Clonakilty, Ireland!

Eastern students and Professor Scisco visit Newgrange, an ancient tomb and spiritual site in Ireland dating back to 3200 BC. With the Eastern contingent were 13 Quinnipiac University students and their faculty members Gary Giumetti and Sharlene Walbaum.

Eastern students and Professor Scisco visit Newgrange, an ancient tomb and spiritual site in Ireland dating back to 3200 BC. With the Eastern contingent were 13 Quinnipiac University students and their faculty members Gary Giumetti and Sharlene Walbaum.

From June 4 to July 2, 14 Eastern psychology majors studied “History of Psychology” at University College Dublin, Ireland, with Assistant Professor Jenna Scisco.  The Republic of Ireland is celebrating the centennial of the 1916 Easter Rising, a revolutionary event that led to Ireland’s ultimate independence from Britain. Students were immersed in Ireland’s fascinating yet turbulent history through a historical walking tour in Dublin’s city center; a visit to the Michael Collins Center in Clonakilty to learn about his critical contributions to the Irish Revolution and Civil War; and a guided tour of Skibbereen Heritage Center to learn about the tragic Great Famine.  The students also visited Kerry Wollen Mill to learn about the wool industry in Ireland and toured the beautiful Ring of Kerry on Ireland’s southwest coast. On another course excursion, the students visited Newgrange, an ancient tomb and spiritual site dating back to 3200 BC, and Clonmacnoise, a monastic site settled in 544 AD. The 14 Eastern students studied alongside 13 Quinnipiac University students.

Students and Professor Scisco visit Newgrange, an ancient tomb and spiritual site in Ireland dating back to 3200 BC. With the Eastern contingent were 13 Quinnipiac University students and their faculty members Gary Giumetti and Sharlene Walbaum.

Eastern students and Jenna Scisco, assistant professor of psychology, visited the Michael Collins  Center in Clonakilty, Ireland, to learn about the contributions Collins made to the 1916 uprising and the Irish Civil War.

By learning about Ireland’s history through these site visits and associated readings, the students came to understand why psychology was late in arriving in Ireland relative to the United States, with modern scientific psychology not appearing in Ireland until the 1950s. The students also had the opportunity to see the Ballinasloe Asylum from the outside, providing a glimpse into Ireland’s past treatment of individuals in these facilities. To wrap up the four weeks in Ireland, students saw “The Wake,” a play at Abbey Theatre in Dublin, featuring an Irish woman with extreme behavior who ultimately was taken to an asylum to assess her mental health.