Bolivian Ambassador Speaks at Eastern: ‘The Human Race is a Family’

Written by Jordan Corey

Sacha Llorenti, Bolivian Ambassador to the United Nations

Sacha Llorenti, Bolivian Ambassador to the United Nations

Sacha Llorenti, Bolivian Ambassador to the United Nations, visited Eastern Connecticut State University on Sept. 13 as part of its University Hour event series. Llorenti provided insight on the past and current state of Bolivia, and then spoke more broadly on global relations.

The ambassador was introduced by friend Martin Mendoza-Botelho, a professor of political science at Eastern, who noted that Llorenti has always had a “natural appetite to serve society.”

Llorenti began by describing the world from Bolivia’s perspective. He informed listeners that, while Bolivia is a highly indigenous country, it took almost 200 years to elect its first indigenous president, who took office in 2006.

In addition to social backlash against indigenous cultures in Bolivia, the country was once very poor, with 40 percent of its population living in extreme poverty. With the election of President Evo Morales, Llorenti said, came a “democratic revolution” that has since turned Bolivia into South America’s fastest-growing economy, reducing the poverty level to its current 16 percent.

“That’s why leadership is so important,” Llorenti stressed, using Morales as a jumping-off point to address crises that are going unsolved globally. “We are facing the worst humanitarian crises since 1945,” he said, naming war, poverty, finance, energy usage and climate change among the glaring issues. “Things are getting worse and worse.”

The ambassador called the human race a “family” that must work together to fix the world’s problems. Because the modern world is so interlinked, he argued, what happens in one place has an impact everywhere else.

Consequently, Llorenti advocated for a rules-based international power system in which all members share common goals and responsibilities – components he claimed the global society is lacking. He also pointed out that, in light of this, what is done on a local level matters. “It’s really up to us to do our share,” the ambassador concluded.

Eastern Breaks Into List of Top 25 Public Regional Universities

Written by Ed Osborn

eastern_front_entranceFor the first time, Eastern Connecticut State University made the list of the top 25 regional public universities in the North in this year’s U.S. News and World Report’s 2018 edition of “Best Colleges.” Eastern was the highest ranked university among the four Connecticut state universities. The annual rankings were released on Sept. 12.

•Theatre students perform Cervantes' "Pedro, The Great Pretender," as the first production in the Proscenium Theatre of Eastern's new Fine Arts Instructional Center

• Theatre students perform Cervantes’ “Pedro, The Great Pretender,” as the first production in the Proscenium Theatre of Eastern’s new Fine Arts Instructional Center

Regional universities such as Eastern are ranked on the basis of 16 criteria that include peer assessment, graduation and retention rates, faculty resources, admissions selectivity, financial resources and alumni giving. The North Region includes colleges and universities from New England, New York, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Delaware and Maryland.

•Biology major Elizabeth DelBuono '17 is in the graduate program in Genetic Counseling at Sarah Lawrence College.

• Biology major Elizabeth DelBuono ’17 is in the graduate program in Genetic Counseling at Sarah Lawrence College.

“I am gratified to see Eastern ranked in the top 25 public institutions in the North in this year’s U.S. News and World Report’s 2018 Best Colleges report,” said Eastern President Elsa Nunez. “Our commitment to high standards, our focus on providing students with personal attention, and the introduction of new academic programs have resulted in our favorable ranking. Students and their families turn to the Best Colleges rankings to help decide where to attend college.  These newest rankings reaffirm that Eastern is providing a relevant and high quality education on our beautiful residential campus.”

This year’s U.S. News and World Report rankings included reviews of 1,389 schools nationwide and are available at www.usnews.com/colleges. They will also be published in the Best Colleges 2017 Guidebook, published by U.S. News & World Report and available on newsstands on Oct. 10.

For the past 33 years, the U.S. News and World Report rankings, which group colleges based on categories created by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching, have grown to be the most comprehensive research tool for students and parents considering higher education opportunities.

Eastern Announces Fall ‘University Hour’ Schedule

Written by Jordan Corey

campus quad nice wide shotWILLIMANTIC, CT (09/12/2017) This fall 2017 semester, Eastern Connecticut State University is again hosting University Hour, a free and open-to-the-public series of cultural events that occurs every Wednesday from 3 to 4 p.m. in locations across campus. Upcoming events include:

On Sept. 13 in the Fine Arts Instructional Center Concert Hall, Bolivian Ambassador to the United Nations Sacha Llorenti will discuss global security. He will be speaking about the ideological gaps that lie between developing and developed countries, among other foreign policy issues.

