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Arts and Sciences Research Conference and Exhibition

Written by Michael Rouleau

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Willimantic, Conn. - Eastern Connecticut State University held its 14th Annual Arts and Sciences Research Conference and Exhibition (ASRCE) on April 12. The event featured oral and visual presentations of student-led scientific research and artwork. More than 50 presentations were delivered by students from a range of academic departments. 

 Mike Manzi, a junior majoring in environmental earth science (EES), presented on shoreline erosion due to weathering along Block Island. "I have enjoyed being a part of every step of the scientific process," said Manzi. "The best part is knowing that the information from my project can be used in the future by others doing research in this field."

 "Students studying environmental earth science have the opportunity to carry out exciting field-based research," said EES Professor William Cunningham. "Last summer undergraduates carried out original and important research in Idaho, Spain and various localities around southern New England. Their findings were presented at Saturday's event."

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At the ASRCE, Mathematics Professor Mizan Khan won the Undergraduate Research and Creative Activity Mentor Award. He was nominated by one of his students, Richard Magner, who has conducted extensive "number theory" research with Khan. 
 "Students who are interested doing research should ask a faculty member about opportunities in their area of interest," said Psychology Professor Madeleine Fugere. "I am always impressed by the quality of the research presented at this event."

Laura Markley, a junior majoring in EES, presented on population, natural resources and sea level rising in Bangladesh. "My research experience at Eastern has provided me with invaluable hands-on field experience," said Markley. "I'm lucky to be able to present on topics that interest me and address real-world problems."

"This event gives students the chance to experience the 'next step' in the research process: presentation," said Peter Bachiochi, psychology professor and faculty mentor. "It is very motivating for them."

"As a faculty mentor it is very rewarding to see your students present. It represents the culmination of a lot of hard work," said Fugere. "The ASRCE is one of the best academic events all year."

Annual Eastern Excellence Expo Set for April 15

Written by Dwight Bachman


Willimantic, Conn: -- Eastern Connecticut State University's School of Education/Professional Studies and Graduate Division will hold its 14th Annual Excellence Expo on April 15, 2014, from 1-3p.m. in the Student Center.  The public is invited. Admission is free.

More than 110 students, supported by 10 faculty mentors, will present research projects and posters showcasing the five departments in the School of Education/Professional Studies and Graduate Division: Business Administration, Communication, Economics, Education, and Health and Physical Education.
Presentations include business marketing plans and communication advertising campaigns;  research presentations from business and education students; and a gallery photography exhibit of framed prints and color slides, just to name a few.  Poster research includes topics on communication law and ethics; health communication issues; and systems analysis.

For more information on the Excellence Expo, contact Pat Kucharski at (860) 465-5264 or email her at kucharski@easternct.edu.

Eastern Hosts 2014 Research and Exhibition Conference

Written by Jordan Sakal


Willimantic, Conn. -  Eastern Connecticut State University will host its annual Arts and Sciences Research Conference & Exhibition on April 12 from 8:30 to 1:30 p.m. This annual event highlights student creative activity undertaken within the 11 departments and 13 majors in the School of Arts and Sciences.

 The conference is a forum for Arts & Sciences students to give oral and poster presentations of research they have conducted while at Eastern.  Students will also be reading poetry, discussing interpretations of literature, and displaying artwork. This exhibition will be the first ever to feature an award presented to faculty mentors for services to their student researchers.
 
 The award is student-nominated, and draws attention to the fact that Eastern students and faculty contribute to scholarly fields of inquiry beyond the classroom. The opening ceremonies of the conference will begin at 9 a.m. in room 104 of the Science Building. There will brief introductory remarks by Professor Nick Parsons, Dean Martin Levin of the School of Arts and Sciences, President Elsa Núñez and Provost Rhona Free.

Chief Justice Rogers and Judge Kahn to Speak at Eastern

Written by Michael Rouleau

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Willimantic, Conn. - Two high-level Connecticut court officials will speak at Eastern Connecticut State University on March 26 for Eastern's University Hour series. At 3 p.m. in the Student Center Theatre, Chief Justice Chase T. Rogers and Superior Court Judge Maria Kahn will speak with the Eastern community about justice and the judicial system in today's world. 

Born and raised in Angola, Africa, Kahn was appointed a Superior Court Judge in 2006 and currently is assigned to hear criminal matters in the Fairfield Judicial District Courthouse. She moved to the United States at 10 years of age, is fluent in three languages and serves on a number state and national Bars. 

Rogers, a Connecticut native, was sworn in as Chief Justice of the Connecticut Supreme Court in 2007--the second woman ever to reach this designation in Connecticut. She was also appointed by President Barack Obama to serve on the State Justice Institute's Board of Directors. In addition to serving on a number of prestigious Bars and committees, Rogers is also an adjunct professor at the University of Connecticut School of Law.

