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December 2013 Archives

"Displaced" Exhibit at Eastern

Written by Akaya McElveen

 

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Willimantic, Conn. - Working in collaboration with the No-Freeze Shelter in Willimantic, students in Professor Gail Gelburd's Museum and Exhibitions class at Eastern Connecticut State University are curating the museum exhibit, "Displaced: Perspectives from Within." The exhibition runs until Jan. 30, 2014, in the Student Art Gallery in Shafer Hall, Room 114.

The exhibition includes art created by Eastern students and young students from other towns; its main focus is work created by guests of the No-Freeze Shelter in Willimantic. The students in the class met with homeless men and women at the shelter and gave them cameras and art supplies. This gave the guests an opportunity to share their perceptions of being homeless and their life in Willimantic. The exhibition is accompanied by information about homelessness in America.

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Students in the course devised the theme and conducted the research. They were divided into museum departments and curated the works, condition reported, catalogued and labeled the images, prepared accompanying educational programming, promoted the exhibition, managed the budget, and then designed the exhibition, the flyers, didactics and labels. They worked as a team to carefully install the exhibition and open it up for public viewing.  For a video on the process the students used, visit www.youtube.com/watch?v=K2_hwaar5Wo&feature=youtu.be.

College Goal Sunday

Written by AKaya McElveen

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Willimantic, Conn. - Eastern Connecticut State University has been chosen as one of 14 sites to host College Goal Sunday from 1:30 to 4:30 p.m. on Jan. 26, 2014. Students and their parents will receive one-on-one expert advice in learning about financial aid and planning for college. The event takes place in Webb 410, on Eastern's Willimantic campus.
 
Students and their families will be able to talk with financial aid counselors and college staff in person to become familiar with college entrance requirements; learn about planning for college; and obtain on-site assistance in filling out financial aid applications. In addition to receiving assistance with their Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), participants will receive general information about state and federal financial aid programs.
   
For students who are the first ones in their families to attend college, the process of applying for college can seem complicated, especially finding financial resources and applying for financial aid. Participating in College Goal Sunday gives students and their families a jump start on the pathway to college by learning about preparing for college and financial aid in a welcoming setting.  Participants can get assistance in completing the FAFSA online. Most grants and scholarships require a completed FAFSA form, which does not obligate applicants to attend college, but is required for most sources of financial aid.       
College Goal Sunday is funded and sponsored by the Lumina Foundation for Education, the CT Association of Professional Financial Aid Administrators (CAPFAA) and the CT Association for Educational Opportunity Programs (CAEOP).  
For more information, contact Neville Brown at brownn@easternct.edu or (860) 465-4428.  For a list of all participating institutions and to find out what to bring to the event, visit www.collegegoalsundayct.org.

CLIP Hosts Free Training for Law Enforcement Officers

Written by Akaya McElveen

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Willimantic, Conn. - The Community Life Improvement Project (CLIP), a collaborative between Eastern Connecticut State University and the Windham community to prevent student alcohol abuse, hosted a free training conducted by the Connecticut State Police and the Northeast Communities Against Substance Abuse (NECASA) in the Paul E. Johnson Sr. Community Conference Room in the J. Eugene Smith Library on Dec. 5. The training focused on new trends in alcohol and drug use related to college students and youth, and was made possible by the CLIP grant. The training was led by Connecticut State Police Sergeant Christopher Bartolotta.

Departments and agencies represented at the training were: CCSU Police, Cheshire Police, Colchester Police, Coventry Police, Mansfield Resident Troopers, Dept. of Consumer Protection, ECSU Police, Fairfield Police, Greenwich Police, Groton Town Police, Manchester Police, Middletown Police, Milford Police, Mitchell College, Newtown Police, Plainfield Police, Putnam Police, Quinnipiac University, SCSU, State Environmental Conservation Police, University of Hartford, WCSU Police & Westport Police.

