Eastern a Top 25 Public Regional University in U.S. News and World Report

The class of 2023 gathered for a group photo during the Fall 2019 Warrior Welcome weekend–Eastern draws students from 160 of Connecticut’s 169 towns

 Eastern Connecticut State University is again the highest ranked institution among Connecticut’s four state universities in this year’s U.S. News and World Report’s edition of “Best Colleges.” The 2020 rankings were released on Sept. 9.

This is Eastern’s highest ranking ever as it was ranked 21st among public universities in the North Region. Eastern moved up five spots among public institutions over last year’s rankings and moved up 13 spots when both public and private institutions were considered.

Under the mentorship of Biology Professor Vijaykumar Veerappan, Roshani Budhathoki ’19 was selected for an undergraduate fellowship by the American Society of Plant Biologists (ASPB).

.The North Region includes colleges and universities from New England, New York, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Delaware and Maryland, and is known as the most competitive among the four regions that make up the U.S. News and World Report ranking system.

Regional universities such as Eastern are ranked based on 15 criteria that include peer assessment, graduation and retention rates, class size, faculty resources, admissions selectivity, financial resources and alumni giving.

“Given the uncertain times facing the higher education community, I am delighted to see Eastern achieving its highest ranking ever,” said Eastern President Elsa Nunez. “This is a testament to our commitment to high standards and the faculty and staff’s focus on providing students with personal attention. Our improved ranking this year is due to our rising graduation and retention rates as well as the continued quality of our incoming classes.

 Environmental earth science students traveled to the mountains of Wyoming and Idaho this summer for a geology field course led by Eastern faculty.:

“Students and their families turn to the Best Colleges rankings to help decide where to attend college. These newest rankings reaffirm that Eastern is providing a relevant and high-quality education on our beautiful residential campus.”

This year’s U.S. News and World Report rankings included reviews of upwards of 1,400 schools nationwide and are available at www.usnews.com/colleges. They will also be published in the Best Colleges 2020 Guidebook, published by U.S. News & World Report and available on newsstands on Oct. 15.

For the past 35 years, the U.S. News and World Report rankings, which group colleges based on categories created by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching, have grown to be the most comprehensive research tool for students and parents considering higher education opportunities.

Written by Ed Osborn

Eastern’s Sustainability Initiatives Recognized by National Organization

Sustainable CT stakeholders celebrate the soft launch of Sustainable CT in 2017 at Wickham Park, Manchester.:

 Eastern Connecticut State University has been highlighted for its sustainability efforts in the “2019 Sustainable Campus Index,” a publication of the Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education (AASHE). The index highlights innovative and high-impact initiatives at colleges and universities that submitted a Sustainability Tracking, Assessment & Rating System (STARS) report in the most recent calendar year.

The university was recognized as a “Highlighted Institution” for the Sustainable CT program managed by the Institute for Sustainable Energy at Eastern, as well as for being among the highest scorers among universities in the “Food and Dining” sustainability category.

“We are pleased with this recognition of our progress on sustainability at Eastern, and we realize that we have a lot of work ahead of us to achieve our climate and sustainability goals,” said Lynn Stoddard, executive director of the Institute for Sustainable Energy and chair of Eastern’s Green Campus Committee. “We are inspired by the sustainability accomplishments of our peers and continue to learn from each other.”

In 2018, the Institute for Sustainable Energy launched Sustainable CT, a voluntary certification program to support and recognize thriving and resilient Connecticut communities. The program offers a menu of best practice actions in nine broad categories, including equity and inclusion, local economies, arts and culture, and environmental stewardship. More than half of Connecticut’s municipalities participate in Sustainable CT and 22 towns and cities earned certification in the program’s first year.

In the Food and Dining category, Eastern was recognized as a top performer among colleges and universities. Chartwells, Eastern’s food service provider, has introduced a number of environmentally conscious initiatives, including a tray-less dining room and donations of surplus food to the local food pantry.

