Alumni Recruit Students at 15th Annual Accounting Job Fair

Fiondella, Milone and Lasaracina (FML) auditors and Eastern graduates Alyssa Townsend '17 and Destiny Hartmann '17 speak with students.
Brian Green of the Defense Contract Audit Agency speaks with students about fraud management and job opportunities.
Horizons Inc. representatives speak with an Eastern student.
Nicola Yester auditors and Eastern graduates Nicole Brooks '15 (CPA), Tessa Jordan '07 (CPA and partner) and Carissa Riccio '16 pose with Professor RuJoub at the fair.

 

The Accounting Program at Eastern Connecticut State University hosted its 15th Annual Accounting Job Fair on Oct. 5. With more than 70 students, 17 companies and nearly 25 alumni, the event was busy as students shared resumes and networked with future employers.

The Accounting Job Fair was created by Accounting Professor Mohd RuJoub, who has been teaching at Eastern for 20 years. RuJoub has seen students graduate from Eastern’s Accounting Program and go into careers with top companies such as Blum Shapiro and Travelers, and even earn top positions as vice presidents and managers.

“This career fair has enabled our accounting students to meet employers in an informal setting over the last 15 years and given them the opportunity to learn more about those employers and the opportunities available,” said RuJoub. “Employers were very impressed with the turn out and engagement with our students. Most employers were represented by Eastern accounting alumni—Eastern was represented on both sides of the table, as recruiters and job seekers–it was a sight to see!”

Many Eastern alumni that attended the event expressed the bond they still have with the university. Alumna, Amber Tucker’ 04, who works for the Connecticut-based accounting firm of Fiondella, Milone & LaSarcina stated, “Every Eastern graduate that we’ve worked with has been of extremely high quality.” Tucker, who also teaches auditing in the spring and winter semesters at Eastern, said she enjoys coming back to campus. “It’s great to come back and see my former students working and trying to get their career on the way.”

Alumna Nicole Brooks’ 15, who works for the accounting firm Nicola Yester, recalled her time as an Eastern student when she attended the Accounting Fair. “We’ve hired quite a few Eastern grads as interns… they have good working knowledge and have been well-versed in accounting related topics.”

RuJoub added, “Our alumni are very proud of their alma matter and accounting education that they have received and happy to come back to campus and play an increasingly significant role in our students’ careers, from getting that first internship or full-time job out of college to finding advanced positions.”

Eastern’s Accounting program provides introductory and advanced courses in financial and managerial accounting, auditing, taxation, and accounting information technology and business solutions, as well as teamwork and leadership skills. Senior Jenna Moreiria, who majors in Business Administration and minors in Accounting, spoke highly of the education she received through the Accounting program and her professors. “It gives you a well-rounded education that prepares you for internships and future careers.” With a high interest in tax auditing, Moreiria is aiming to take her skills to Blum Shapiro.

Written by Bobbi Brown

Eastern Named to Princeton Review’s 2020 ‘Best Colleges’ Guide

Eastern Connecticut State University has been recognized by in the Princeton Review in its “2020 Best Colleges” guide for the Northeast region. Featured schools were chosen based on survey results from 140,000 students across the country. Eastern was praised for its small class sizes, close-knit campus community and affordability. 

Home to 5,200 students annually, Eastern students come from 160 of Connecticut’s 169 towns, along with 29 other states and 20 other countries. The 16:1 student to faculty ratio encourages group discussions and teamwork. Eastern offers 41 majors and 59 minors, with a liberal arts curriculum that’s rooted deep in the school’s mission to provide students with a well-rounded education. Eastern was also ranked among the top 25 public universities in the North Region by U.S. News and World Report in its 2020 Best College ratings.

