Quinnipiac’s Law School Dean of Admissions visits Eastern

Mr. Barrett, discussing Law School options, and the President of the Pre-Law Society.

By Alyssa Wessner

On Wednesday October 3rd, the Pre-law Society hosted the Dean of Admissions of Quinnipiac Law School, Mr. Adam Barrett. This was an extremely interesting and informative event. Mr. Barret gave helpful advice on the admission process and how to find a school that best fits your professional objectives. The students who attended left feeling inspired to attend Quinnipiac and Law School in general.

The President of the Pre-law Society, Megan Hull, shared her thoughts on the event: “The atmosphere at the event was one of excitement, we had a bit of a celebrity in the Pre-law world. In essence Mr. Barrett would be one of the many individuals who will review our applications if we chose to apply to Quinnipiac.” As part of his presentation, the Dean emphasized that students need to find a Law School that fits you and your needs. This particular school also offers many opportunities to advance the careers of graduate students in the legal field and related areas, such as combining a law degree with other options such as business. Megan summarized her thoughts on law school in an easy to remember sentence: “Pain is temporary, a Law degree is Forever.”

Pre-Law students and other attendees learning the strong commitment that Law School entails.

Professor Ana Funes at the 50th anniversary of the Society for Asian and Comparative Philosophy in Poland

Professor Ana Funes speaking at the conference in Cracow Poland about her work on the Indian philosophical concept of prāṇa (vital breath),

The Society for Asian and Comparative Philosophy held its 50th anniversary in Poland on early June when more than one hundred philosophers from all around the world came together to discuss topics related to Asian and Non-Western traditions from a cross-cultural philosophical perspective.
One of our professors at Eastern, Assistant Professor Ana Funes, participated in one of the panels with a talk on the role of prāṇa (vital breath) in Indian Philosophy and its use by French feminist philosopher Luce Irigaray.
     Dr. Funes’ current research focuses on the feminist readings of notions related to bodily self-awareness in the Indian tradition. Prāṇa is a notion related to the act of breathing. Each action, each thought is accompanied by one’s own breathing. To breathe is always thought as an individual act. It is one’s own breath that keeps us alive and it is one’s own breathing that leaves at the moment of death. However, it is uncommon to talk about breathing as a shared act, as a relational moment that is created with someone else. Yet, Luce Irigaray’s work calls for the cultivation of breathing to enable our ethical coexistence with the other and the 8th c. commentary on the Sāṃkhyakārikā, the Yuktidīpikā, relates the vital breath of samāna to the function of sharing. In her paper, Ana Funes explores this relational aspect of breathing as capable of creating community and elucidates the meaning given to the term samāna within the classical Sāṃkhya tradition, unique in the Indian theory of the bodily winds.
     Dr. Funes is specialist in Indian Philosophy and French Feminist Phenomenology and teaches the courses on Ethics, Philosophical Perspectives, Asian Philosophies, and Feminist Philosophies in the Philosophy program at Eastern. She will be offering a new course on Buddhist Philosophies during Fall 2018.

Eastern Polisci-Economics student Tess Candler presents her work to members of Congress at Capitol Hill in Washington DC

By Joshua Newhall

Double major polisci-economics student Tess Candler presenting her work in Capitol Hill in Washington, DC.

The Council on Undergraduate Research is national non-profit organization. The goal of the group is to cooperate with legislators and universities in order to encourage undergraduates to assist their professors with research, and to conduct their own. One of the cornerstone events of the organization is its annual Posters on the Hill event that meets every spring on Capitol Hill, Washington DC. The purpose of the event is to gather students from undergraduate programs around the country in one location to present their independent research. These are not your typical presentations though. Rather than explaining research in an academic setting to professors and fellow students, the undergraduates who attend Posters on the Hill have the unique honor of presenting to various members of Congress.