 Coalition members of CLIP include Eastern faculty members, staff and students as well as local officers, liquor license holders and residents. Together, these members help curb underage and high-risk student drinking.
 Highlighted in the training was the importance of preventing and identifying home labs for illicit drugs. Bartolotta introduced the law enforcement officers to home labs such as mushroom labs, LSD labs, urine labs and indoor marijuana grows. The training concentrated on ways to identify such labs. Bartolotta also examined the occurrence of cross contamination when handling certain illicit drugs.

The training also provided the law enforcement agencies in attendance an overview of The Drug Endangered Children Program, which is set to promoted throughout the country in August 2014. The mission of the program is to break the cycle of abuse and neglect by empowering practitioners who work to transform the lives of children and families living in drug environments. The program began through the efforts of two women. Sue Webber Brown, a District Attorney Investigator in California, recognized the connection between child abuse cases and illicit drugs. "Sometimes it takes a tragedy to see that something needs to be done," stated Bartolotta in referencing Kathey James, who was sentenced to life in prison after the drug lab in her mobile home caught fire and exploded, killing her three small children. The Drug and Endangered Child comprises of representatives from district attorney offices, children's services and law enforcement.

Eastern's English Department Presents English Night

Written by Akaya McElveen

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Willimantic, Conn. - Eastern Connecticut State University's English Department presented English Night in the Betty R. Tipton Room on Dec. 5. The night included the Constance Campo Scholarship ceremony, the announcement of the spring 2013 first-year writing award winners, the Sigma Tau Delta induction Ceremony and senior seminar presentations. English Department Chair Lisa Fraustino hosted the event.


The evening began with the presentation of the English Major Constance Campo Scholarship. The scholarship was established in memory of Constance Campo who was a longtime member of the English Department staff. The scholarship is awarded to a non-traditional student who demonstrates excellence in their studies, and who shows sensitivity to gender issues as Campo did. The scholarship was awarded to Lauren C. Thomas. Fraustino highlighted Thomas's efforts in supporting many students on campus as well as her volunteer time outside of Eastern. Thomas decided that she wanted to pursue a career in teaching inmates in prison and began to tutor three times a week at the Brooklyn Correctional Institution, where she had been visiting for the last six semesters. Thomas's next step is to graduate in the spring of 2014 and attend graduate school at the University of New Haven to receive her master's degree. Thomas states that she feels "incredibly honored and grateful" to have received the scholarship.

English Night 3.JPG Next was the announcement of the first-year writing awards that are given to students enrolled in the first-year writing courses whose writing demonstrates innovation, creativity, splendid research or is uniquely articulated. The awards were given to Madeline Cahill for her personal writing: "I wish my father was unreasonably wealthy so I could waste his money and go to art school to become a writer" and Sarah Dube for her research writing: "Bottled Water: The Cost of Convenience."

 Following the awards was the Sigma Tau Delta induction, which was led by chapter President Emily Story and Vice President Anna Sobanski. Inductees included Elizabeth Allen, Brooke Baldwin, Alexis Ballirano, Mathew Bossi, Jacob Carpenter, Brandon Choquette, Amy Cordner, Sara DeConti, Rene Drouin, Meaghan Eales, Mae Ehrnfelt, Helene Fjeldstad, Molly Gosselin, Chelsea Griffin, Michelle Hoetjes, Vanessa Jones, Jessica Link, Lauren Madison, Chelsea McNamara, Bryan Mitchell, Ashley Parker, Sean Richmond, Alexander Rogan, Meena Roy, Jessica Salkeld, Megan Sargent, Mathew Savona, Kathryn Shpak, Renae St. John, Alexis Thoma, Jessica Wainman, Ashley Westman and Alyssa Zebrowski.

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The event concluded with student presentations from Associate Professor Daniel Donaghy's senior seminar "The Harlem Renaissance," and Associate Professor Stephan Ferruci's senior seminar "The Rhetoric of the Hollywood Film." Three of Donaghy's students presented: Alexandra Karamesinis presented her paper on "Representations of Women Forsaking Motherhood in Harlem Renaissance Literature and Culture";Katie Levis presented "'No Great Poet has ever been afraid of being himself': Using Nella Larsen's Passing to Examine the Double Door of Segregation and the Importance of Voice in the Harlem Renaissance"; and Sean Richmond presented "Two Doors and A Closet: Lesbian Homosexual Coding and Literary Passing in the Harlem Renaissance."
 

