Professor Dan Donaghy Receives 2019 Paterson Poetry Prize

Daniel Donaghy, English professor at Eastern Connecticut State University, has been named the 2019 Paterson Poetry Prize recipient for his book of poetry “Somerset.” The annual award, sponsored by the Passaic Community College Poetry Center, honors what judges deem the strongest collection of poems published in the previous year.

Drawing from authentic experiences and the growth surrounding them, “Somerset” is the third part in a series centering on Donaghy’s upbringing in the Kensington section of Philadelphia. The collection was his most difficult to create thus far, requiring newfound intellectual and emotional energy as he navigated delicate spaces.

“I went all in to examine what life is and was like in Kensington, with all of its complexities, and make art out of it,” said Donaghy. “I was not going to try to write funny poems just to soften the edges of the book, which, I admit, I did in my earlier books. There were times during the course of writing ‘Somerset’ when I knew I was in uncharted territory, pushing further into heavy issues such as the conditions that our family and neighbors lived under.”

Through his poetry, Donaghy touches on racism, poverty and chronic violence. He praised Paterson co-winner Sean Thomas Dougherty for being another writer who has strived to address more difficult subjects.

“There were poets before him and me, too, who broke down the door in regard to writing honestly about class and place,” Donaghy said, crediting Gwendolyn Brooks, Langston Hughes and James Wright among them. “Those writers, and many others, continue to show me how to write about and explore big, tough questions related to where you live or grew up. You never run out of questions about where you come from and how it’s impacted you.”

He continued: “Some of these poems were incredibly draining to write and are still hard to read. Seeing how people respond to them reminds me that I’m not alone in the world. That sense of connection is one of the great gifts writing and reading can give us.”

In addition to focusing on broader social issues, Donaghy gets unquestionably personal with “Somerset,” particularly when confronting the death of his mother.

“Writing about her brings her back to me, though, so with the pain come waves of her love, which was endless,” he stated. “There’s a line in the book from ‘Birthday Poem for My Mother’ that says, ‘how close we can get to the dead sometimes.’ That’s as good a reason as any I can think of to write: to bring back the dead and talk with them, be with them again.”

Donaghy has noticed, however, the poems that were the hardest to write are the poems that people respond best to at readings. “I took a chance and claimed my truth, and I wrote my heart out, and I cried sometimes while I wrote, and I am glad now that those poems are in the world,” he said. “I hope my stories will inspire others to go out and tell their stories, as well as to listen with empathy and openness to the stories of others.”

Donaghy feels “tremendous freedom” at Eastern to seize creative opportunities, and thanks President Elsa Núñez, his students and colleagues including Chris Torockio, Raouf Mama and Susan DeRosa for their support along the way. On sabbatical this semester, Donaghy has several projects in the works, from poetry to short stories. “I’m just thankful that the words are coming. I hope I can revise them into things that I can be proud of, that can be valuable in people’s lives and that further Eastern’s mission as Connecticut’s public liberal arts university.”

A scholar in contemporary British and American poetry, Donaghy has been published in some of the most widely read literary publications in the country. He was Windham County’s first-ever poet laureate and is responsible for launching “Here,” a national poetry magazine.

Written by Jordan Corey

43 Strong, Eastern Represents in Georgia at National Conference

With 43 student presenters, Eastern was among the top 20 schools nationwide for NCUR participation, and the only school from New England to make the list.

Forty-three students from Eastern Connecticut State University traveled to Georgia on April 11-13 to present original research at the National Conference on Undergraduate Research (NCUR). The 2019 conference occurred at Kennesaw State University and featured hundreds of undergraduate students from across the country.

Eastern was among the top 20 schools nationwide for NCUR participation this year – the only school from New England to make the list – and one of the few with a student population of less than 6,000.

Eastern students from a range of majors presented artwork, music performances and oral/poster presentations. Research questions probed topics such as the microbiome of scorpions, the link between casual sex and online dating, pop-culture glamorization of eating disorders, and much more.

Adella Dzitko-Carlson presents “Finding Faith in the 21st Century: The Search for the Sacred in John Luther Adams’ “In the Name of the Earth.”

Music major Esther Jones ’20 commented on the experience of performing a lecture-recital. “This experience at NCUR was a milestone in my life because I didn’t think that I could actually do it when the time finally came around. I thought that I would be trembling so badly that my mind would go blank.”

