming the first female chief in the tribe’s modern history. She previously was chair of the tribal council and executive director of health and human services for the tribal government.

Prior to her leadership roles in the Mohegan Tribe, Malerba served as director of cardiology and pulmonary services at Lawrence + Memorial Hospital. She earned her Doctor of Nursing Practice from Yale University and her master’s degree in public administration from the University of Connecticut.

In addition to a distinguished career as a registered nurse and her leadership positions with the Mohegan Tribe, Malerba is also a national advocate of health issues and the welfare of Native Peoples. She serves in a number of national roles, including positions with the Federal Indian Health Services; the U.S. Department of Justice; and the National Institutes of Health.

Other speakers at the Commencement exercises included Eastern President Elsa Núñez; Merle Harris, vice-chair of the

President Elsa Núñez

Board of Regents for Higher Education; and Mark Ojakian, president of the Connecticut State Colleges and Universities System. Additional members of the platform party included Justin Murphy ’98, president of the ECSU Foundation; Father Laurence LaPointe; and other Eastern officials.

“The most important lesson I hope you have learned at Eastern is the knowledge that our great American democracy is only great because of the involvement and participation of our citizens,” said Núñez. “Being a citizen means debating the issues with your friends and in public forums — wherever you get a chance to voice your opinion. Most importantly, be willing to say no to whatever doesn’t feel right.

“You have learned how to think critically on our campus. You have learned how to ask questions, conduct research and analyze the results.  Do this in your workplace, in your community, and as a citizen of our great country.  I know you can do it . . . and I am counting on you to do so.  We need your enthusiasm, commitment and knowledge more than ever.”

More than 40 percent of the graduates were the first in their families to earn a bachelor’s degree. As Connecticut’s only public liberal arts university, Eastern draws students from 160 of the state’s 169 towns, with approximately 85 percent of graduates staying in Connecticut to launch their careers, contribute to their communities and raise their families.

Senior Class President Michael Theriault (right)

Senior Class President Michael Theriault presented the Senior Class Gift to President Núñez — an annual Class of 2019 scholarship — and thanked his classmates’ families, friends and faculty for supporting the senior class in its journey. He recalled registering for classes in the early morning hours, “trying to stay silent on the third floor of the library” and Thursday night pancakes. Looking to the future, Theriault said the arena floor was a sea of graduation caps, but “While they may look the same from the outside, the reality is that we all will wear different hats. Some of us will go on to be future educators and make differences in the lives of students. Others will become journalists, historians, psychologists, broadcasters and so much more. No matter what hat you will wear, we will all be Eastern Warriors now and forever.”

In speaking on behalf of the Board of Regents for Higher Education, Vice-Chair Merle Harris reminded the audience that “commencement” means “beginning.” She told the graduates they “have gained the skills needed to make wise decisions. . .” and were ready to “make your community, our state, and our nation a better place. I am gratified that I can greet you tonight as you begin the next phase of your life’s journey.”

CSCU President Ojakian also offered remarks. Pointing to the “transformational academic journey you have just completed,” he called the graduates “change agents for the future and the next generation of leaders.” Ojakian went on to say, “Connecticut needs bright, talented individuals to stay here, fill the jobs of the 21st century, purchase homes, and raise their families here in the state. Connecticut needs your creativity, your entrepreneurial spirit and your ingenuity. You are the future of Connecticut — and because of that, Connecticut’s future is bright.”

From the colorful Governor’s Foot Guard Color Guard in attendance, to the piercing sound of the bagpipes of the St. Patrick’s Pipe Band and the pre-event music of the Thread City Brass Quintet, this year’s graduation ceremonies reflected Eastern’s longstanding Commencement traditions.

University Senate President Andrew Utterback presided over the commencement exercises; seniors Andrew Hofmann, Tiara Lussier, Austin Stone, Ryan Michaud and Sara Ann Vega sang “America the Beautiful”; senior Shawn Ray Dousis gave the invocation; and Environmental Earth Science Professor Dickson Cunningham was recognized as the 2019 Distinguished Professor Award recipient.

Written by Ed Osborn

State Legislators Speak with Eastern Community

Legislators

State Sen. Dan Champagne, SGA President Francesco Ricigliano, State Rep. Doug Dubitsky, President Nunez, State Rep. Susan Johnson, Leigh Appleby, CSCU communication director, and Alexandra Beaudoin, CSCU government relations director

State Sen. Dan Champagne ’94, State Rep. Susan Johnson ’77 and State Rep. Doug Dubitsky took time from their busy schedules to visit Eastern Connecticut State University on April 23 for a breakfast in the Art Gallery of the Fine Arts Instructional Center. Eastern President Elsa Núñez thanked the legislators for their support and pointed to the fine arts center, as well as other new or remodeled facilities, as examples of how legislators have helped create a positive environment for Eastern students. She also indicated that Eastern’s academic reputation continues to improve—citing U.S. News and World Report rankings—and said the institution’s retention rate of 80 percent was at an all-time high.