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 Three of Professor Ferruci's students presented:  Caitlin Breen presented her paper "We Work with What We've Got: Subversion, Convention and Women's Sexuality in The Cabin in the Woods"; Molly Gosselin presented "'It'll Put Hair on Your Chest': The Appearance of Bipolar Masculinities in Fantasy Films from the 1980s to the 2000s"; and Eliza Kirchoff presented "From Connery to Craig: The Shifting Portrayal of Gender in the James Bond Franchise."
 Following the senior seminar presentations was a Q&A session between the audience and the presenters.

Two from Eastern Receives Best Buddies Award

Written by Akaya McElveen
Willimantic, Conn. - Eastern Connecticut State University student Katharine Ferrone and Charles Wynn, assistant chair of the Physical Sciences Department each have received a Best Buddies of Connecticut (BBCT) award for the month of November. 

Ferrone received the College Chapter President of the Month BBCT Award for November. Ferrone is a junior majoring in social work. She serves as the Eastern BBCT chapter president and has been a contributing member of the organization for a substantial amount of time, though she exhibited exceptional skills and commitment in November.

Ferrone has improved Best Buddies' weekly chapter meetings by adding an educational component. She finds guest speakers, articles and videos about the disability rights movement and social inclusion to present to the chapter. She also has committed herself to help organize the BBCT state event, "Beats for Buds." She is also actively involved in helping with the annual Windham Special Olympics Swim Meet held at Windham High School, where she and her Best Buddies participants arrive at the school once a week with "unrivaled enthusiasm" and "genuine commitment" to assist the athletes. "Their time both in and out of the pool," said Adrianne Levine, head coach for the Windham Special Olympics swim team and Eastern alumna. "She has helped our athletes to develop relationships, strengthen their conversation skills and boost their confidence." Ferrone have demonstrated superb dedication to the organization, and plans to continue her efforts next semester. Aside from organizing Beats for Buds, she and her fellow Best Buddies participants plan to host "Spread the Word to End the Word."  The week-long event is an initiative to eliminate the derogatory use of the word "retard." They also plan to host a BBCT Dance-a-thon to help raise money for the state's programs.

Wynn received the Best Buddies Advisor of the Month Award for November. He is the assistant chair of the Physical Sciences Department and professor of chemistry. Wynn became the Best Buddies faculty advisor in September 2013. In a few short months, his contributions to the organization have helped improve the overall quality of the program. He attends weekly chapter meetings and assists Ferrone in finding and presenting educational material to present to the chapter members. He was also instrumental in recruiting more than 20 new buddies for the Eastern chapter in less than a month. "When Katharine asked me to become the club's faculty advisor, I readily agreed," said Wynn. "I've been really impressed by the enthusiasm of the club's members. They are an inspiration to all of us." In addition to his role as faculty advisor for the chapter, Wynn is also a member of many local organizations. For more than a decade, he has served as the chairman of the Special Olympics Invitational Swim Meet committee, which Eastern faculty members and students have supported through countless hours of volunteer work.

            Levine states, "It is people like Dr. Wynn and Katharine who are making the world a better place not only for people with developmental disabilities but by caring for them also!"

Best Buddies is a nonprofit organization dedicated to establishing a global volunteer movement that creates opportunities for one-to-one friendships for people with intellectual disabilities. Founded in 1989 by Anthony Kennedy Shriver, Best Buddies is a vibrant, international organization that has grown to almost 1,500 middle school, high school and college chapters worldwide. As a result of their involvement with Best Buddies, people with intellectual disabilities secure rewarding jobs, live on their own, become inspirational leaders and make lifelong friendships.