Jones’ piano performance was titled “‘Theme and Variations on an Egyptian Folksong’ by Gamal Abdel-Rahim.” She added, “This experience helped to boost my confidence and has given me courage to face new challenges.”

“One of my greatest takeaways from this conference is how it pushes you and makes you a better academic,” said Michael Tuttle ’19, who majors in psychology and mathematics.

“Presenting at a conference subjects your research to a higher level of scrutiny, challenging your thoughts and ideas. When audience members ask questions and offer suggestions, it pushes you to think critically and creatively.” Tuttle’s presentation was titled “Overconfidence and Impulsivity of College Students in a Cognitive Reflection Task.”

Theresa Parker presents “Echo Chambers in Social Media: Why do People Seek or Reject Opposing Viewpoints.”

Biology major Chris Shimwell ’20 presented “Molecular Identification of the Scorpion Telson Microbiome.” He said, “Presenting at a national conference is a valuable experience because it allows you to synthesize information into an audio-visual format and present it to others who are highly educated and knowledgeable about your field.”

Jacob Dayton ’19, a biology major who presented two projects – one on the genetic diversity of a migratory bird group and one on the behaviors of strawberry poison-dart frogs – added that the value of presenting at national conferences is threefold.

“One, it provides students with the opportunity to practice communicating their research to a diverse audience. Two, questions and comments from audience members challenge students to defend and/or expand their thinking. And three, it provides the opportunity to publicize Eastern and the quality research that its students are conducting.”

Students also cited being exposed to new research questions during others’ presentations, interacting with peers from across the country, and sharing the NCUR experience with their Eastern friends as highlights of the conference. Psychology Professors Carlos Escoto and James Diller and Biology Professor Patricia Szczys accompanied the Eastern group.

NCUR was established in 1987. From a pool of several thousand applicants, students are accepted into the conference if their research demonstrates a unique contribution to their field of study. NCUR offers undergraduates the opportunity to present their research findings to peers, faculty and staff from colleges and universities across the nation, providing a unique networking and learning opportunity.

Written by Michael Rouleau

Mohegan Tribal Chief Named Eastern’s Commencement Speaker

 Marilynn “Lynn” Malerba, chief of the Mohegan Tribe, will be the Commencement Speaker at Eastern Connecticut State University’s 129th Commencement Exercises on May 21 at the XL Center in Hartford. Malerba will also receive an honorary doctorate degree at the ceremonies.

Malerba has achieved an exemplary career in the health care and tribal governance fields. Not only has she served her community with distinction, she has brought national recognition to the State of Connecticut.

Chief Mutáwi Mutáhash (Many Hearts) Marilynn “Lynn” Malerba became the 18th Chief of the Mohegan Tribe on August 15, 2010, and is the first female chief in the tribe’s modern history. The position is a lifetime appointment made by the tribe’s council of elders. She previously served as chairwoman of the tribal council and was also executive director of health and human services for the tribal government.

Prior to her work for the Mohegan Tribe, Chief Malerba had a distinguished career as a registered nurse and served as director of cardiology and pulmonary services at Lawrence and Memorial Hospital. She earned her Doctor of Nursing Practice degree at Yale University and was named a Jonas Scholar. She holds a master’s degree in Public Administration from the University of Connecticut, and has an honorary doctorate from the University of St. Joseph in West Hartford.

Chief Malerba has achieved a national reputation as an advocate and supporter of health issues and the welfare of Native Peoples. She is chairwoman of the Tribal Self-Governance Advisory Committee of the Federal Indian Health Services; is a member of the U.S. Justice Department’s Tribal Nations Leadership Council; serves on the Tribal Advisory Committee for the National Institute of Health; is a member of the U.S. Treasury Department’s Tribal Advisory Committee; and serves as a technical expert on the Commission for Environmental Cooperation. She also serves as the United South and Eastern Tribes board of directors secretary, and is a member of the board of directors for the Ms. Foundation for Women.

In Connecticut, Chief Malerba serves as a trustee for Chelsea Groton Bank, as a board member for the Community Foundation of Eastern Connecticut, as an advisory committee member for the Harvard University Native American Program and served on the board of directors for Lawrence Memorial Hospital for 11 years.