Eastern also offers 18 NCAA Division III sports teams, more than 90 registered student organizations and 17 honors societies. Eastern’s athletic mission is to emphasize values such as diversity, sportsmanship, health, wellbeing and equity. Eastern hosted its annual President’s Picnic and Student-Club Fair. In spring of 2019, more than 50 percent of Eastern students participated in at least one club. Clubs with the highest membership last semester were Eastern Outdoors Club, Freedom at Eastern and People Helping People. Eastern is also home to student services such as the Womens Center, LGBT support groups and minority support groups. Eastern was awarded the ‘Green Campus’ Status by Princeton Review for the ninth year in a row in fall 2018.

Written by Molly Boucher

Courant Names Eastern a ‘Top Workplace’

For the eighth time the Hartford Courant has recognized Eastern Connecticut State University in its “Top Workplaces” survey. With almost 1,000 employees, Eastern ranked 10th in the “large” category, and was the only public higher education institution recognized among 60 organizations in Hartford, Middlesex, Tolland, Windham and New London counties. Results were published on Sept. 22 in the Hartford Courant.

“We are honored to be recognized once again as a top workplace in Connecticut,” said Eastern’s President Elsa Núñez. “Even though Eastern was recognized in the large organization category, our university has always prided itself on being a close-knit community and a welcoming, inclusive campus for students, faculty and staff. The Courant’s announcement reminds us that Eastern is a stable, inspiring place for our faculty and staff to come to work each day, and a supportive learning environment for our students. I am very pleased that we were among those recognized.”

Surveys were administered on behalf of the Courant by Energage, LLC, a research and consulting firm that has conducted employee surveys for more than 50,000 organizations. Rankings were based on confidential survey results completed by employees of the participating organizations. This year’s Courant survey surveyed 29,000 employees across the state.

The survey included 24 statements, with employees asked to assess each one on a scale from “strongly agree” to “strongly disagree.” Topics included organizational direction, workplace conditions, effectiveness, managers and compensation. Each company was assigned a score based on a formula.

To honor all “Top Workplaces,” The Hartford Courant held its annual awards program on Sept. 19 at the Aqua Turf Club in Plantsville, CT, where it announced the top workplaces in each category.

Written by Vania Galicia

Eastern a Top 25 Public Regional University in U.S. News and World Report

The class of 2023 gathered for a group photo during the Fall 2019 Warrior Welcome weekend–Eastern draws students from 160 of Connecticut’s 169 towns

 Eastern Connecticut State University is again the highest ranked institution among Connecticut’s four state universities in this year’s U.S. News and World Report’s edition of “Best Colleges.” The 2020 rankings were released on Sept. 9.

This is Eastern’s highest ranking ever as it was ranked 21st among public universities in the North Region. Eastern moved up five spots among public institutions over last year’s rankings and moved up 13 spots when both public and private institutions were considered.

Under the mentorship of Biology Professor Vijaykumar Veerappan, Roshani Budhathoki ’19 was selected for an undergraduate fellowship by the American Society of Plant Biologists (ASPB).

.The North Region includes colleges and universities from New England, New York, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Delaware and Maryland, and is known as the most competitive among the four regions that make up the U.S. News and World Report ranking system.

Regional universities such as Eastern are ranked based on 15 criteria that include peer assessment, graduation and retention rates, class size, faculty resources, admissions selectivity, financial resources and alumni giving.

“Given the uncertain times facing the higher education community, I am delighted to see Eastern achieving its highest ranking ever,” said Eastern President Elsa Nunez. “This is a testament to our commitment to high standards and the faculty and staff’s focus on providing students with personal attention. Our improved ranking this year is due to our rising graduation and retention rates as well as the continued quality of our incoming classes.

 Environmental earth science students traveled to the mountains of Wyoming and Idaho this summer for a geology field course led by Eastern faculty.:

“Students and their families turn to the Best Colleges rankings to help decide where to attend college. These newest rankings reaffirm that Eastern is providing a relevant and high-quality education on our beautiful residential campus.”

This year’s U.S. News and World Report rankings included reviews of upwards of 1,400 schools nationwide and are available at www.usnews.com/colleges. They will also be published in the Best Colleges 2020 Guidebook, published by U.S. News & World Report and available on newsstands on Oct. 15.