On Sept. 20 in the Student Center Theatre, “Hostage of Empire: Constitutional Dimensions of Puerto Rican Birthright Citizenship” will showcase the history of America’s extension of citizenship to Puerto Rico, and resulting debates over constitutional status of Puerto Ricans.

On Sept. 27 in the Student Center Theatre, “The Role of Naturopathic Medicine in the Health Care System” will feature a lecture by Dr. Tonya Pasternak, who will talk about naturopathic medicine and discuss her medical approaches to common conditions.

On Oct. 4 in the Student Center Theatre, “Dear Woke Brown Girl” will feature “Latina Rebels” founder Prisca Dorcas Mojica Rodriguez, who will speak about the concept and process of being “woke,” along with the personal tolls that often come with it.

On Oct. 11 in the Student Center Theatre, Cambodian scholar and poet Heng Sreang will discuss his research on the Cambodian (Khmer) diaspora in New England and California, in addition to doing a poetry reading.

On Oct. 18 in the Fine Arts Instructional Center Concert Hall, Eastern will host the Providence-based music group Ensemble/Parallax. The ensemble will give a performance featuring several of their pieces, with a follow-up discussion on performance techniques, the aesthetics of new music and historical content on the music presented.

On Oct. 25 in the Student Center Theatre, “Alcohol Monologues” will take place, a show mimicking the style of the “Vagina Monologues.” A cast of student volunteers will read candid accounts of their experiences in order for the audience to consider the impacts of alcohol usage.

On Nov. 1 in the Student Center Theatre, Matika Wilbur, an acclaimed photographer from the Tulalip and Swinomish tribes, will give a presentation that encourages citizens of the United States to move past appropriating and neglecting indigenous images and traditions. This will be done through photographic representation and direct narratives of Native American lives.

On Nov. 15 in the Student Center Theatre, “Living Intersex: Walking the Line” – the final event of the semester – will feature Saifa Wall, an intersex man of African descent. Having overcome emotional and political hardships, Wall aims to develop strong relationships between ethical, responsible research and community empowerment.

Bolivian Ambassador to Speak on Global Security at Eastern

Bolivian Ambassador_LlorentiWritten by Jordan Corey

WILLIMANTIC, CT (09/07/2017) On Sept. 13, Bolivian Ambassador to the United Nations Sacha Llorenti will be making an appearance at Eastern Connecticut State University’s “University Hour” to discuss global security. The event takes place from 3 to 4 p.m. in the Fine Arts Instructional Center.

During his presentation, Llorenti will address the ideological gaps between developing and developed countries. This year, Bolivia joined the Security Council of the United Nations as a non-permanent member. The ambassador’s “University Hour” speech will center on foreign policy and is free to attend.

‘Colleges of Distinction’ Recognizes Eastern’s Business and Education Programs

colleges of distinction badges

Written by Michael Rouleau

WILLIMANTIC, CT (08/09/2017) The School of Education and Professional Studies at Eastern Connecticut State University has been recognized by Colleges of Distinction for its expert blending of the liberal arts with professional programing in business and education. This honor is in addition to Eastern being named a 2017-18 College of Distinction by the same organization, which is a trusted guide for college-bound students.

In acknowledging the recognition, Jacob Easley, dean of Eastern’s School of Education and Professional Studies, said: “The marriage of liberal arts outcomes with those of professional studies contributes to the unique value and distinction of our programs. Furthermore, our commitment to inquiry, social responsibility, lifelong learning and diversity enriches the lives of students.”

“The 21st-century job market now demands employees who are both stellar communicators and critical-thinkers, and it is with the School of Education and Professional Studies’ well-rounded approach to career development that its students are especially prepared to take on the postgraduate world,” wrote Colleges of Distinction in a recent news release.

“We are ecstatic to celebrate Eastern Connecticut State University for its exceptional commitment to student success,” said Tyson Schritter, chief operating officer for Colleges of Distinction. “Building upon its extensive liberal arts curriculum, as well as its impressive engagement of high-impact practices, Eastern continues to stand out through its stance as a leader in professional education.”

Colleges of Distinction granted these awards in education and business programming after a comprehensive vetting process, selecting schools based on such qualities as accreditation, breadth of program and a track record of success.