More than 1,200 undergraduate and graduate students will receive their diplomas at Eastern’s graduation exercises on May 21, with an audience of more than 10,000 family and friends expected. In addition to Malerba, dignitaries expected to attend include Eastern President Elsa Núñez; Mark Ojakian, president of the Connecticut State Colleges and Universities System; and Merle Harris, vice-chair of the Board of Regents for Higher Education.

Written by Ed Osborn

‘Opportunity Comes in Weird Ways’: English Alumni Speak on Career Paths

Eastern English alumni, left to right: Ryan Bahan ’15, Angela DiLella ’14, Jennifer Kuhn ’08 and Chris Morris ’18

WILLIMANTIC, CT (04/11/2019) A long-lived question that has followed the English major is, “What will you do with that degree?” In response, the English Department at Eastern Connecticut State University has hosted “English at Work” panels, combatting stereotypes and emphasizing the complexity of the field. Alumni gathered on April 8 to discuss their careers in writing, editing and publishing.

Panelists included Ryan Bahan ’15, Angela DiLella ’14, Jennifer Kuhn ’08 and Christopher Morris ’18. With an impressive turnout for the event, they spoke on establishing themselves professionally and finding the right path after graduation.

Bahan explained that post-undergraduate employment is “a mix of what you want to do and what your first job is going to be.” After graduating from Eastern, he received a fellowship at the Champlain College Emergent Media Center to manage digital projects while obtaining a master’s degree in digital media.

Completing his master’s in 2016, Bahan initially worked as a website designer and podcast producer. He also explored blogging and other side jobs before joining Stagecoach Digital as a content strategist in 2017. Now, he produces content and provides strategic direction for North America’s leading nonprofit organizations.

DiLella and Kuhn echoed sentiments about unexpected placement, landing job roles that they did not necessarily see themselves in as undergraduate students. DiLella went on to earn a Master of Fine Arts (MFA) in Writing from the New School, which she feels granted new creative opportunities. In addition to finishing her graphic novel, DiLella is employed by N3rdabl3 (Nerdable), a gaming and pop culture website. She ghostwrites novellas and larger projects as well.

“I had no idea what I wanted to do with my English degree,” said Kuhn, who called her professional journey “a series of lucky breaks and happy accidents.” She received a Master of Professional Studies from George Washington University and has held several leadership positions working on scientific, technical and medical publications.

Kuhn is the editorial director at Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, a division of Wolters Kluwer health-information services based in Philadelphia. Further, she owns and operates the world’s only print periodical for childcare workers, Nanny Magazine. “I never knew when I was at Eastern that I was going to love this.”

Morris is the editorial assistant at the award-winning, independent press Elephant Rock Books, where he interned as an Eastern student. His responsibilities involve editorial work on all manuscripts approved for publication, designing and executing marketing campaigns and assisting in organizing events. “I have my hands in most components of what we do,” he said. Morris is in the process of meeting with literary agents about his first novel, “The Kids Who Killed on Church Street,” and plans to pursue a MFA at the University of Mississippi this fall.

Throughout the event, the panelists addressed different ways in which being an English major prepared them for professional endeavors. One significant skill they picked up at Eastern is the ability to recognize audience. Another is learning to not only accept, but constructively utilize criticism. Collectively, they agreed that the mentors they had access to were a great benefit.

“Get involved on campus in whatever capacity makes sense to you,” Kuhn advised to undergraduates. “Always be hungry to learn something more.” As recommended by the group, some on-campus resources for English majors are the Campus Lantern, the Writing Center, the University Relations office and the Creative Writing Club. “Eastern is so flexible in terms of what you can do,” said Bahan.

“Opportunity comes in weird ways,” continued DiLella. “Don’t be afraid to step outside your major.” Morris, who double-majored, commended his experiences with the History Department. Taking history classes required him to increase his attention to detail and ultimately provided useful context for writing and literature. Moreover, he noted the importance of writing regularly, which was guaranteed in his chosen academic realms. “Writing is like an instrument,” he said, regarding the need to put in consistent work in order to master the craft.

Despite advocating for seizing a variety of chances, Bahan suggested, “Don’t work for free. If you don’t value yourself, people never will.” He pointed out the rise in remote employment as a means of entering the paid job force. “It’s easier than ever to work for companies all over the world.” Similarly, panelists highlighted the advantages of networking, building a solid support system and understanding time management. “Find your balance,” said DiLella.