A recent “Zero Waste” barbeque luncheon featured an environmental theme, which emphasized reusable, recyclable or compostable materials to minimize waste. The event enhanced Eastern’s Green Campus Initiative and communities beyond Willimantic as well. Waste from the luncheon was taken to Quantum BioPower in Southington, where it was processed and turned into electricity to power the Southington Town Hall and the Southington police and fire stations.

Over the past few years, the use of reusable “to-go” containers has allowed more than 70,000 paper containers of pre- and post-consumer waste in Hurley Dining Hall to be composted by Quantum BioPower, which has reduced university trash output by nearly 70 percent.

Chartwells Food Services has supported other sustainable food systems by making low impact dining options available, educating customers about more sustainable options, offering meatless dining, and instituting sustainable food and beverage practices.

“Eastern’s dedication to environmental stewardship is evidenced by a range of sustainability efforts seen daily on our campus,” said Eastern President Elsa Núñez. “I am pleased that this green campus commitment has been recognized by the Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education (AASHE). As AASHE notes, the Sustainable CT initiative coordinated by Eastern’s Institute for Sustainability is an important contribution that we are making to our state. In addition, we appreciate AASHE’s recognition of the work Chartwells Dining Services is doing on our campus and in our community to promote lower energy consumption and greater food security. Such recognitions are gratifying and motivate us to continue our efforts to be good environmental stewards.”

“We are happy to highlight Eastern Connecticut State University in this year’s Sustainable Campus Index,” said AASHE’s Executive Director Meghan Fay Zahniser. “We hope that the stories contained in this year’s report will provide inspiration and ideas for other institutions to promote a more equitable and ecologically healthy future.”

Eastern’s STARS report is publicly available on the STARS website: https://reports.aashe.org/institutions/eastern-connecticut-state-university-ct/report/

Written by Dwight Bachman

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About Eastern

Eastern Connecticut State University is the state of Connecticut’s public liberal arts university, serving 5,200 students annually at its Willimantic campus and satellite locations. In addition to attracting students from 160 of Connecticut’s 169 towns, Eastern also draws students from 33 other states and 80 other countries. A residential campus offering 41 majors and 59 minors, Eastern offers students a strong liberal art foundation grounded in an array of applied learning opportunities. Ranked among the top 30 public universities in the North Region by U.S. News and World Report in its 2019 Best College ratings, Eastern has also been awarded ‘Green Campus’ status by the Princeton Review nine years in a row. For more information, visit www.easternct.edu.

About STARS

The Sustainability Tracking, Assessment & Rating System (STARS) is a transparent, self-reporting framework for colleges and universities to measure their sustainability performance. STARS was developed by AASHE with broad participation from the higher education community. The credits included in STARS span the breadth of higher education sustainability and are organized into four categories: Academics, Engagement, Operations, and Planning & Administration. All reports are publicly accessible on the STARS website. For more information, visit stars.aashe.org.

About AASHE

AASHE empowers higher education faculty, staff and students to be effective change agents and drivers of sustainability innovation. AASHE enables members to translate information into action by offering essential resources and professional development to a diverse, engaged community of sustainability leaders. We work with and for higher education to ensure that our world’s future leaders are motivated and equipped to solve sustainability challenges. For more information, visit www.aashe.org.

View Online: http://easternct.meritpages.com/news/eastern-s-sustainability-initiatives-recognized-by-national-organization/10535

Eastern Alumna Salutes Inclusive Excellence Award Winners

On May 9, Eastern recognized more than 100 students with a 3.5 cumulative grade point average or higher, and an additional 11 students who have demonstrated exemplary co-curricular engagement at the University’s Seventh Annual Inclusive Excellence Student Awards Ceremony. The ceremony recognized the achievements of African, Latino, Asian and Native American (ALANA) students at Eastern.