For the past 35 years, the U.S. News and World Report rankings, which group colleges based on categories created by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching, have grown to be the most comprehensive research tool for students and parents considering higher education opportunities.

Written by Ed Osborn

Eastern Alumna Salutes Inclusive Excellence Award Winners

On May 9, Eastern recognized more than 100 students with a 3.5 cumulative grade point average or higher, and an additional 11 students who have demonstrated exemplary co-curricular engagement at the University’s Seventh Annual Inclusive Excellence Student Awards Ceremony. The ceremony recognized the achievements of African, Latino, Asian and Native American (ALANA) students at Eastern.

Eastern President Elsa Núñez said the ceremony was not just about inclusion, but also spoke to the University’s other core values of academic excellence, integrity, social responsibility, engagement and empowerment. “It is important for each of you to stand tall and be proud of who you are and what you are capable of. Never, ever, ever let anyone attempt to diminish your worth or your talents.

“Today’s honorees join thousands of other successful Eastern alumni who are making their own personal contributions out in the real world, including our guest speaker today, Dr. Kawami Evans. Today, we show respect and celebrate the accomplishments of students who too often have been forgotten in the past.  Thank you for being part of this celebration; to our honorees, congratulations.  We are very proud of you.”

Keynote speaker Evans ’97 serves as associate director at the Center for African Diaspora Student Success at the University of California at Davis. She earned her bachelor’s degree in history and social science at Eastern, her Master of Education in educational policy and research administration from the University of Massachusetts-Amherst and a doctorate in educational management and leadership from Drexel University.

Evans encouraged the students to use their curiosity and optimism to persevere through unseen psychological struggles that can become their staunchest challenges. She said many high- achieving students fall prey to chasing individual achievements, accolades or material gain as their goal, even confusing their self-worth with what they can accomplish.

“This is dangerous; it can lead to anxiety and depression. Don’t let this be your reality or focus,” said Evans. “Who you are is what we are celebrating today. All the earned accolades you are receiving are but a byproduct of the brilliance within you . . . You are the promise of our ancestors’ prayers and walk with the wisdom and swag of those who have grit, resilience, the social and emotional intelligence, curiosity and hope.”

Evans told the students the most important element they need to resurrect in discussing their future success is their spirituality, ways in which students discover their destiny — answers to the big questions of who they are, what is their life purpose and how do they make difference in the world.

“Much of the world right now is relegated to systems and polices. We have to raise the bar with our vision of what’s possible,” Evans said. “It will take hard work, community, love, bravery, unrelentless effort and celebration.  I sincerely believe that we can create a world that works for all.”

A total of 280 students qualified for an Academic Excellence Award with a 3.5 cumulative GPA or higher, and more than 100 of them were able to attend the May 9 event. During the ceremony, several students received service awards. Adrianna Arocho and Mayra Santos Acosta was presented the Volunteer Service Award; Aiyana Ward, the Athletic Excellence Award; Kimberly Allen and Sommer Bachelor, the Career Development Award; Jenilee Antonetty, the Resident Assistant Diversity Impact Award; Rafael Aragon, the Residential Community Leadership Award; Tristan Perez, the Social Justice Advocacy Award; Emma Costa, the Inspirational Leadership Award; Ishah Azeez, the Resilient Warrior Award; Kimberly Allen and Vishal Jungiwalla, the Advisor’s Choice Award; and the Freedom at Eastern Club, the Building Bridges Award.

By Dwight Bachman

Hundreds Gather for 25th Annual Accounting Banquet

Keynote speaker and alumnus Jason Handel ’04 address the Betty Tipton Room crowd.

The Accounting Program at Eastern Connecticut State University hosted its 25th Annual Accounting Banquet on April 25. With more than 200 students, faculty and alumni in attendance, the event included an award ceremony and keynote speech by alumnus Jason Handel ’04, CPA and vice president of finance for Jacobs Vehicle Systems.