Written by Jordan Corey

Annual CREATE Conference to Showcase Student Art, Research

 

WILLIMANTIC, CT (04/08/2019) Eastern Connecticut State University will host its premier academic and artistic conference of the year on April 12. CREATE – Celebrating Research Excellence and Artistic Talent at Eastern – will take place from 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. in the Student Center and surrounding venues. An award ceremony with remarks by Eastern President Elsa Núñez will take place at 12:30 p.m. in the Betty R. Tipton Room of the Student Center.

Hundreds of student researchers, artists and performers will present their talents at CREATE. Students from all majors will lead oral and poster presentations, participate in panel discussions, showcase music and dance performances, exhibit their art and photography, and present documentary films and more.

Registration will take place at 8 a.m. at the Student Center Café. President Núñez will present two undergraduate awards and two mentor awards to outstanding students and faculty members at the 12:30 p.m. award ceremony.

For more information, visit http://www.easternct.edu/create/, where you can view the day’s agenda and download the event’s cell phone app for iPhone and Android.

Written by Michael Rouleau

Annual CREATE Conference to Showcase Student Art, Research

Eastern Connecticut State University will host its premier academic and artistic conference of the year on April 12. CREATE – Celebrating Research Excellence and Artistic Talent at Eastern – will take place from 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. in the Student Center and surrounding venues. An award ceremony with remarks by Eastern President Elsa Núñez will take place at 12:30 p.m. in the Betty R. Tipton Room of the Student Center.

Students present research during the poster session of the 2018 CREATE conference.

Hundreds of student researchers, artists and performers will present their talents at CREATE. Students from all majors will lead oral and poster presentations, participate in panel discussions, showcase music and dance performances, exhibit their art and photography, and present documentary films and more.

Registration will take place at 8 a.m. at the Student Center Café. President Núñez will present two undergraduate awards and two mentor awards to outstanding students and faculty members at the 12:30 p.m. award ceremony.

For more information, visit http://www.easternct.edu/create/, where you can view the day’s agenda and download the event’s cell phone app for iPhone and Android.

Written by Michael Rouleau

Eastern’s Raouf Mama Wins Storytelling Award

Raouf Mama (middle) with workshop participants at the annual conference for the Benin National Teachers of English Association (BNTEA) this January.

English Professor Raouf Mama recently received an award from the Benin National Teachers of English Association (BNTEA) for “Outstanding Storytelling and Service to English Teaching.” The BNTEA’s second annual conference was held from Jan.17-19 in Parakou, Benin. The conference recognizes English teachers for expanding the English language throughout the country of Benin and worldwide.

At the conference, Mama gave a plenary address titled “The Pursuit of Excellence in the Learning and Teaching of English.” He also led three workshops titled “Better Storytelling Skills Make Better Teachers.”

Mama performs African and multicultural stories, blending storytelling with poetry, song, music and dance. An orator out of the African oral tradition, he has been a keynote speaker at literary award ceremonies and fundraisers, as well as a plenary speaker at international and regional conferences in the U.S., Benin, Guatemala, Costa Rica and Venezuela.

Written by Bobbi Brown

‘English Night’ Celebrates Student Excellence

Fall 2018’s cohort of Sigma Tau Delta inductees.

Written by Jordan Corey

WILLIMANTIC, Conn. — The English Department held its end-of-semester celebration of student excellence on Dec. 5 in the Betty R. Tipton Room. “English Night” featured an awards ceremony, induction into the Sigma Tau Delta honor society, and student presentations.

“The English Department has been hosting English Night at the end of each semester for decades,” said Barbara Little-Liu, English professor and department chair. “We want to recognize the interesting, innovative and high-quality scholarship and creative work our students are doing in their capstone courses.

Mikayla Fish presents during the poster session of English Night.

“Additionally,” she added, “the various awards, scholarships and other forms of recognition give us a chance to celebrate all of our outstanding students, from freshmen to seniors.”

The Constance Campo Memorial Scholarship was given to Kay Daniels ’19. The scholarship was established in memory of Constance Campo, a long-time member of the English Department staff. The scholarship is for a non-traditional student who has demonstrated excellence in their studies and has shown sensitivity to gender and diversity issues as Campo did.