Eastern President Elsa Núñez said the ceremony was not just about inclusion, but also spoke to the University’s other core values of academic excellence, integrity, social responsibility, engagement and empowerment. “It is important for each of you to stand tall and be proud of who you are and what you are capable of. Never, ever, ever let anyone attempt to diminish your worth or your talents.

“Today’s honorees join thousands of other successful Eastern alumni who are making their own personal contributions out in the real world, including our guest speaker today, Dr. Kawami Evans. Today, we show respect and celebrate the accomplishments of students who too often have been forgotten in the past.  Thank you for being part of this celebration; to our honorees, congratulations.  We are very proud of you.”

Keynote speaker Evans ’97 serves as associate director at the Center for African Diaspora Student Success at the University of California at Davis. She earned her bachelor’s degree in history and social science at Eastern, her Master of Education in educational policy and research administration from the University of Massachusetts-Amherst and a doctorate in educational management and leadership from Drexel University.

Evans encouraged the students to use their curiosity and optimism to persevere through unseen psychological struggles that can become their staunchest challenges. She said many high- achieving students fall prey to chasing individual achievements, accolades or material gain as their goal, even confusing their self-worth with what they can accomplish.

“This is dangerous; it can lead to anxiety and depression. Don’t let this be your reality or focus,” said Evans. “Who you are is what we are celebrating today. All the earned accolades you are receiving are but a byproduct of the brilliance within you . . . You are the promise of our ancestors’ prayers and walk with the wisdom and swag of those who have grit, resilience, the social and emotional intelligence, curiosity and hope.”

Evans told the students the most important element they need to resurrect in discussing their future success is their spirituality, ways in which students discover their destiny — answers to the big questions of who they are, what is their life purpose and how do they make difference in the world.

“Much of the world right now is relegated to systems and polices. We have to raise the bar with our vision of what’s possible,” Evans said. “It will take hard work, community, love, bravery, unrelentless effort and celebration.  I sincerely believe that we can create a world that works for all.”

A total of 280 students qualified for an Academic Excellence Award with a 3.5 cumulative GPA or higher, and more than 100 of them were able to attend the May 9 event. During the ceremony, several students received service awards. Adrianna Arocho and Mayra Santos Acosta was presented the Volunteer Service Award; Aiyana Ward, the Athletic Excellence Award; Kimberly Allen and Sommer Bachelor, the Career Development Award; Jenilee Antonetty, the Resident Assistant Diversity Impact Award; Rafael Aragon, the Residential Community Leadership Award; Tristan Perez, the Social Justice Advocacy Award; Emma Costa, the Inspirational Leadership Award; Ishah Azeez, the Resilient Warrior Award; Kimberly Allen and Vishal Jungiwalla, the Advisor’s Choice Award; and the Freedom at Eastern Club, the Building Bridges Award.

By Dwight Bachman

Eastern Contributes 200 Boxes to ‘One Million Acts of Good’

Eastern students and staff stand before 200 boxes full of donated food items.

Eastern Connecticut State University students assembled 200 boxes of nonperishable food items on March 26 as participants of “One Million Acts of Good,” a program sponsored by Ellen DeGeneres and Cheerios. The boxes of granola bars, cereal and other nutritious snacks were donated to community organizations across Willimantic the following day.

Some 50 students stopped by the Student Center Lobby between 11 a.m. and 12:30 p.m. to help in the effort, which benefited the local Covenant Soup Kitchen, Access Agency, Salvation Army and seven afterschool programs, as well as Eastern’s on-campus food pantry Shawn’s Cupboard.

Accounting major Alex Rooney took time between classes to fold MATTER boxes.

Eastern’s food service provider, Chartwells, partnered with General Mills, which donated the food items. Eastern was one of 100 Chartwells higher-education clients nationwide that participated in One Million Acts of Good. The lunchbox-sized boxes that students assembled were provided by MATTER, a global nonprofit dedicated to increasing healthy food access to children.