Hundreds of applicants request to attend the prestigious conference every year, but only sixty are accepted. This year, Eastern’s own Tess Candler was selected as one of the few people to present at Posters on the Hill. Needless to say, her presence at this event is indicative of the quality of both Eastern Connecticut State University, and its Political Science and Economics departments. In the Fall, Tess submitted her application for the conference to the Council on Undergraduate Research. The application required an abstract on her research idea, her history with academic presentations, and a letter of recommendation from her advisor. In March, 

Connecticut Representative Joe Courtney shares some moments to chat and pose with Eastern’s Tess Candler during her work in DC.

Tess was informed that her application had been accepted.Tess, along with her advisor Professor Courtney Broscious, traveled to DC together to attend the conference where she presented her research on environmental policy. Specifically, her research project aims at identifying the determinants of environmental policies that conservatives support. Tess’ research found a negative correlation between conservative support for environmental policy and bills that directly increase the size of government, hinder businesses, or decrease states’ rights. Tess hopes this research will prove beneficial to legislators attempting to pass environmental policy.

While at the conference, Tess presented her work to an audience of legislators, academics and students from different corners of the country. Perhaps the most exciting dialogue Tess had during her time in DC was that with Connecticut’s representative Joe Courtney. Tess had a personal conversation with the state representative about the importance of undergraduate research.

Tess’ experience is just another example of an Eastern success story. She noted that she had a great experience at the conference, and enjoyed meeting plenty of academics and representatives of congress. Any student who is interested in undergraduate research should reach out to their academic advisers.

Professor Christopher Vasillopulos invited as Distinguished Scholar to Address the International Association of Greek Philosophy

Political Science Professor Christopher Vasillopulos.

Political Science Professor Vasillopulos will speak this July on the Origins of Globalization at the 30th International Conference of the International Association of Greek Philosophy in Athens, Greece. His presentation will trace the conditions of the formation of the Global economy, beginning with the rise of 5th century Athens, tracing Alexander the Great’s creation of the Hellenistic trading system, the development of Renaissance Venice as the center of international commerce, the impact of the Industrial Revolution and the rise of the Middle Classes in Western Europe, and the role of the United States after World War Two.  The presentation will stress the links between prosperity and liberal political institutions, especially the protection of property rights.  It will indicate the differences between imperialism, which restricts the economic development of colonial peoples, and Globalization, which has been creating hundreds of millions of  middle class people, most spectacularly in India and China.    

 Women in Politics, is it realistic?

By Carleigh Doyle

Women across the world are starting to become more involved in politics and political parties. However, for centuries, that was not the case. Men are historically known to overall be more involved at higher levels politically, automatically due to the assumption made that men are smarter, stronger, and overall more experienced than women. Women in history have been known to be home makers, and stereotyped as the sensitive gender. For myself, as a college student studying a field composed of mostly men, becoming a strong power is often harder than many think.

Although as a whole nation, times have changed and many countries have become more modernized, the stereotypes regarding women and their power is still prevalent. Growing up in a society dominated by men, it becomes hard to break the stereotypes that were put in place years ago. As a woman, you are described to be sensitive, caring, and most importantly the homemaker, responsible for bearing children and taking care of the house. From the time I was young, I declared that I wanted to be a lawyer, focusing on business law through the international sector. That seemed to be a goal, but never reality when looking at the percentage of women in politics.

For years, I was told that I am not capable of achieving academically in comparison to my male counterparts, and thus not capable of being successful in achieving my goals. As a child, what is constantly drilled into our brains is that we ARE capable of doing anything that we put our minds to, no matter how big or how small. But, what I have found is that, in accordance to that statement, it is actually meant in the terms that anything is possible except when you go away from traditional values.

 

Source: The Economist 2012.

After deciding to be one to break the stereotype that was set in place by my ancestors, I had found some information that was clearly shocking. In the case of Rwanda, a country demolished by the Rwandan genocide merely 20 years ago, they have one of the highest percentages of women in parliament in comparison to countries around the world. Is that due to the fact that the male population was almost completely wiped out during the genocide, or is it due to women deciding to make a change in politics and break their stereotype?