The Alexander “Sandy” Taylor Memorial Scholarship was given to Keara Berisso ’19. The scholarship was launched by family, friends and colleagues of Sandy Taylor, who was a scholar, Eastern professor and publisher. The award is for an English major, particularly someone who demonstrates a commitment to peace and human rights and who shows an interest in poetry.

Recipients of the First Year Writing Awards were Abby Wilson ’22 and Victoria Bryer ’21. These are given to students in the “College Writing” and “College Writing Plus” courses whose writing is innovative, creative, well-researched or uniquely articulated.

Monica Muriel presents her senior seminar project to a large audience.

Following the awards ceremony, 32 students were inducted into the Sigma Tau Delta international honor society. In order to qualify, English students must have completed a minimum of four 200-level English courses, a minimum average GPA of 3.5 in English courses, and an overall 3.0 GPA. Members are eligible for select scholarships, internship opportunities and other benefits.

English Night closed with senior seminar presentations from the capstone course “The Rhetoric of Crime.” “The students engaged an important issue: the ways that crime is represented in the media and in fiction,” explained Professor Rita Malenczyk of the seminar.

English Department Chair Barbara Little-Liu gives the English Night opening remarks.

Monica Muriel ’19 presented “The Misrepresentation of Crime in the Media and Its Detrimental Effects on the Public,” and Ashlee Shefer ’19 presented “The Safest Place on Earth.” Following presentations, English Night attendees engaged in a poster session, viewing senior projects by Mikayla Fish ’19, Jolee Iannantuoni ’19, Zoe Stephen ’19, Jessica Maloney ’19 and Alec Taylor ’19.

“Over the years, we’ve expanded English Night to include work not just from the capstone seminar classes, but also posters from students completing their capstone in independent directed research,” said Liu. “Eastern’s English Department is blessed with so many talented, intelligent and engaged students. I’m always happy and excited to host this recognition of their accomplishments.”

Eastern Holds Third Civic Action Conference

Eastern President Elsa Nunez

Written by Dwight Bachman

Eastern students have a reputation of service to community that goes back decades. But at the Third Annual Civic Action Conference on Nov. 14, it was demonstrated how much students actually learn as a result of their service.

Eastern President Elsa Nunez introduced the idea of structured service learning in 2009, when she established the Center for Community Engagement (CCE), directed by Kim Silcox.

Nunez celebrated Eastern’s faculty for its commitment to organized, systematic service learning. “Students need to ask why people are suffering, and truly reflect on what they can do,” she said. “Getting faculty involved by connecting class curriculum to community needs will increase civic action in a meaningful way. It is so gratifying to see our students embrace this, as it reflects Eastern’s core values”

A wide range of speakers focused on four themes at the conference: 1.) writing assignments to promote civic action; 2.) employability and community engagement; 3.) higher education as a public good; and 4.) community engagement research.

“The conference highlights the amazing work Eastern faculty have achieved in engaging students in the community,” said Silcox, who organized the conference along with Nicolas Simon, assistant professor of sociology. “Students participating in service learning projects are engaging in research, thinking critically and expressing themselves as they reflect on the experiences. These are key marketable skills in today’s job market.”

Part-time lecturer Lucy Hurston and Nicholas Simon, assistant professor of sociology.

Part-time lecturer Lucy Hurston focuses on learning outcomes rather than just the student-volunteer experience. She had students conduct research on numerous issues, including homelessness and poverty. Students volunteered on a Habitat for Humanity housing project. The activity helped students change their perceptions of lower-income populations.

Sociology Professor Cara Bergstrom-Lynch

Sociology Professor Cara Bergstrom-Lynch’s intensive writing course requires students to focus on social inequalities and to identify solutions. “Students then develop a research project through a sociological lens and write a research paper,” said Bergstrom-Lynch.

English Professor Miriam Chirico

English Professor Miriam Chirico’s students focused on urban revitalization. “The goal,” she said, “is to have students come together to create a social network that helps enhance writing about tourism and increase pride in community.” Through the experience, students reinforced their civic commitment and simultaneously developed writing and rhetorical skills.

Education Professor David Stoloff

Addressing the theme of employability and civic engagement, Art and Art History Professor Terry Lennox’s students creatively design with the intent “to advance the communication and marketing outcomes of non-profit organizations. It is a collaborative, guided effort designed to learn the value of art and also show what we all can do, working together,” she said. Through these projects, students build portfolios, which contributes to their employability upon graduating.