Written by Michael Rouleau

Annual CREATE Conference to Showcase Student Art, Research

Eastern Connecticut State University will host its premier academic and artistic conference of the year on April 12. CREATE – Celebrating Research Excellence and Artistic Talent at Eastern – will take place from 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. in the Student Center and surrounding venues. An award ceremony with remarks by Eastern President Elsa Núñez will take place at 12:30 p.m. in the Betty R. Tipton Room of the Student Center.

Students present research during the poster session of the 2018 CREATE conference.

Hundreds of student researchers, artists and performers will present their talents at CREATE. Students from all majors will lead oral and poster presentations, participate in panel discussions, showcase music and dance performances, exhibit their art and photography, and present documentary films and more.

Registration will take place at 8 a.m. at the Student Center Café. President Núñez will present two undergraduate awards and two mentor awards to outstanding students and faculty members at the 12:30 p.m. award ceremony.

For more information, visit http://www.easternct.edu/create/, where you can view the day’s agenda and download the event’s cell phone app for iPhone and Android.

Written by Michael Rouleau

Shawn’s Cupboard Combats Food Insecurity

Shawn Dousis ’19, the food pantry’s namesake, helped to grow Shawn’s Cupboard after developing a passion for addressing food insecurity.

Research has shown that college students are disproportionately impacted by food insecurity in America, with up to half of them lacking consistent access to food. At Eastern Connecticut State University, a team of collaborators is taking strides toward solving this problem with the launch of Shawn’s Cupboard, a free, on-campus food pantry that welcomes all students.

Over the past two semesters, Geography Professor Patrick Vitale has investigated the prevalence of food insecurity at Eastern through his “Geography of Food” course. His students have developed surveys, conducted interviews and utilized existing research to better understand the issue. Their studies found that 14 percent out of 695 Eastern students have what the United States Department of Agriculture defines as “very low” food security. Of students with very low food security, 32 percent went an entire day without eating in the past year.

Vitale’s students also discovered a direct connection between food insecurity and student performance in and outside the classroom. Food insecurity correlates with negative impacts on grades, graduation rates and participation in campus life.

“Patrick’s class was key in finding the statistics we needed to prove our students suffered with food insecurity and grabbed the university’s attention,” said Shawn Dousis ’19, the pantry’s namesake and president of the Campus Ministry, the organization that jumpstarted the project. Dousis handles social media, organizes volunteers and seeks community donations for the cupboard.

“When I was told two years ago that Eastern had a pantry, I took it upon myself to try and build it up,” Dousis explained, who majors in elementary education and liberal studies. Surprised to learn that such a place existed on campus, she was eager to move the project beyond its developing stages. “Little did I know so many people would become part of the team!”

Other driving forces behind the pantry include Father Larry Lapointe and Nancy Brennan of the Campus Ministry, in addition to Kim Silcox, director of the Center for Community Engagement.

“Working with the cupboard has enriched my class and is one of the most rewarding parts of my work at Eastern,” said Vitale. While his students get a small amount of extra credit for their volunteer hours, most do it solely because they care about getting involved, and leave with new insights. “In the process of working there they learn a lot about food insecurity at the university and how the cupboard operates,” said Vitale. “This often informs their final projects in the class. For example, several of the volunteers are developing surveys of students who use the cupboard and others are developing promotional materials of various sorts.”

“I’ve managed to schedule more than 20 student volunteers throughout the week, most sitting in for one to two hours at a time,” said Dousis. “They are expected to log their own hours, stock donations, sign off on people who come in for food and organize the fridge and shelves. We are constantly encouraging them to promote the cupboard and making sure they see how important their volunteer time is.”

Dousis is passionate about combatting food insecurity for numerous reasons, such as witnessing friends and family who have suffered from it. The most significant motivator, however, is knowing the severity of the issue and how little has been done about it across the nation. “It’s both frustrating and inspiring to attend workshops and conferences and hear about other food pantries. I want to take all I’ve learned, with what I continue to learn, and implement it here at Eastern. Raising awareness and helping Eastern students every day is extremely rewarding.”