"The event is open to the public and will be organized in a question-and-answer format," said Starsheemar Byrum, coordinator of the Women's Center. "Arrive early at the Student Center Theatre to ensure a good seat."

Majors Fair Helps Undeclared Students Choose Course of Study

Written by Michael Rouleau

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Willimantic, Conn. - Back by student demand, the Majors Fair occurred on March 13 in the Betty R. Tipton Room in Eastern Connecticut State University's Student Center. The Majors Fair, intended to help students with undeclared majors pinpoint a course of study, brought together faculty from all academic departments in one room for students to speak with.

 The Student Government Association (SGA), in collaboration with the Advising Services Center, organized and promoted the event, which hosted more than 20 informational tables staffed by faculty and served roughly 60 undeclared students.

"I'm leaning towards a major either in women's studies or social work," said undeclared freshman Kayla Enwerem. "I want to work with people, and the subject matter of these majors is real eye-opening to me."

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 Last semester the SGA conducted a survey that showed that undeclared students felt "ignored." This response encouraged SGA Student Issues Committee Chair Emily McDonald, a senior majoring in psychology, to reinstate the event--which had not taken place for several years due to lack of interest. "I switched majors earlier in my college career," said McDonald, "so I can relate to the struggle of an undeclared major not knowing what to study or where to go."

 "Business administration is my number one prospect," said undeclared freshman Alex Obernier. "I came to the Majors Fair to learn about different minors and concentrations. I'm considering minoring in marketing. Next semester I'll declare."

The Majors Fair was also promoted at local high schools for incoming Eastern freshmen. "I like the early childhood education major," said incoming freshman Amber Dupont, a senior at Windham High School. "In school I've done a couple of 'observations' and I find the work interesting, and I just really like working with little kids."

"I think I'll go with either education or business administration," said undeclared freshman Rebecca Pilney. "I came to a liberal arts school so I could test the waters and try a bit of everything."

"Eastern in 4," Eastern's Revamped Academic Plan

Written by Michael Rouleau


Willimantic, Conn. - As part of Eastern Connecticut State University's 2013-18 Strategic Plan, "Eastern in 4" is now a requirement for current students and incoming freshmen. The goal of "Eastern in 4" is to lay out a tight and comprehensive plan--including academic and career goals--that will lead students to their bachelor's degrees in four years.

"Eastern in 4" has existed as an informal objective for several years now, but recent data supporting the need for college-career planning has caused the University to revamp and mandate the program. "There are so many options and requirements in a college setting," said Alison Garewski, a professional advisor with the Advising Center. "Students unknowingly taking courses they don't need--costing them more money and prolonging their time in college--is an issue nationwide."

With nearly 1,000 freshman at Eastern this year, approximately 650 have completed their academic plans. Though the plans are designed in group sessions of five to 20 students, each four-year plan is individualized according to a student's degree requirements and preferences--taking into consideration which liberal arts courses to take, internships and study abroad opportunities.

"Every semester when registering for classes I use my four-year plan to aid in my selection," said Christina Harmon, a sophomore majoring in psychology. "'Eastern in 4' was a great way for me to learn what classes I need to take and how to stay on track in order to graduate on time."

While "Eastern in 4" is available to all students and majors, it is especially useful to transfer students, continuing education students and those switching majors. "This program is ideal at Eastern because we're a liberal arts school," said Chris Drewry, a professional advisor with the Advising Center. "Students are required and encouraged to take courses outside of their major, so having this direction is really helpful."

"Before making my 'Eastern in 4' plan, I had no idea if I could fit a double major's worth of classes into my schedule," said Thomas Hacker, a freshman with a double major. "Now I have a roadmap to double major in music and communication in four years."

Prolific Author to Teach Special Course at Eastern

Written by Michael Rouleau

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Willimantic, Conn. - Jeff Benedict, bestselling author, award-winning features writer for Sports Illustrated and Eastern Connecticut State University alumnus, will join Eastern's faculty this summer to teach an upper-level communication course. The prolific writer, teacher and public speaker--and 1991 Eastern graduate--will lead COM 460, "Non-Fiction Writing from Idea to Publication," a three-credit course being held on Saturdays from June 28 to Aug. 9.

 "We are proud of Jeff and his distinguished career in journalism, and happy to have him back on campus," said Eastern President Elsa Núñez. "His work is value-centered and focuses on critical issues of society. Jeff is a role model for young people aspiring to be writers."

COM 460 will cover the stages of non-fiction writing from idea conception to publication. Using Sports Illustrated stories and his own books, Benedict will teach students how to develop story ideas, conduct interviews, structure a story, develop sound writing habits and promote a story. Benedict will use his own story drafts and interview transcripts in his lesson plans; students will also engage in role playing and question-and-answer sessions.