Nanette Tummers Authors Stress Management Book

Written by Akaya McElveen

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Willimantic, Conn. - Nanette Tummers, professor of health and physical education at Eastern Connecticut State University, has authored a new book titled "Stress Management: A Wellness Approach."  The book, which is drawn from leading research and best practices from experts in the field of positive psychology, presents practical tools for managing stress in six dimensions: physical, emotional, intellectual, social, spiritual and environmental. In addition, Tummers' book, "Teaching Stress Management: Activities for Children and Young Adults," published in 2011, was recently translated into Chinese. Tummers has authored four books since 2009, including "Preparing Children and Teens for Healthy, Balanced Living" (2009) and "Teaching Stress Management to Children and Young Adults" (2011).

Tummers presents stress management from a holistic viewpoint in "Stress Management: A Wellness Approach." She considers not only the symptoms of stress but also challenges readers to look at all life circumstances including: physical, emotional, intellectual, social, financial, cultural and spiritual areas. "Stress Management" draws heavily from leading research and the best practices from experts in the field. The book includes resources for further exploration of issues in stress management.

"Stress Management helps us manage stress in today's fast-paced, ever-changing climate: social, culture, politics, economics, technology and media," says Tummers. "It explores key issues of stress and stress management and offers evidence-based research and practical tools for coping with changes and stress in healthy and positive ways."

Tummers has developed and taught traditional and online stress management courses at the university level since 2005. She has taught stress management courses to other populations as well, including high-risk populations, cancer patients and athletes.

Tummers also trains educators in providing stress management activities for K-12 students.  She remains active in conducting research in positive psychology, peer mentoring and stress management and has presented on these topics at the national conferences.

Ready to Climb

Written by Akaya McElveen

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Willimantic, Conn. - Eastern Connecticut State University's Child and Family Development Resource Center (CFDRC) recently introduced two climbing walls for its preschool children; the wall are documented in the short film, "Ready to Climb: Bringing the Climbing Walls to the CFDRC."

"Ready to Climb" was produced by Eastern communication students Sarah Pierce, James Nixon, Dylan King and Attah Agyemang in their Documentary Production class taught by Denise Mathews, professor of communication. Students gained hands-on experience in directing, field shooting, conducting interviews, editing and other production skills. The video will be used to highlight to prospective families and students some of the experiences available to children at the CFDRC.

The indoor and outdoor climbing walls serve to support children's cognitive, social-emotional, creative and physical development, and provide critical experiential learning opportunities for Eastern students who hope to work with young children in their careers. Niloufar Rezai, director of the CFDRC and Darren Robert, professor of Health and Physical Education, detail the benefits of the addition of the climbing walls, citing risk-taking and peer motivation as a few. For instance, children in the center use the climbing walls to improve their hand-eye coordination, said Rezai.

Health and Physical Education students Teresa Rozycki, Mattie Brett and Josh Tamosaitis appear in the video as they work to support the children. Claudia Ahearn, CFDRC lead teacher, also appears in the video.  
The climbing walls were made possible through the support of the ECSU Foundation.

Eastern SUOAF Donates to WAIM During the Holidays

Written by Dwight Bachman

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Health Services Director Robert Jennette, a new member of the board of directors at the Windham Area Interfaith Ministries (WAIM), thanks everyone in the Eastern family for their exceptional spirit of giving at the SUOAF holiday party on Dec. 18. SUOAF members generously donated $460 which, when matched by the SUOAF chapter, meant that WAIM was the recipient of nearly $1,000. "That is truly remarkable from one relatively small gathering," said  Jennette.  "Speaking for WAIM Director Victoria Nimirowski and the WAIM board, if I may, we are extremely grateful that you were so willing to share your good fortune with those less well off."

Eastern Hosts "Let There Be Light: The Black Swans of Ellen Carey"

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Eastern Connecticut State University will be presenting the one-person exhibition, "Let There Be Light: The Black Swans of Ellen Carey," from Jan. 9 through Feb. 20, 2014, in the Akus Gallery. An opening reception will take place on Jan. 23 from 4:30- 6:30 p.m. 

Author Nassim Nicholas Taleb describes "black swans" as major, exceptional, unpredictable events or artistic achievements conceived as extreme outliers. This exhibition is about creating images with light and light only in unprecedented ways to give us the "Black Swans of Ellen Carey."