Vitale hopes that Shawn’s Cupboard will transform into a space that will allow students to organize and support one another. “It should be a place where students not only can get food, but also recognize and work to overcome common struggles,” he said. “Right now our shared vision is driven by immediate concerns of making sure students are informed and that we have enough food.”

Donations are encouraged, particularly food that requires minimal preparation, such as granola bars, microwave popcorn, macaroni and cheese, canned soup and peanut butter.

Dousis sees the cupboard eventually being able to house more perishable items, and similarly wants it to be somewhere that people are comfortable using it freely. She noted that partnering with outside organizations and actively promoting programs of this nature will assist in its success. The Swipe It Forward program at Eastern, for instance, grants five free dining hall meals to students per semester. Michelle Delaney, dean of students, can be contacted at delaneymi@easternct.edu for more information.

Shawn’s Cupboard is open at its main location, the Knight House, at the following hours: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Monday; 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. on Tuesday; 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Wednesday; 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Thursday; and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Friday.

Food donations can me made during the operating hours of Shawn’s Cupboard, or during the hours of these locations: Newman Hall, 290 Prospect Street in Willimantic from 4-6 p.m. on Thursday; the Center for Community Engagement from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. on Monday to Friday; Webb Hall Room 325 from 2:45 to 3:45 p.m. on Tuesday and 1:45 to 3:45 p.m. on Thursday.

Monetary donations are appreciated as well and can be made out to the Foundation for Campus Ministry with a notation that the funds are for Shawn’s Cupboard. The Cupboard is staffed entirely by volunteers and is available to any member of the Eastern community.

Written by Jordan Corey

Eastern to Participate in Ellen DeGeneres’ ‘One Million Acts of Good’

Eastern Connecticut State University students will assemble 200 boxes of nonperishable food items on March 26 as participants of “One Million Acts of Good,” a program sponsored by Ellen DeGeneres and Cheerios. From 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. in the Student Center Lobby, students will pack boxes of cereal, granola bars and other nutritious snacks that will be delivered to a Willimantic afterschool program the following day.

Chartwells, Eastern’s food service provider, is partnering with General Mills, which is donating the food items. Eastern is one of 100 Chartwells higher-education clients nationwide participating in One Million Acts of Good. The lunchbox-sized boxes that students will assemble are provided by MATTER, a global nonprofit dedicated to increasing healthy food access to children.

Eastern’s mascot, Willi the Warrior, will cheer on students as they assemble the boxes – 25 of which will go to Eastern’s on-campus food pantry, Shawn’s Cupboard; the rest going to a local afterschool program affiliated with Eastern’s Center for Community Engagement.

Written by Michael Rouleau

Eastern Opens Arms to Willimantic with Annual Day of Giving

Hurley Hall was the venue for the Day of Giving

Written by Jordan Corey

WILLIMANTIC, CT (11/21/2018) More than 500 local Willimantic residents enjoyed an early Thanksgiving meal at the 12th annual Day of Giving at Eastern Connecticut State University on Nov. 21.

The Day of Giving is a collaboration between Eastern’s Center for Community Engagement (CCE), the Office of Institutional Advancement and Chartwells, Eastern’s food service provider. Turkey and traditional fixings were donated by the ECSU Foundation and Chartwells.

“The majority of the food is donated,” said Joe Salvaggio, senior director of Dining Services. “We start reaching out to our vendors in September and ask what they can do for donations. We have a couple repeat donors that provide to us every year. It’s an ‘all hands on deck’ event.”

CCE special events coordinator Sarah Tricarico, who was in charge of organizing student volunteers, commented that the lead-up to the Day of Giving is one of her favorite aspects of the event. She spoke on the importance of weekly food drives and the value of seeing donations go to those in need.