It is the personal and professional connections made or celebrated in this room tonight that make this an amazing group,” said President Elsa Núñez of the networking opportunities offered by the Accounting Program. Speaking to program coordinator Mohd RuJoub, she added, “Through Dr. Rujoub’s leadership and the inspiration of our founders, this accounting community is truly a family.”

 

A highlight of the evening was an awards ceremony in which 11 outstanding students were awarded scholarships by Accounting Program alumni and dignitaries. The RuJoub Family Scholarship awarded six scholarships. One scholarship each was awarded by the firm BlumShapiro, presented by Frederick Hughes ’87; the firm PFK O’Connor Davies, presented by Katherine Patnaude ’10; the firm Fiondella, Milone & LaSarcina, presented by Amber Tucker ’04; and Founders of Accounting, presented by Professor Emeritus William Sisco.

Keynote speaker Jason Handel’s address was titled “Transitioning from Public Accounting to Private Accounting.” He spoke on his experience in the field and offered advice to students.

Written by Bobbi Brown

43 Strong, Eastern Represents in Georgia at National Conference

With 43 student presenters, Eastern was among the top 20 schools nationwide for NCUR participation, and the only school from New England to make the list.

Forty-three students from Eastern Connecticut State University traveled to Georgia on April 11-13 to present original research at the National Conference on Undergraduate Research (NCUR). The 2019 conference occurred at Kennesaw State University and featured hundreds of undergraduate students from across the country.

Eastern was among the top 20 schools nationwide for NCUR participation this year – the only school from New England to make the list – and one of the few with a student population of less than 6,000.

Eastern students from a range of majors presented artwork, music performances and oral/poster presentations. Research questions probed topics such as the microbiome of scorpions, the link between casual sex and online dating, pop-culture glamorization of eating disorders, and much more.

Adella Dzitko-Carlson presents “Finding Faith in the 21st Century: The Search for the Sacred in John Luther Adams’ “In the Name of the Earth.”

Music major Esther Jones ’20 commented on the experience of performing a lecture-recital. “This experience at NCUR was a milestone in my life because I didn’t think that I could actually do it when the time finally came around. I thought that I would be trembling so badly that my mind would go blank.”

Jones’ piano performance was titled “‘Theme and Variations on an Egyptian Folksong’ by Gamal Abdel-Rahim.” She added, “This experience helped to boost my confidence and has given me courage to face new challenges.”

“One of my greatest takeaways from this conference is how it pushes you and makes you a better academic,” said Michael Tuttle ’19, who majors in psychology and mathematics.

“Presenting at a conference subjects your research to a higher level of scrutiny, challenging your thoughts and ideas. When audience members ask questions and offer suggestions, it pushes you to think critically and creatively.” Tuttle’s presentation was titled “Overconfidence and Impulsivity of College Students in a Cognitive Reflection Task.”

Theresa Parker presents “Echo Chambers in Social Media: Why do People Seek or Reject Opposing Viewpoints.”

Biology major Chris Shimwell ’20 presented “Molecular Identification of the Scorpion Telson Microbiome.” He said, “Presenting at a national conference is a valuable experience because it allows you to synthesize information into an audio-visual format and present it to others who are highly educated and knowledgeable about your field.”

Jacob Dayton ’19, a biology major who presented two projects – one on the genetic diversity of a migratory bird group and one on the behaviors of strawberry poison-dart frogs – added that the value of presenting at national conferences is threefold.

“One, it provides students with the opportunity to practice communicating their research to a diverse audience. Two, questions and comments from audience members challenge students to defend and/or expand their thinking. And three, it provides the opportunity to publicize Eastern and the quality research that its students are conducting.”

Students also cited being exposed to new research questions during others’ presentations, interacting with peers from across the country, and sharing the NCUR experience with their Eastern friends as highlights of the conference. Psychology Professors Carlos Escoto and James Diller and Biology Professor Patricia Szczys accompanied the Eastern group.