"Black Swan" references Carey's discovery of the "Pull" in 1996, a technique that creates a conical loop known as a parabola and a new form introduced to photography as a different kind of document, pre-dating Carey's large format Polaroid 20 x 24 camera work begun in 1983 with her "Self-Portrait" series. Carey owns one of five Polaroid 20 x 24 cameras in existence. 

This lens-based artist works within the full complement of light in her twin parallel practices "Photography Degree Zero" (in Polaroid) and "Struck by Light" (in Photogram). By not using traditional photographic tools such as a camera or a darkroom, Carey often eliminates the image as "picture sign" found in portrait, landscape or still life photographs. In Carey's world, there is no document of a person, place or thing -- only records of light. Her artistic intention is to capture light's first traces.

Carey presents her newest series as "Dings & Shadows," innovative forms carrying emotive feeling that combine her longstanding interest in the history of the shadow in art and photography with her photographic color theory referential palette and color printing expertise. In addition, the exhibition at Eastern features other unique artworks in Polaroid and Photogram from 1999 to 2013, in color and black and white. 

In his book "The Edge of Vision: The Rise of Abstraction in Photography," critic and curator Lyle Rexer says, "Ellen Carey is among this country's most committed experimental photographers."

One of Carey's "Dings & Shadows" color photograms was first seen in the current group exhibition "A Democracy of Images: Photographs from the Smithsonian American Art Museum" in Washington, DC, which received a stellar review in the Washington Post. Merry Foresta, the exhibition curator and founding director of SAAM's photography department, selected Carey's work from more than 7,000 pieces in the SAAM collection.

Carey's work has been the subject of 50 one-person exhibitions and has been included in hundreds of group exhibitions. She has been rewarded with many different grants and awards and also has two documentary videos ("Pulls" and "Mourning Wall").

The Akus Gallery is located in Shafer Hall at Eastern Connecticut State University, 83 Windham Street, Willimantic, CT 06226. Gallery hours are: Tuesday & Wednesday 11 a.m.-5 p.m.; Thursday 1-7 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday 2-5 p.m.; and closed Monday. Call the gallery at (860) 465-4659 or (860) 465-4647 or visit www.easternct.edu/akusgallery. All Akus

Gallery events are free and open to the public. For more information, contact Gallery Director Roxanne Deojay at (860) 465-4647 or email deojayr@easternct.edu.


CAPTION:
Ellen Carey Pulls with Mixed and Off-Set Pods, 2010
top • Polaroid 20 X 24 color positive prints • YRGB • 80"H x 22"W (80"H x 88"W overall unframed)
bottom • Polaroid 20 X 24 color negatives prints • GBRY • 80"H x 22"W each (80"H x 88"W overall unframed); Collection of the artist. Courtesy of Jayne H. Baum Gallery New York, NY
 
Pulls with Mixed and Off-Set Pods records a different document through chemistry and color.  Organic and fluid in form and line, with patterns reminiscent of wood, moiré or photographic "Newton rings," Carey's inventive, emphatic palette offers a range from bright to subtle. Dark, irregular shapes float through the vertical pulls and a horizontal line declares a break with or without, exposure or light, and color or non-color.

close3.jpgStacey Close, interim associate vice president for equity and diversity at Eastern Connecticut State University, has been named one of the 100 most influential African Americans in Connecticut by the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP). The Connecticut NAACP will hold a press conference at the Omni Hotel in New Haven, at noon on Dec. 21 to recognize the honorees. Derrick Johnson, Mississippi NAACP state conference president, will be the keynote speaker at the event.

"We are very proud of Dr. Close for receiving this honor," said Eastern President Elsa Núñez. "Stacey is a noted scholar in the field of African Studies and was one of our most popular professors during his time teaching history on our campus. As the associate vice president for equity and diversity, he is now providing leadership in Eastern's efforts to maintain our reputation as an inclusive, multi-cultural campus."