Dubitsky said he was amazed at the growth that has occurred at Eastern, while State Sen. Champagne said he and his wife, a 1990 graduate, were forever grateful for the education they had received at Eastern. 

Alumnus Shawn Meaike ’95 was also on hand to greet the legislators. Meaike is founder of Family First Life, a national financial services company headquartered in Connecticut with more than $200 million in sales. He said “Eastern changed my life” and indicated he hires a fair share of Eastern graduates because he trusts what they have learned. “I am proud to say that my daughter will be attending Eastern this coming fall!” Meaike has also endowed the Family First Life Endowed Scholarship to support students with financial need from New London County.

SGA President Francesco Ricigliano thanked Provost William Salka, former professor of political science, and his colleagues for “challenging me academically,” especially in learning to write professionally. Ricigliano said Eastern’s faculty and staff were very supportive of students: “Because of them, Eastern feels like home!” 

Mohegan Tribal Chief Named Eastern’s Commencement Speaker

 Marilynn “Lynn” Malerba, chief of the Mohegan Tribe, will be the Commencement Speaker at Eastern Connecticut State University’s 129th Commencement Exercises on May 21 at the XL Center in Hartford. Malerba will also receive an honorary doctorate degree at the ceremonies.

Malerba has achieved an exemplary career in the health care and tribal governance fields. Not only has she served her community with distinction, she has brought national recognition to the State of Connecticut.

Chief Mutáwi Mutáhash (Many Hearts) Marilynn “Lynn” Malerba became the 18th Chief of the Mohegan Tribe on August 15, 2010, and is the first female chief in the tribe’s modern history. The position is a lifetime appointment made by the tribe’s council of elders. She previously served as chairwoman of the tribal council and was also executive director of health and human services for the tribal government.

Prior to her work for the Mohegan Tribe, Chief Malerba had a distinguished career as a registered nurse and served as director of cardiology and pulmonary services at Lawrence and Memorial Hospital. She earned her Doctor of Nursing Practice degree at Yale University and was named a Jonas Scholar. She holds a master’s degree in Public Administration from the University of Connecticut, and has an honorary doctorate from the University of St. Joseph in West Hartford.

Chief Malerba has achieved a national reputation as an advocate and supporter of health issues and the welfare of Native Peoples. She is chairwoman of the Tribal Self-Governance Advisory Committee of the Federal Indian Health Services; is a member of the U.S. Justice Department’s Tribal Nations Leadership Council; serves on the Tribal Advisory Committee for the National Institute of Health; is a member of the U.S. Treasury Department’s Tribal Advisory Committee; and serves as a technical expert on the Commission for Environmental Cooperation. She also serves as the United South and Eastern Tribes board of directors secretary, and is a member of the board of directors for the Ms. Foundation for Women.

In Connecticut, Chief Malerba serves as a trustee for Chelsea Groton Bank, as a board member for the Community Foundation of Eastern Connecticut, as an advisory committee member for the Harvard University Native American Program and served on the board of directors for Lawrence Memorial Hospital for 11 years.

More than 1,200 undergraduate and graduate students will receive their diplomas at Eastern’s graduation exercises on May 21, with an audience of more than 10,000 family and friends expected. In addition to Malerba, dignitaries expected to attend include Eastern President Elsa Núñez; Mark Ojakian, president of the Connecticut State Colleges and Universities System; and Merle Harris, vice-chair of the Board of Regents for Higher Education.

Written by Ed Osborn

Eastern Recognizes Ella Grasso Award Winners 2019

Left to right, community activist Anne Ash; Shawn Ray Dousis ’19; State Sen. Mae Flexer; June Dunn, assistant dean in the Office of Continuing Studies and Enhanced Learning at Eastern; and President Elsa Núñez

Shawn Ray Dousis ’19 of East Lyme, president of the Foundation for Campus Ministry at Eastern Connecticut State University; June Dunn, assistant dean in the Office of Continuing Studies and Enhanced Learning at Eastern; and community activist Anne Ash, were named recipients of Eastern’s annual Ella T. Grasso Distinguished Service Awards on March 27. The event took place in the Paul E. Johnson Sr. Community Conference Room of the J. Eugene Smith Library.