Amberlee Cubanski, the CCE student leader in charge of the event, said: “There are a lot of people who don’t have a hot meal on Thanksgiving. When they come here, there’s no discrimination, no judging. They can just come and have a nice meal. It’s really awesome to see everybody sit together, even if they don’t know who’s at the other end of the table.”

Staff from Chartwells prepared food and decorated the Hurley Hall dining room. More than 50 volunteers from Eastern, as well as a group from Putnam Public

More than 500 members of the Willimantic community showed up for the event.

School, served food, provided free transportation, welcomed guests, ran children’s activities and cleaned up.

Marisol, a member of the Willimantic community, praised the overall quality of the event. “I come every year,” she said. “It’s beautiful. It’s clean. The people are very polite. The relationship between Eastern and Willimantic is a good relationship.”

Interim Provost William Salka served stuffing at the food line – his first time with the Day of Giving. “People are very thankful, and we’re very happy to see them,” he said. “Eastern benefits so greatly from being in this community, it’s the least that we can do to give back.”

Sabrina Linares, Willimantic resident and Eastern student, highlighted the wholesome atmosphere of the occasion. “I bring my family with me. We get time to bond here.”

Tricarico concluded: “We continue to hold the Day of Giving because there’s need for it. To be able to offer people a good Thanksgiving meal… It’s great that we can provide that.”

Eastern Holds Third Civic Action Conference

Eastern President Elsa Nunez

Written by Dwight Bachman

Eastern students have a reputation of service to community that goes back decades. But at the Third Annual Civic Action Conference on Nov. 14, it was demonstrated how much students actually learn as a result of their service.

Eastern President Elsa Nunez introduced the idea of structured service learning in 2009, when she established the Center for Community Engagement (CCE), directed by Kim Silcox.

Nunez celebrated Eastern’s faculty for its commitment to organized, systematic service learning. “Students need to ask why people are suffering, and truly reflect on what they can do,” she said. “Getting faculty involved by connecting class curriculum to community needs will increase civic action in a meaningful way. It is so gratifying to see our students embrace this, as it reflects Eastern’s core values”

A wide range of speakers focused on four themes at the conference: 1.) writing assignments to promote civic action; 2.) employability and community engagement; 3.) higher education as a public good; and 4.) community engagement research.

“The conference highlights the amazing work Eastern faculty have achieved in engaging students in the community,” said Silcox, who organized the conference along with Nicolas Simon, assistant professor of sociology. “Students participating in service learning projects are engaging in research, thinking critically and expressing themselves as they reflect on the experiences. These are key marketable skills in today’s job market.”

Part-time lecturer Lucy Hurston and Nicholas Simon, assistant professor of sociology.

Part-time lecturer Lucy Hurston focuses on learning outcomes rather than just the student-volunteer experience. She had students conduct research on numerous issues, including homelessness and poverty. Students volunteered on a Habitat for Humanity housing project. The activity helped students change their perceptions of lower-income populations.

Sociology Professor Cara Bergstrom-Lynch

Sociology Professor Cara Bergstrom-Lynch’s intensive writing course requires students to focus on social inequalities and to identify solutions. “Students then develop a research project through a sociological lens and write a research paper,” said Bergstrom-Lynch.

English Professor Miriam Chirico

English Professor Miriam Chirico’s students focused on urban revitalization. “The goal,” she said, “is to have students come together to create a social network that helps enhance writing about tourism and increase pride in community.” Through the experience, students reinforced their civic commitment and simultaneously developed writing and rhetorical skills.

Education Professor David Stoloff

Addressing the theme of employability and civic engagement, Art and Art History Professor Terry Lennox’s students creatively design with the intent “to advance the communication and marketing outcomes of non-profit organizations. It is a collaborative, guided effort designed to learn the value of art and also show what we all can do, working together,” she said. Through these projects, students build portfolios, which contributes to their employability upon graduating.