A native of Georgia, Close has worked in higher education for more than 20 years. A professor of history, Close received his Ph.D. and M.A. from Ohio State University and a B.A. from Albany State College in Georgia. He has taught courses on African Americans, African History and Southern History. In addition, he has presented at such conferences as the Southern Conference on African American Studies, Association for the Study of Afro-American Life and History, and the Professional and Organizational Development Network.

"Dr. Close is an integral part of the Easter Connecticut State University team and we congratulate him on being one of the NAACP's most influential black leaders in Connecticut," said Gregory Gray, president of the Board of Regents for Higher Education. "We applaud Dr. Close for his commitment to higher education and ensuring that Connecticut's students achieve excellence."

On Eastern's campus, Close has served as chairperson for the Department of History, Political Science, Philosophy and Geography; director of the Center for Educational Excellence; and NCAA Faculty Athletic Representative. He has served on such committees as the Promotion and Tenure Committee, AAUP-Minority Recruitment and Retention Committee and Athletics Advisory Committee.

Close's students have been accepted to graduate and professional schools such as Loyola University in Chicago; SUNY-Albany; University of Massachusetts-Amherst; Ohio State University; Boston University; and Quinnipiac Law School. A believer in mentoring and supporting students outside the classroom, he has served as the advisor for student clubs such as Eastern's Nubian Society and West Indian Society. Over the years, Close has also worked with Men Achieving Leadership and Excellence (MALES).

Close has served as a co-conference and forum organizer for the New York African Studies Association, Connecticut African American Summit and the Dr. John Hope Franklin Symposium at Trinity College. He has published with journals and presses such as the Griot, Journal of Negro History, Garland Publishing, Connecticut Explored and Guilford Press.

Close is a contributing editor for African Americans in Connecticut Explored, which will be published in January 2014. In addition, he frequently lectures and presents on the Black Hartford freedom struggle. In 2011-12 Close received the prestigious honor of being an American Council on Education Fellow. Some of  his other honors include Eastern Connecticut State University's Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Distinguished Service Award; Student Club Advisor of the Year; Eastern's Faculty Teaching Award; Who's Who Among American Teachers; and the Hartford Courant Magazine's 12 Hot Professors Award.

"I am touched and honored to receive this recognition with these very prestigious people," said Close. "It is thanks to Eastern, my colleagues, faculty members and staff."

 

Written by Akaya McElveen

 

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The Child and Family Development Resource Center (CFDRC), which serves children ages 18 months to 5 years, recently unveiled two climbing walls; one indoors and one outdoors.  The climbing walls will be used to carry out the CFDRC's mission to foster children's cognitive, social-emotional, creative, and physical development.  The climbing walls are expected to help preschoolers build confidence and gain a sense of accomplishment, socially and emotionally by having them work collaboratively and cooperatively.

Physically, the children will be able to develop upper body strength; increase eye-hand coordination; and develop a better sense of how to move their bodies in a space. Cognitively, the wall is expected to develop spatial awareness; allow for literacy/numeracy development through the use of magnetic letters and shapes; and expand children's oral language. Finally, the climbing wall will help children move their bodies in expressive ways fostering pretend and imaginative play.

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The CFDRC is also using this opportunity to provide experiential opportunities for Eastern students.  Under the guidance of Health and Physical Education Professor Darren Roberts, students in physical education will develop and implement lesson plans surrounding the climbing walls, affording valuable experiences in teaching, as well as individualizing based on children's needs. In addition, Communication Professor Denise Matthews is supervising students in the production of a documentary video featuring the climbing walls from their inception to their use with children and staff.

CLIP Hosts Training for Law Enforcement Officers

Written by Akaya McElveen
Willimantic, Conn. - The Community Life Improvement Project (CLIP), a collaborative between Eastern Connecticut State University and the Windham community to prevent student alcohol abuse, hosted a free training conducted by the Connecticut State Police and the Northeast Communities Against Substance Abuse (NECASA) in the Paul E. Johnson Sr. Community Conference Room in the J. Eugene Smith Library on Dec. 5. The training focused on new trends in alcohol and drug use related to college students and youth, and was made possible by the CLIP grant. The training was led by Connecticut State Police Sergeant Christopher Bartolotta.