Eastern’s Education programs include early childhood education, elementary education, secondary education and educational technology. “Eastern’s future educators are bolstered by an enriching liberal arts perspective, allowing them to be empathetic, creative and efficient mentors for their students,” added Colleges of Distinction.

“The fast-paced, modern world of business requires effective communication and innovative strategies,” wrote the organization. “Eastern’s programs in accounting, business administration, business information systems, finance and organizational management keep their future leaders ahead of the curve and ready to grow alongside the industry.”

About Colleges of Distinction: Colleges of Distinction has recognized and honored schools throughout the U.S. for excellence in undergraduate-focused higher education for over 15 years. The member schools within the Colleges of Distinction consortium distinguish themselves through their focus on the undergraduate experience. For more information, visit CollegesofDistinction.com.

About Eastern Connecticut State University: Eastern Connecticut State University is the state of Connecticut’s public liberal arts university, serving more than 5,300 students annually at its Willimantic campus and satellite locations. In addition to attracting students from 163 of Connecticut’s 169 towns, Eastern also draws students from 23 other states and 20 other countries. A residential campus offering 39 majors and 64 minors, Eastern offers students a strong liberal art foundation grounded in an array of applied learning opportunities. Ranked the 26th top public university in the North Region by U.S. News and World Report in its 2017 Best College ratings, Eastern has also been awarded “Green Campus” status by the U.S. Green Building Council seven years in a row. For more information, visit www.easternct.edu.

Eastern Receives Generous Davis Foundation Grant

Critical Reading and Writing across the Disciplines

Written by Michael Rouleau

•A peer mentor tutors a student in the Writing Center in Eastern's J. Eugene Smith Library:

• A peer mentor tutors a fellow student in the Writing Center in Eastern’s J. Eugene Smith Library

WILLIMANTIC, CT (07/18/2017) The Davis Educational Foundation has awarded Eastern Connecticut State University a $200,000 grant to develop its “Critical Reading and Writing across the Disciplines” initiative. The two-year project aims to strengthen first- and second-year students’ analytical thinking, reading and writing skills by enhancing faculty approaches to teaching critical thinking. The project also aims to improve teaching and learning assessment, as well as better link Eastern’s discussion-oriented First Year Program with its level-two Writing Program – two programs that all Eastern students pass through regardless of major.

“In the past it was assumed that students develop higher-order thinking skills as a cumulative result to degree completion,” explained David Pellegrini, project director and theatre professor. “But today, educational researchers have found that intentional instruction focused on critical reading and writing best ensures that students graduate with the skills they need in competitive and ever-evolving career landscapes. Moreover, this emphasis on critical thinking must begin at the very beginning of a student’s college experience.”

While the grant will be distributed over a two-year period, university officials plan to make the “Critical Reading and Writing across the Disciplines” program a sustained component of Eastern’s liberal arts curriculum.

•Psychology Professor Peter Bachiochi is one of the key faculty members involved in the Critical Reading and Writing across the Disciplines program. He will participate in the Critical Thinking Task Force and review curriculum

• Psychology Professor Peter Bachiochi is one of the key faculty members involved in the Critical Reading and Writing across the Disciplines program. He will participate in the Critical Thinking Task Force and review curriculum

Beginning in fall 2017, a faculty-led Critical Thinking Task Force will convene with expert consultants in the field of college-level critical thinking pedagogy and assessment. Faculty workshops will be developed and best practices will be shared among colleagues and with students in a process that will transform how critical thinking is taught in each academic discipline at Eastern.

“Critical Reading and Writing across the Disciplines” is connected to two longstanding Eastern programs: the First Year Liberal Arts Introduction (FYI 100) and the Writing Program. To assist them in becoming engaged in the intellectual life of the university, first-year students enroll in one of many discussion-oriented FYI courses that explore a broad, contemporary theme developed from the expertise of the instructor. From there, students take their major’s designated Writing Intensive (WI) course.

“By convening and providing training for instructors of FYI 100 and level-two WI courses, this project will forge meaningful connections between modes of instruction, evaluation and assessment to enhance the development of critical thinking competencies for students from freshman to sophomore year,” added Pellegrini.

“One advantage of a small liberal arts college is that faculty are able to come together to jointly plan programs,” said Provost Dimitrios Pachis, speaking to the collaborative nature of the project. “In line with the interdisciplinary nature of our liberal arts curriculum, this project draws on the interests and expertise of faculty from nearly all of our major programs.”

