Mendoza-Botelho Conducts Panel on Bolivia’s Political Future

The Bolivia Section of the Latin American Studies Association (LASA) gathered at Harvard University on May 27 — Eastern Political Science Professor Martin Mendoza-Botelho kneeling in front row.

Martin Mendoza-Botelho, a political science professor at Eastern Connecticut State University, attended the Gathering of Bolivianists (Encuentro De Bolivianistas) on May 27 at Harvard University in Boston. Mendoza-Botelho is the chair of the Bolivia Section of the Latin American Studies Association (LASA), which sponsored the gathering.

He conducted a panel titled “Bolivia’s political future: Is the permanence of Evo Morales and MAS in power imminent?” Panelists included Pamela Calla of New York University, Tulia Falleti of the University of Pennsylvania and Laurence Whitehead of Oxford University.

Panelists discussed the political implications of the election of current President Evo Morales by answering questions such as, what is the likelihood of a triumph of President Morales in the next election? And what is the likelihood Evo Morales gets elected, particularly considering the recent constitutional violation for reelection?

More than 50 people from all over the world attended the Gathering of Bolivianists at Harvard, all who are working on issues related to Bolivia. The aim of the event was to serve as an interdisciplinary space for scholars to discuss the work being done on Bolivia.

LASA is the largest professional association in the world for individuals and institutions engaged in the study of Latin America. With more than 12,000 members, more than 65 percent of whom reside outside the United States, LASA brings together experts on Latin America from all disciplines and diverse occupational endeavors from across the globe.

LASA-Bolivia Section’s mission is to deepen and expand knowledge and communication among professionals, students, leaders and communicators in different disciplines and public venues with regard to political, economic, social and cultural processes pertinent to Bolivia and its peoples, and their relations with other countries and people around the world.

Written by Vania Galicia