"We are delighted that Jeff will be teaching on our campus this summer," said Eastern Provost Rhona Free. "The students in his course are in for a real treat.  They will be learning from a seasoned pro, one whose straight-forward, engaging writing style has gained critical acclaim and an expanding national readership." Jeff Benecict Jabari Coach K cover.pdf


 Benedict will use one of his latest projects, a Sports Illustrated cover story about the relationship between Duke's head basketball coach Mike Kryzyewski and freshman Jabari Parker.  The story has been featured on CBS News, Fox News Channel and ESPN radio.
 
"Sound writing is a key that has unlocked doors to a rich life of experiences and priceless relationships," Benedict said.  "As a student at Eastern I never imagined I'd make a career out of telling stories.  I am eager to share what I've learned with the students at my alma mater."
 
Students interested in signing up for Benedict's course should visit www1.easternct.edu/ce/jeffbenedict.

Benedict has authored 12 books, including his most recent book, the New York Times bestseller "The System: The Glory and Scandal of Big-Time College Football." His writings have also appeared in the New York Times, Los Angeles Times and SI.com, and have been the basis of programming on 60 Minutes, 20/20, Good Morning America, The Early Show, Dateline and the Discovery Channel.
 
Benedict is a nationally recognized authority on athletes and crime, Indian gaming, eminent domain, and leadership and ethics in business. He is also a distinguished professor of English at Southern Virginia University.

Eastern's University Hour Series

Written by Jordan Sakal

Willimantic, Conn. - Eastern Connecticut State University will be holding eight University Hour events during the spring 2014 semester. The University Hour series includes events held by campus offices or clubs to build awareness on campus of ongoing issues in society. The events are held from 3 to 4 p.m on Wednesdays. at various locations on campus.  

The first event is a seminar on women and wealth set to occur Jan. 22 at 3 p.m. in the Student Center Theatre. Hosted by the Women's Center, the event will help women plan for a healthy financial future.

The semester's second event will occur Feb. 19 at 3 p.m., also in the Student Center Theatre. Sponsored by the Intercultural Center, the event "Half of Me" discusses diversity issues on campus focused on the LGBTQ community.

The semester's third event is "A Conversation with Maurice Clarett." Hosted by the Office of Equity and Diversity in the Student Center Theatre, the former Ohio State University football star discusses his rise to stardom playing college football and the lifestyle he chose that resulted in four years in prison.

Eastern Connecticut State University's Pride Room, Women's Center, Intercultural Center and Office of Equity and Diversity will host Division 1 basketball player Kye Allums on March 5 in the Student Center Theatre. Allums, is the first transgender Division I NCAA athlete.  He will discuss the challenges and triumphs of coming out as a transgender individual with his coaches, teammates and family.

March 12 brings the Girl Rising Project to Eastern, as the Women's Center hosts a groundbreaking feature film in the Student Center Theatre that spotlights the stories of nine unforgettable girls born into unforgiving circumstances.  The film captures their dreams, their voices and their remarkable lives.

On March 26, Chief Justice Chase Rogers of the Connecticut Supreme Court visits Eastern to discuss women and access to justice. The event is hosted by the Women's Center in the Student Center Theatre and seeks to empower women and teach them about their legal rights and responsibilities. 

 Interpersonal violence affects everyone in society.  On April 9 in the Student Center Theatre, Eastern remembers those who survived, faced or lost their lives to intimate partner and sexual violence.  Join the Women's Center for a discussion on current issues relating to interpersonal violence and a community response that empowers all to use their voice, their influence and their actions to become a part of the solution to interpersonal violence.

April 23 is the semester's final University Hour and will cover "The Economic Argument for Ethnic Studies" with host Jim Estrada. The event seeks to enrich professionals so that they become culturally aware of the changing world around them as business becomes increasingly more diverse, multinational and multiethnic.

All University Hour events are free of charge and open to the public.

 

CONNECTICUT PREMIERE OF "OCEAN FRONTIERS II"

Written by Ed Osborn

Willimantic, Conn. -The Connecticut premiere of the film, "Ocean Frontiers II: A New England Story for Sustaining the Sea," will take place on Wednesday, Oct. 30, from 7-8:30 p.m. in Webb Hall Room 110 on the Eastern Connecticut State University campus.

"Ocean Frontiers II" brings audiences face-to-face with those now embarking on the nation's first multi-state ocean plan. The film prominently features Rhode Island and is an inspiring story of citizens coming together to promote healthier economies and healthier seas across New England.

"Ocean Frontiers II" is the second of an award-winning film series produced by Green Fire Productions.  After the film there will be a Q & A discussion with the filmmaker and ocean experts. The event is free and open to the public.