“We are honored to receive this significant grant from the Davis Educational Foundation, which is recognized for its support of innovative programs at New England colleges and universities,” said Eastern President Elsa Núñez. “We are very grateful to the foundation’s trustees for this grant, which will strengthen the core academic skills of all Eastern students. As a liberal arts institution, we keenly understand the importance of developing strong reading and writing skills in our students, regardless of their major. This grant will allow us to significantly improve our first-year program, increasing student learning from freshman to sophomore year while improving student learning outcomes and retention and graduation rates.”

The Davis Educational Foundation was established by Stanton and Elisabeth Davis after Mr. Davis’s retirement as chairman of Shaw’s Supermarkets, Inc.

Eastern Named a ‘Great College to Work For’ for Eighth Time

Written by Michael Rouleau

2013GCWF_4CsingularWILLIMANTIC, CT (07/17/2017) Eastern Connecticut State University has again been named a “Great College to Work For” by The Chronicle of Higher Education, a top trade publication for colleges and universities. Released today by The Chronicle, the results are based on a survey of 232 colleges and universities. This is the eighth time Eastern has received “Great Colleges” distinction since it first began participating in the program in 2009.

Only 79 of the institutions that applied for the program achieved “Great College to Work For” recognition this year. Eastern was also named to the national Great Colleges “Honor Roll,” one of only 42 institutions named to this exclusive club. This is the third year in a row that Eastern has been named to the honor roll. Eastern was also the only public four-year university or college in New England to gain “Great Colleges” distinction.

The Chronicle’s Great Colleges to Work For survey is the largest and most comprehensive workplace study in higher education. Now in its 10th year, it recognizes the colleges that get top ratings from their employees on workforce practices and policies.

The survey results are based on a two-part assessment process: an institutional audit that captured demographics and workplace policies, and a survey administered to faculty, administrators, and professional support staff. The primary factor in deciding whether an institution received recognition was employee feedback.

Eastern won honors in six survey categories this year: Collaborative Governance; Compensation and Benefits; Facilities, Workspaces, and Security; Confidence in Senior Leadership; Teaching Environment; and Tenure Clarity and Process.

“It is gratifying to know that our employees continue to value the positive working atmosphere we share on our campus,” said Eastern President Elsa Núñez. “The ‘Great Colleges to Work For’ recognition is not only a symbol of the common purpose found among our faculty and staff, it represents the welcoming and supportive environment that our students experience every day.

“To know that Eastern has consistently received this honor – winning ‘Great Colleges’ recognition in each of the eight years we have participated – is an indication that our commitment to campus unity is an enduring value firmly embedded in our culture.”

“Ten years in, the ‘Great Colleges to Work For’ distinction is well-known by academic jobseekers as a sign that an institution’s employees are valued and given opportunities for growth even when they face financial constraints,” said Liz McMillen, editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education. “Any college or university that’s on the list is showing that they emphasize one of their most valuable assets: their faculty and staff.”

To administer the survey and analyze the results, The Chronicle worked with ModernThink LLC, a strategic human capital consulting firm that has conducted numerous “Best Places to Work” programs, surveying hundreds of thousands of employees nationwide. “It’s easier to be a great workplace during good times, but it’s when times are tough that the commitment to workplace quality really gets tested,” said Richard K. Boyer, principal and managing partner of ModernThink LLC. “Those institutions that measure up during times of economic hardship reinforce their already strong cultures and put even more distance between them and their peer institutions for whom they compete for talent.”

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About Eastern Connecticut State University

Eastern Connecticut State University is the state of Connecticut’s public liberal arts university, serving more than 5,300 students annually at its Willimantic campus and satellite locations. In addition to attracting students from 163 of Connecticut’s 169 towns, Eastern also draws students from 23 other states and 20 other countries. A residential campus offering 39 majors and 64 minors, Eastern offers students a strong liberal art foundation grounded in an array of applied learning opportunities. Ranked the 26th top public university in the North Region by U.S. News and World Report in its 2017 Best College ratings, Eastern has also been awarded “Green Campus” status by the U.S. Green Building Council seven years in a row. For more information, visit www.easternct.edu.

About The Chronicle of Higher Education

The Chronicle of Higher Education is dedicated to serving the higher-education community with insights, understanding, and intellectual engagement. Academic leaders and professionals from around the world trust The Chronicle’s analysis and in-depth exploration to make informed decisions.