In the case of Rwanda, women are not restricted on boundaries. They are a pro-woman country, but the women that are in power are not feminists, they consider both sides, male and female as opinions and thus make decisions after analyzing all of the facts given. Many may think, due to the stereotypes that women will only consider basic human nature necessities, rather than focusing on law making policies, a topic that men are very involved in. In fact, it has been proven that a lot of women have the same characteristics of men when it comes to attitude and opinions.

As a young woman working hard to reach my goal, I have achieved much more than anyone thought that I would, yet the journey has just begun. I still compete everyday in classes filled with men, to voice my opinion, and show that I am equal to them academically. Women in politics is not something out of the ordinary, but in order for many to feel comfortable and work hard, such as myself, the stereotype needs to be broken. It needs to be understood that success is not derived from gender, but derived from how hard each person works, and the amount of time that one puts in.

SUNY Old Westbury Professor Llana Barber visits Eastern

By: Casandra Rivera

“White picket fences, apple orchards” and cookie cutter houses in the suburbs, cross an “unmarked barrier to find condemned mills and poverty in the city”. “How did the city get like this? How did it not affect the suburbs? Is segregation responsible?” These questions ran through my mind as SUNY Old Westbury Professor Llana Barber set the scene and placed me in the city of Lawrence, Massachusetts from 1945 to 2000.

SUNY Old Westbury Professor Llana Barber talking about her new book Latino City at Eastern.

In her recent visit to campus, Barber told the story of Dominican and Puerto Rican individuals migrating to the United States in search of what we know as the “American Dream.” However, what was initially expected from America was far from what they received.

These individuals initially settled in New York City, but the city was enduring an urban crisis: poverty and unemployment were rampant, and it was sometimes not safe. In search of a safer and more prosperous place to start their new lives, they migrated to the city of Lawrence, Massachusetts.

Lawrence was also, experiencing an urban crisis of its own due to what is known as the “suburb boom.” During this time Lawrence’s suburbs “expanded, doubling in size and individuals from the city moved into these suburban areas, causing the city to go through a downward spiral.”

The people of Lawrence were looking for a scapegoat for the city’s decline, someone to blame for the urban crisis, this scapegoat became Dominican and Puerto Rican settlers. These individuals were blamed for bringing poverty, crime, and welfare dependency to the city of Lawrence.

However, through the hard times, Dominican and Puerto Rican residents of Lawrence were determined to prove this narrative false. Instead they halted Lawrence’s decline: they increased the population of the city, they increased funding for schools, they saved local industries that were hanging by a thread and they insured that Hispanics had a voice in the community. It was an act of activism that revitalized the city, these individuals came together to transform the city of Lawrence.

 

 

Polisci Student Adam Murphy Wins Prestigious Fulbright-Hays Scholarship to Study in Indonesia

Adam Murphy (’18) a double major in Political Science and History, with a minor in Asian Studies, has been awarded a Fulbright-Hays Scholarship to study Indonesian language in an intensive language program in Salatiga, Indonesia. Salatiga is a city on the Island of Java, the most populated island in the world. Java is one of Indonesia’s 17,000 islands located in Southeast Asia. This program is sponsored by the Consortium of Teaching Indonesian (COTI) through Cornell University Center for Southeast Asian Studies. Adam will be in Indonesia this summer from June to August, living with a host-family and taking language classes at a local university.  

This is not Adam’s first trip to Indonesia. Last year Adam lived in Yogyakarta, Indonesia through an immersive language program when he was accepted to a fellowship through US-Indonesian Society. During the last program, in addition to taking language classes, Adam taught English at an organization called Stichting Jogja, that offers free English classes to people in poverty. Also, through the program Adam met with national leaders, and scholars, learning about current political events. Some of these leaders included the Minister of State, the Princess of Yogyakarta, Speaker of the House, and Deputy US Ambassador.

“I am ecstatic to return to Indonesia, to continue my language studies. I am very excited to try new foods, meet new people, live in a different area of the country, and of course visit friends I’ve met in my past trip there. I am honored to be accepted to this program and awarded the Fulbright-Hays Scholarship.” 

Adam enjoying coffee and ice cream with some of his Indonesian hosts during his last trip.