Fatma Pakdil, associate professor of business administration, examined employability from a market perspective. She presented statistics showing that “only 11 percent of business leaders agree that today’s college graduates have the skills and competencies their businesses need, while 96 percent of chief academic officers say their institutions are very or somewhat effective at preparing students for the world of work.” Pakdil proposed affording students courses that enable students “to study on projects analyzing real problems, issues and bottlenecks faced by business organizations,” which she believes will better prepare students for the work place.

Associate Professor of Business Information Systems (BIS) Alex Citurs and student Rebekah Brancato, a BIS major, with a minor in Healthcare Informatics, showed how community-based projects help students gain practical experience and make meaningful contributions to communities. Students also gain insight into new ways of doing things and building relationships for future collaborations. The work in information systems that he and his students do, which many organizations cannot afford from professional consultants, improves the operations of non-profit organizations.

Education Professor David Stoloff examined pre-service education as a positive dimension of civic engagement. His students participate in projects in local school and community centers. They write reflections on these experiences at mid-term and at the end of the semester. Stoloff said the goal is to teach students “knowledge, skills, responsibility and commitment within social justice views of civic engagement.”

John Murphy, lecturer in the Department of Communication

John Murphy, lecturer in the Department of Communication, uses local radio, television, web sites, social and print media to demonstrate the value of service learning. Students use various media — digital platforms included — to share stories about the important assets of organizations and people served. This creates opportunities for students to build portfolios and provides information to the community on valuable, underutilized resources available in the community.

Geography Professor Patrick Vitale’s “Geography of Food” class made community-engagement research a campus project. Their results suggest that many students on campus experience food insecurity. The students examined the impact of food insecurity, the resources that are available to support students, and what other universities are doing to address this crisis. “Their research shows the political and educational potential of a class that engages students to take on a pressing concern in their community,” said Vitale.

Yolanda Bergstrom-Lynch, a campus librarian, said “It is vital that librarians have a seat at the table as service learning partners.” She introduced a “Service Learning and Community Engagement” library research guide that was created in collaboration with the Center for Community Engagement. The publication serves as a resource guide of the various ways in which librarians promote community engagement. “Librarians serve as bridges, connecting the library to other campus organizations and the campus community to service learning resources in the library.”

Eastern to Host 12th Day of Giving, Local Food Drives

Written by Shelby Eccleston

WILLIMANTIC, CT (11/02/2018) The 12th annual Day of Giving at Eastern Connecticut State University will occur on Nov. 21 from noon-2 p.m. in Hurley Hall. The event is open to Willimantic residents who may not have Thanksgiving plans otherwise. Preceding the Day of Giving, several food drives will occur at Windham grocery stores.

Day of Giving is a collaboration between the Center for Community Engagement (CCE), the Office of Institutional Advancement and Chartwells, Eastern’s food service provider.

Turkey, stuffing and other traditional fixings will be donated by the ECSU Foundation and Chartwells. Staff from Chartwells will prepare food and decorate. More than 50 volunteers from Eastern – students, faculty, staff, alumni and friends of the university – will serve food, provide transportation, welcome guests, run children’s activities and clean up.

Transportation will be provided free of charge from Ashton Towers at noon and from the Covenant Soup Kitchen at 12:15 p.m. Parking is available on campus, with handicapped spaces in the Student Center lot.

During the weekends preceding the event, the CCE will run food drives in the parking lots of local grocery stores. All donations go to the Covenant Soup Kitchen and other local food pantries.

Upcoming drives are on Nov. 3 and 4 at Bob’s Windham IGA; Nov. 10 and 11 at the Willimantic Food Co-op; and Nov. 17 and 18 at Stop and Shop on Main Street. Each drive goes from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Donation boxes will also be placed around campus beginning Nov. 1.

Last year’s Day of Giving hosted approximately 500 community members. “You can’t ask for a better humanitarian day for people that are less fortunate,” said one longtime Willimantic resident.