About ModernThink LLC

As a research and consulting leader in workplace issues, ModernThink has supported a wide variety of “Best Place to Work” initiatives. Through these programs, the firm has gained substantial survey and industry expertise, including specific insight into higher education. ModernThink knows what it takes to build a great place to work and shares that know-how with its clients. The ModernThink team of organizational development experts is dedicated to helping colleges follow through and capitalize on feedback from employees and benchmark data from peers to drive meaningful change at their institutions. Learn more at http://www.modernthink.com.

View Online: http://easternct.meritpages.com/news/eastern-named-a–great-college-to-work-for–for-eighth-time/691

Eastern a 2017 College of Distinction

COD_Program Badge Business 2017-2018 COD_Program Badge Education 2017-2018

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Written by Michael Rouleau

Eastern Connecticut State University was recognized as a 2017-18 College of Distinction by the college-guide/ranking organization Colleges of Distinction. New this year, Colleges of Distinction is further recognizing colleges that have distinctive fields of study—first-rate programs with professional accreditations. This year Eastern received badges for programs of distinction in education and business.

“Eastern Connecticut State University is one of the teaching-centered colleges that makes up the fabric of the American educational system,” said Wes Creel, founder of Colleges of Distinction. “It’s a school that delivers well our four overarching distinctions—Engagement, Teaching, Community and Outcomes—the fundamental elements of an effective undergraduate education. It is the mission of Colleges of Distinction to honor and recognize those institutions that are so essential to educating the next generation of young adults.”

To be designated a “college of distinction” a school’s curriculum must emphasize such core competencies as critical thinking, writing, oral skills, research and global perspectives. They must also offer dynamic out-of-classroom learning and study abroad programs.

“The Colleges of Distinction evaluation process goes beyond traditional ranking models that assess colleges based on things like historic prestige, selectivity, athletic prowess and the size of its endowment,” said Creel. “Such ranking systems tend to focus on the perceived ‘top’ schools, despite the fact that the vast majority of students do not attend the small, exclusive selection of ‘big-name’ schools.”

Once a school is deemed qualified to be among Colleges of Distinction, an in-depth profile of the school is published on their website and in their guidebook, which is then made available to high school students nationwide.

Students Study Tropical Biology in Bahamas

 

Written by Michael Rouleau

Twenty biology students from Eastern Connecticut State University traveled to the Bahamas in May 2017 to study the island’s tropical biology.

At the Gerace Research Center, students experienced life at an active field station where they explored mangrove forests, sea grass beds, saline lakes and coral reefs. The group snorkeled at field sites around the island and identified species and compared notes on the animals and behaviors they observed. They also conducted quantitative surveys of rocky intertidal and dune communities.

The trip to the Bahamas was the field component of a class taken on the Eastern campus during the academic year, in which students studied island formation and the ecology of island ecosystems. The class was led by Biology Professors Joshua Idjadi, Kristen Epp and Brett Mattingly.

In their free time, students enjoyed interacting with other school groups and local residents at the research center and surrounding community. Students described the field course as their best experience at Eastern.

Psychology Students Study Culture in Hawaii

 

Written by Michael Rouleau

Eighteen psychology students from Eastern Connecticut State University traveled to Hawaii in May 2017 to study cross-cultural differences related to well-being and relationships. From western and native-Hawaiian perspectives, the Eastern students examined topics such as parenting and attachment styles, social support, emotional expression, romantic relationships and more.

“Prior to going on this trip our class learned a lot about the culture in Hawaii and how they view relationships,” said Elizabeth Navarro ’17. “However, after traveling there I found that learning about culture in a classroom is nothing like experiencing it firsthand. I thought I had a good idea of Hawaiian culture until we traveled there; it was a complete culture shock.”

The trip to Hawaii was the field component of a course taken on the Eastern campus during the academic year, and was led by Psychology Professors Madeline Fugere and Kristalyn Salters-Pedneault.

In addition to their studies, the students also visited Iolani Palace, the home of the Hawaiian royal family; the Byodo-In Temple, in commemoration of the anniversary of Japanese immigrants to Hawaii; Waimea Valley, where they toured botanical gardens and took a waterfall swim; and Pearl Harbor. They also participated in a community service project to rebuild the wall of an 800-year-old aquaculture site.