NCUR was established in 1987. From a pool of several thousand applicants, students are accepted into the conference if their research demonstrates a unique contribution to their field of study. NCUR offers undergraduates the opportunity to present their research findings to peers, faculty and staff from colleges and universities across the nation, providing a unique networking and learning opportunity.

Written by Michael Rouleau

Annual CREATE Conference to Showcase Student Art, Research

 

WILLIMANTIC, CT (04/08/2019) Eastern Connecticut State University will host its premier academic and artistic conference of the year on April 12. CREATE – Celebrating Research Excellence and Artistic Talent at Eastern – will take place from 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. in the Student Center and surrounding venues. An award ceremony with remarks by Eastern President Elsa Núñez will take place at 12:30 p.m. in the Betty R. Tipton Room of the Student Center.

Hundreds of student researchers, artists and performers will present their talents at CREATE. Students from all majors will lead oral and poster presentations, participate in panel discussions, showcase music and dance performances, exhibit their art and photography, and present documentary films and more.

Registration will take place at 8 a.m. at the Student Center Café. President Núñez will present two undergraduate awards and two mentor awards to outstanding students and faculty members at the 12:30 p.m. award ceremony.

For more information, visit http://www.easternct.edu/create/, where you can view the day’s agenda and download the event’s cell phone app for iPhone and Android.

Written by Michael Rouleau

Annual CREATE Conference to Showcase Student Art, Research

Eastern Connecticut State University will host its premier academic and artistic conference of the year on April 12. CREATE – Celebrating Research Excellence and Artistic Talent at Eastern – will take place from 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. in the Student Center and surrounding venues. An award ceremony with remarks by Eastern President Elsa Núñez will take place at 12:30 p.m. in the Betty R. Tipton Room of the Student Center.

Students present research during the poster session of the 2018 CREATE conference.

Hundreds of student researchers, artists and performers will present their talents at CREATE. Students from all majors will lead oral and poster presentations, participate in panel discussions, showcase music and dance performances, exhibit their art and photography, and present documentary films and more.

Registration will take place at 8 a.m. at the Student Center Café. President Núñez will present two undergraduate awards and two mentor awards to outstanding students and faculty members at the 12:30 p.m. award ceremony.

For more information, visit http://www.easternct.edu/create/, where you can view the day’s agenda and download the event’s cell phone app for iPhone and Android.

Written by Michael Rouleau

Finance Panel Examines US Economy 10 Years after Recession

Panelists included Eastern Accounting Professor Candice Deal, guest speaker Jeffrey Fuhrer of the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, Business Administration Professor Chiaku Chukwuogor, Economics Professor Brendan Cunningham and panelist Randall Peteros of the Royal Bank of Canada.

The Business Administration department at Eastern Connecticut State University hosted a panel on Feb. 5 to discuss the United States economy 10 years after the 2008 recession. The panel featured a range of professionals who raised points about what caused the economic crash, who was impacted and how the economy has changed since then.

Panelists included Jeffrey Fuhrer and Randall Peteros of the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston and Royal Bank of Canada, respectively, along with Eastern professors Brendan Cunningham and Candice Deal. The event was moderated by Chiaku Chukwuogor, chair of the Department of Business Administration.

Fuhrer is the executive vice president and senior policy advisor at the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston. He has been active in economic research for more than 30 years and has published extensively. To begin his presentation, Fuhrer broke the financial recession of 2008 into three parts — the liquidity crisis, the credit crisis and the economic crisis.

“Those were scary times,” he said. “We did not know where the bottom was by a long shot. It was conceivable that what we were looking at was the beginning of an episode that would rival the Great Depression.”

He explained that liquidity deals with short-term borrowing. When the economy struggled, such financing became largely unavailable, in part because of uncertainty surrounding repayments. “People who might otherwise provide money to non-financial firms and to other financial firms were worried about whether those firms would actually be solvent, whether they could actually survive for the next week or even the next few days.” Fuhrer provided an array of diagrams and statistics, like a “reverse EKG” chart that highlighted the unusual borrowing rates.