"The people of New England impressed us with the passionate effort that has gone into ocean planning in both Massachusetts and Rhode Island," said Karen Meyer, Green Fire Productions executive director and producer of "Ocean Frontiers II. "This work is an ideal example to share with New England and the rest of the country as ocean planning across the region gets underway."

"Ocean Frontiers II" highlights the historic and emerging ocean uses of New England waters and introduces viewers to people working on the Northeast regional ocean planning initiative. In a region steeped in old maritime tradition, we see a modern wave of big ships, energy industries and a changing climate now testing the limits of an already crowded sea. But in a pioneering trial of far-sighted planning--pushed by blueprints for offshore wind energy--old residents and new are coming together to keep their ocean and livelihoods alive.

A spotlight on Rhode Island reveals how collaborative planning reduces conflicts over ocean resources and puts us on a new path of ocean stewardship. Fishermen, coastal planners, Native American tribal leaders, environmental advocates, scientists and wind energy executives are featured in the film.
The premiere of "Ocean Frontiers II" is presented by Eastern Connecticut State University, The Department of Environmental Earth Science, The College of Arts and Sciences and Green Fire Productions.

To screen the "Ocean Frontiers II" film trailer visit www.ocean-frontiers.org/trailer.  Press images are at www.ocean-frontiers.org/press. Visit www.facebook.com/OceanFrontiers or twitter@Ocean_Frontiers.   

Bernard Lafayette Says "Use Your Rights, or Lose Them!"

Written by Akaya McElveen

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Willimantic, Conn. - Bernard Lafayette Jr., a prominent figure in the Civil Rights Movement, spoke on "Reaching Beyond Your Grasp" on Oct. 9 in the Student Center Theatre at Eastern Connecticut State University. His presentation was part of Eastern's University Hour Series.

More than 200 Eastern students, faculty and staff  heard Lafayette say he was "glad" and "shocked" that he is still alive today, in response to a question asked by a student. Lafayette's life has been threatened on many occasions, including a night when white men came to his house to kill him.

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       More than 200 Eastern students, faculty and staff heard Lafayette describe how resolute the Freedom Riders were while facing terrifying mobs.

Being the target of many death threats, Lafayette had expected his life to have ended already. In fact, he said he that he and his peers, realizing the dangerous journey they were about to begin, created a will before taking part in the Freedom Riders, who were African American and white college students. "No one can take your life if you've already given it," said Lafayette.  He said the Freedom Rides of the 1960s provided the momentum for the Civil Rights Movement, and provided an in-depth, personal look at what life was like for the Freedom Riders.

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Left to right, Stacey Close, Eastern's associate vice president for equity and diversity; Prudence Allen, former administrative assistant to the late Coretta Scott King; Lafayette, Sociology Professors Dennis Canterbury and James Russell pose for a photograph.

Lafayette played a riveting clip from a documentary on the Freedom Rides, which showed scenes of white mobs as they burned and bombed the Freedom Riders' buses and beat them with crow bars, baseball bats and any other weapon they could pick up. Law enforcement and city officials had made a deal; the mob of people was given 15 minutes to do whatever it wanted to the Freedom Riders and they would not get punished for it. Once the 15 minutes were up, Lafayette said the officers announced, "Alright, you've had your fun," and told the mob, "Not one soul will ever be arrested." 

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        Lafayette shakes hands with Akaya McElveen'14, an English major from Waterbury.

There was a moment in the film when a black woman went to a police officer to explain that her husband was being attacked, only to be knocked to the ground by that same officer.

Lafayette said media exposure of the mob violence and city officials' sanction of it played a leading role raising public awareness. News of the mob and police brutality was heard around the world, with America's European allies making it clear to President Kennedy that they were embarrassed by the violence. 

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       Lafayette, left, with former vice president for equity and diversity at  Eastern,and administrative assistants Carmen Diaz and Kathy Escobar.

The speaker also said there is a misconception that the Freedom Rides were about integrating the buses: "The demonstrations were really about bus stations and the right to be treated equally in them." Lafayette also talked about the importance of community engagement, saying that all colleges and universities should be involved in the community. "You've got to bring young people together and organize them. If you don't use your rights, you will lose your rights." As an example, he said students could initiate a voter registration drive by hosting a public birthday party for eighteen-year-olds, where the cost of admission would be showing their voter registration cards.

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          Lafayette with Hope Fitz, professor of philosophy and a scholar on nonviolence.

Lafayette said that he is genuinely interested in what the next generation will contribute to the Civil Rights Movement. "Maybe the movement never really stopped; it's continuous." He said young people should never surrender to violence and injustice. "If you do, the psychological wounds will run deep and may never end."  He encouraged the audience to keep the late Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s dream alive, quoting the late Civil Rights leader, "We must live together as sisters and brothers or die separately as fools."

Lafayette ended his presentation by entertaining the audience with a country song about the struggle of poor white Americans.

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