Renowned Scholar to Speak at Eastern

Written by Dwight Bachman

Pedro Noguera PHOTOWillimantic, CT—Pedro Noguera, distinguished professor of education at the Graduate School of Education and Information Studies at the University of California-Los Angeles (UCLA), as well as faculty director for UCLA’s Center for the Transformation of Schools, will lecture at Eastern Connecticut State University on Nov. 14. The event begins at 9 a.m. in the Concert Hall of the Fine Arts Instructional Center

Noguera’s scholarship and research focuses on ways that schools and their students are influenced by social and economic conditions and demographic trends. Noguera serves on the boards of many national and local organizations and appears as a regular commentator on educational issues on CNN, MSNBC, National Public Radio and other national news outlets.

Prior to joining the faculty at UCLA, Noguera served as the Peter L. Agnew Professor of Education at New York University and the executive director of the Metropolitan Center for Research on Equity and the Transformation of Schools; the Judith K. Dimon Professor of Communities and Schools at the Harvard Graduate School of Education; and as professor at the University of California, Berkeley, where he was also the director of the Institute for the Study of Social Change.

Noguera has also served as a trustee for the State University of New York (SUNY). In 2014, he was elected to the National Academy of Education. He recently received awards from the Center for the Advanced Study of the Behavioral Sciences, the National Association of Secondary Principals, and the McSilver Institute at NYU for his research and advocacy efforts aimed at fighting poverty. Noguera served as a classroom teacher in public schools in Providence, RI, and in Oakland, CA, and continues to work with schools nationally and internationally as a researcher and advisor.

Noguera has published more than 200 research articles, monographs and eports on topics such as urban school reform, conditions that promote student achievement, the role of education in community development, youth violence, and race and ethnic relations in American society. His work has appeared in multiple major research journals.  He is the author of several books, includingCity Schools and the American Dream”;  “Unfinished Business: Closing the Achievement Gap in Our Nation’s Schools”; “The Trouble With Black Boys…and Other Reflections on Race, Equity and the Future of Public Education”; and “Creating the Opportunity to Learn: Moving from Research to Practice to Close the Achievement Gap” with A. Wade Boykin. His most recent books are “Excellence Through Equity” with Alan Blankstein and “Race, Equity and Education: The Pursuit of Equality in Education 60 Years After Brown” with Jill Pierce and Roey Ahram.

Brad Davis Examines Bandits in China

Written by Jolene Potter

Bradley Davis

Bradley Davis

Bradley Davis, history professor at Eastern Connecticut State University, discussed his recently published book “Imperial Bandits: Outlaws and Rebels in the China-Vietnam Borderlands” in a book talk on Sept. 27.

Prior to writing the book, Davis conducted extensive archival and ethnographic research for more than a decade, traveling throughout China and Southeast Asia. Drawing on Vietnamese, French and Chinese written sources and interviews with hundreds of villagers, Davis tells the story of migrants and communities in the Southeast Asian borderlands. The book also describes banditry and the culture of violence in the mountainous borderlands between China and Vietnam.

The event, sponsored by the Department of History and the Office of Equity and Diversity, served as anDavis Book Cover Imperial Bandits opportunity for readers to ask questions and gain a further understanding of Davis’ research process. One of the themes in the conversation between Davis and readers included the establishment of personal relationships with the individuals you are studying. Davis noted that although archival research has become easier over time due to the expansion of access to documents, establishing personal relationships with the individuals you are studying is the key to comprehensive research. “You have to hang out,” says Davis. “As simple as that sounds it is not easy. You have to share a meal with them. You have to prove that you are not yet another researcher they will never see again. You have to become known and trusted in the community. Personal relationships are the heart of this type of research.”