According to Fuhrer, one solution was that banks were given federal money to allow for short-term funding, awarded in “term auction facilities.” This money was auctioned off rather than handed out, creating an environment of competitive bidding for borrowers. “It wouldn’t be a sign of weakness if you went to this facility to borrow. That was important,” said Fuhrer. Funding granted lending terms that could be extended, in turn offering people newfound stability. The initiative was retired by the beginning of 2010 when short-term markets were mostly restored.

He continued by delving into the credit and economic components of the financial crash, going over the trouble with assets reliant on mortgage payment along with the “duel-trigger” hit of simultaneous disruption in income and home value. The interconnectedness of commercial systems during this time led to a mess that made assets unstable for even those who tried to plan carefully. “This wasn’t just about crazy subprime borrowing and lending. It wasn’t just stupid people doing stupid things,” Fuhrer emphasized. “Twenty-five percent of all mortgages went under water.”

Toward the end of his presentation, Fuhrer noted that the current monetary policy for the U.S. economy is in a “neutral zone,” which “is a good thing.” While he agreed there always need to be some regulations implemented to safeguard against economic risks, he feels that nothing can guarantee protection from financial downfall.

“No matter what we put in place, we’re probably going to get ourselves into trouble, because that’s what we do as humans.” He reiterated that financial crises have happened globally throughout history and should be examined in conversation with one another to better understand how these major upsets can happen.

Following the opening lecture, remaining panelists had their own segments to analyze various aspects of the recession. Cunningham, a professor of economics at Eastern, went first, unpacking the microeconomics of what happened from a longer-term perspective. He has published numerous peer-reviewed papers and book chapters in addition to previously serving as co-editor of the Journal of Media Economics.

He drew on the work of Kenneth Arrow, an economist, mathematician and political theorist who received a Nobel Prize in economics partially due to his fundamental welfare theorems. “Like any proof, his proofs were built upon some assumptions,” said Cunningham. He described the four assumptions, which make statements regarding consumerism, competition and financial availability. One argument, he stated, is that the government should function as closely as possible to Arrow’s pre-conditions. “Maybe we’d be less likely to see such a disruptive and destructive financial crisis as we did in 2008.” Among the topics he considered were accountant responsibility, “imperfect” information and regulations in relation to efficiency.

Accounting Professor Candice Deal serves on several university committees and faculty search committees, and is a member of the American Accounting Association and Beta Gamma Sigma. She once worked as a grant manager for the National Science Foundation, managing a $1 million dollar grant. During the panel discussion, Deal used her home country, the Bahamas, as a reference to address how the 2008 economic crash affected those outside of the United States.

“The financial crisis had a large impact on Caribbean countries, specifically the Bahamas” Deal started. She contended three reasons why this occurred — close proximity, the US being one of their major trading partners and the decline of tourism. While Americans “were feeling the pinch financially,” as Deal put it, they were unable to travel to the Bahamas, thus directly influencing the Bahamian economy.

“We’re not talking about small numbers here and there. The impact was so bad that the hotels in the country had employees working maybe one or two days a week, and they were the lucky ones, because the others were just fired.” She said that about 112,000 people were receiving government unemployment benefits from a population of less than 400,000.

Randall Peteros is the senior vice president of wealth management with the Royal Bank of Canada and an adjunct business administration professor at Eastern. He received a “Best Paper” award at the 25th Annual Association for Global Business Conference in 2009 for his paper “Financial Crisis Investing in Perspective: Probabilities and Human Behavior.” His role in the panel was to talk about financial stocks and bonds, providing modern data points in comparison to past data points. Peteros informed the audience that stocks were down 57 percent from peak-to-trough when the recession finally ended. “To come back to even, you’d have to go up about 132 percent.” Despite the overwhelming negative spike a decade ago, January 2019 marked the best January for stock rates in 30 years, he asserted. “Volatility is back, it seems.”

Written by Jordan Corey