Fatma Pakdil, associate professor of business administration, examined employability from a market perspective. She presented statistics showing that “only 11 percent of business leaders agree that today’s college graduates have the skills and competencies their businesses need, while 96 percent of chief academic officers say their institutions are very or somewhat effective at preparing students for the world of work.” Pakdil proposed affording students courses that enable students “to study on projects analyzing real problems, issues and bottlenecks faced by business organizations,” which she believes will better prepare students for the work place.

Associate Professor of Business Information Systems (BIS) Alex Citurs and student Rebekah Brancato, a BIS major, with a minor in Healthcare Informatics, showed how community-based projects help students gain practical experience and make meaningful contributions to communities. Students also gain insight into new ways of doing things and building relationships for future collaborations. The work in information systems that he and his students do, which many organizations cannot afford from professional consultants, improves the operations of non-profit organizations.

Education Professor David Stoloff examined pre-service education as a positive dimension of civic engagement. His students participate in projects in local school and community centers. They write reflections on these experiences at mid-term and at the end of the semester. Stoloff said the goal is to teach students “knowledge, skills, responsibility and commitment within social justice views of civic engagement.”

John Murphy, lecturer in the Department of Communication

John Murphy, lecturer in the Department of Communication, uses local radio, television, web sites, social and print media to demonstrate the value of service learning. Students use various media — digital platforms included — to share stories about the important assets of organizations and people served. This creates opportunities for students to build portfolios and provides information to the community on valuable, underutilized resources available in the community.

Geography Professor Patrick Vitale’s “Geography of Food” class made community-engagement research a campus project. Their results suggest that many students on campus experience food insecurity. The students examined the impact of food insecurity, the resources that are available to support students, and what other universities are doing to address this crisis. “Their research shows the political and educational potential of a class that engages students to take on a pressing concern in their community,” said Vitale.

Yolanda Bergstrom-Lynch, a campus librarian, said “It is vital that librarians have a seat at the table as service learning partners.” She introduced a “Service Learning and Community Engagement” library research guide that was created in collaboration with the Center for Community Engagement. The publication serves as a resource guide of the various ways in which librarians promote community engagement. “Librarians serve as bridges, connecting the library to other campus organizations and the campus community to service learning resources in the library.”

Eastern to Host Third Annual Civic Action Conference

Written by Raven Dillon

WILLIMANTIC, CT (11/02/2018) Eastern Connecticut State University will host its third annual Civic Action Conference on Nov. 14 from 9:30 a.m.-3 p.m. in the Johnson Community Room of the J. Eugene Smith Library. The conference is free and open to the public. Registration begins at 9 a.m.

The conference is organized into four overarching themes, each featuring a variety of subtopics, such as the role of service learning in urban revival and career-readiness via community-based projects. At lunch, keynote speaker Thomas Piñeros-Shields of University of Massachusetts-Lowell will discuss his sociological research about immigration policy, youth civic engagement and social movements.

The first theme, “Writing Assignments to Promote Civic Action,” begins at 10 a.m. Eastern sociology professors Cara Bergstrom-Lynch, Lucy Hurston and Nicolas Simon, along with English professor Miriam Chirico, will discuss social justice and service learning through writing.

The second theme, “Employability and Civic Engagement,” begins at 11 a.m. and will explore undergraduate student career readiness. Featured Eastern professors for this segment are Terry Lennox (Art and Art History), Fatma Pakdil (Business Administration) and Alex Citurs (Business Information Systems).

Following theme two is Piñeros-Shields’ luncheon keynote presentation from noon-1 p.m.

The third theme, “Higher Education as a Public Good: Dimensions of Civic Engagement,” begins at 1 p.m. Several presenters from the University of Connecticut will discuss the development and enactment of community-engaged critical conversations through a graduate level course.

The fourth theme, “Community Engagement Research,” will include presentations from Eastern professors Nicolas Simon (Sociology) and Patrick Vitale (Geography), in addition to Yolanda Bergstrom-Lynch, who is a public services librarian and reference lecturer with the J. Eugene Smith Library.

The Civic Action Conference is sponsored by the Center for Community Engagement. For more information, contact Kim Silcox at silcoxk@easternct.edu, John Murphy at murphyjo@easternct.edu or Nicolas Simon at simonn@easternct.edu.