Dousis won the student award category. She will graduate this May with a Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education and a second major in Liberal Studies. At Eastern, she has served as a manager for Eastern’s men’s ice hockey team and as public relations officer of People Helping People. She currently serves as president of The Foundation for Campus Ministry. In 2017, Dousis established, planned, coordinated and facilitated “Shawn’s Cupboard,” Eastern’s Food Pantry.  The cupboard now serves many students, and has recently introduced a “Swipe It Forward” program that works through Chartwells, Eastern’s food service.  

Eastern President Elsa Núñez

“I am honored and grateful to have been chosen for this award and want to thank everyone involved for considering me,” said Dousis. “Our efforts with Shawn’s Cupboard have made food insecurity at Eastern less of a problem today than it was yesterday.”

Dunn won the faculty award. She has overseen the Bachelor of General Studies (BGS) program, along with several grant initiatives to assist students from marginalized communities in achieving their educational aspirations.  Prior to Eastern, she was the women studies conference and special events coordinator at Southern Connecticut State University. She also previously served as assistant to the director for the University of Connecticut’s Upward Bound Program, as well as Program Coordinator for Girls, Inc., in Stamford.

Dunn had an Ella T. Grasso story to tell. Her fifth-grade class at Hindley Elementary School suggested the sperm whale be made the state’s official animal. Hundreds of other schools and organizations across the state supported her, and Grasso signed the sperm whale bill in May 1975. Dunn eventually met the governor: “She was so authentic, down-to-earth and kind. This memory is why this award has additional special meaning and great honor to me.”

Rash, who won the community award, grew up in the 1940s and 1950s when girls playing basketball were limited to two bounces and could only play on half the court. Those challenges inspired Rash to become an educator, which provided a backdrop for working to make a difference in the lives of women and girls, locally and internationally. Her hands-on volunteer efforts include mentoring women in the Windham Area Interfaith Ministry (WAIM) Learning Partners Program; helping with fundraising efforts for Ecole Agape, the only free school for girls in Haiti; promoting the programs for women and girls as part of the Community Foundation of Eastern Connecticut (CFECT) Windham Women and Girls Fund; and encouraging literacy with Altrusa of Northeast Connecticut projects.

“It takes a village, so this award is shared with the people in this room,” said Rash. “My fellow awardees, my friends from Altrusa, the Windham Women and Girls Group, Ecole Agape School for Girls in  Haiti and the Community  Foundation, we all work together to make the world more equitable. We know that basketball has progressed, but there are still women who only have access to half court. We need to continue to work for full court access for all women!”

State Sen. Mae Flexer

In her welcoming remarks, Eastern President Elsa Núñez cited statistics showing women still earn “only $.81 for every dollar men make. Minority women make far less.” She engaged the audience in a series of cheers of “We Have Room to Grow!,” reminding those in attendance of “the special skills women possess.”

State Sen. Mae Flexer delivered the keynote address. Flexer said Grasso embodied what it means to live a life of commitment and service to others and to advocate for a more just and equal world. “Her dedication towards an issue like the underrepresentation of females in government – at a time when that issue was considered to be unimportant – is incredibly inspiring and meaningful, especially, as I stand here before you as a female elected official. She left an indelible mark on the state of Connecticut, but it also makes us think about our own legacy. In a hectic, ever-changing world, what are we doing to make our communities and our society just a bit better? I encourage everybody in this room to find what lights a spark within you and to pursue it. It may not always be easy, but it will always be worth it.”

Written by Dwight Bachman

Annual CREATE Conference to Showcase Student Art, Research

Eastern Connecticut State University will host its premier academic and artistic conference of the year on April 12. CREATE – Celebrating Research Excellence and Artistic Talent at Eastern – will take place from 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. in the Student Center and surrounding venues. An award ceremony with remarks by Eastern President Elsa Núñez will take place at 12:30 p.m. in the Betty R. Tipton Room of the Student Center.

Students present research during the poster session of the 2018 CREATE conference.

Hundreds of student researchers, artists and performers will present their talents at CREATE. Students from all majors will lead oral and poster presentations, participate in panel discussions, showcase music and dance performances, exhibit their art and photography, and present documentary films and more.

Registration will take place at 8 a.m. at the Student Center Café. President Núñez will present two undergraduate awards and two mentor awards to outstanding students and faculty members at the 12:30 p.m. award ceremony.

For more information, visit http://www.easternct.edu/create/, where you can view the day’s agenda and download the event’s cell phone app for iPhone and Android.

Written by Michael Rouleau