Departments and agencies represented at the training were: CCSU Police, Cheshire Police, Colchester Police, Coventry Police, Mansfield Resident Troopers, Dept. of Consumer Protection, ECSU Police, Fairfield Police, Greenwich Police, Groton Town Police, Manchester Police, Middletown Police, Milford Police, Mitchell College, Newtown Police, Plainfield Police, Putnam Police, Quinnipiac University, SCSU, State Environmental Conservation Police, University of Hartford, WCSU Police & Westport Police.

Coalition members of CLIP include Eastern faculty members, staff and students as well as local officers, liquor license holders and residents. Together, these members help curb underage and high-risk student drinking.

Highlighted in the training was the importance of preventing and identifying home labs for illicit drugs. Bartolotta introduced the law enforcement officers to home labs such as mushroom labs, LSD labs, urine labs and indoor marijuana grows. The training concentrated on ways to identify such labs. Bartolotta also examined the occurrence of cross contamination when handling certain illicit drugs.

The training also provided the law enforcement agencies in attendance an overview of The Drug Endangered Children Program, which is set to promoted throughout the country in August 2014. The mission of the program is to break the cycle of abuse and neglect by empowering practitioners who work to transform the lives of children and families living in drug environments. The program began through the efforts of two women. Sue Webber Brown, a District Attorney Investigator in California, recognized the connection between child abuse cases and illicit drugs. "Sometimes it takes a tragedy to see that something needs to be done," stated Bartolotta in referencing Kathey James, who was sentenced to life in prison after the drug lab in her mobile home caught fire and exploded, killing her three small children. The Drug and Endangered Child comprises of representatives from district attorney offices, children's services and law enforcement.

Eastern Police to host Open Rec Night

Written by Jordan Sakal

Willimantic, Conn. - Eastern Connecticut State University's Police Department is hosting an event in the Sports Center of Eastern Connecticut State University to give students a fun and relaxing evening as the semester ends. The 18th annual C.O.P.S. Open Rec Night and will take place on Friday, Dec. 6, from 9 p.m. to 2 a.m. It is a non-alcoholic alternative event hosted by the Eastern Police Department in conjunction with the Student Government Association and Eastern's Office of Student Affairs and Housing.

Last year, 750 students attended and went through a mountain of food. This year will have a DJ providing music, a masseuse and the staff from Friendly's Ice Cream dishing up ice cream for the students. There will be tables of board games, arts and crafts tables, basketball and volleyball in the gym, plus racquetball. There will also be plenty of prizes every hour provided by SGA, area businesses and professional sports teams.

Eastern's Penguin Plunge Fundraiser

Written by Christopher J. Herman


Willimantic, Conn. - On Dec. 7 at the edge of Patriots Park on Coventry Lake, Eastern Connecticut State University students will be taking the plunge into chilly waters to raise money for the Special Olympics. Registration for the event starts at 10 a.m. and the plunge starts at noon. Transportation will be provided to students who are participating in the fundraiser. The registration fee for each plunger is $100.

Students or "penguins" can solicit donations from family, friends and local businesses in order to take the plunge.
 
For more information on the fundraiser and volunteer opportunities, contact AmeriCorps VISTA and Event Coordinator Max Goto at (860) 465-5158 or gotom@easternct.edu.

Eastern Seeks Nominations for MLK Award

Written by Danielle Couture

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Willimantic, Conn. - Eastern Connecticut State University is accepting nominations for the 2014 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Distinguished Service Award. Nominees may be a part of the university campus community or from the greater community. Nominations will be accepted through Dec. 17.

The award recognizes members of the campus as well as the community-at-large whose actions demonstrate distinguished service in promoting King's ideals to further the goals of diversity and social equality. Three awards will be given: to a member of the community; a member of the Eastern faculty/staff; and to a member of the Eastern student body.

The awards recognize distinguished service in one or more of three categories: activities that represent a commitment to the goals of an integrated society, including activities beyond one's work obligations; leadership in a program serving the needs of a diverse community, with efforts reflecting an attempt to unify groups and or to increase sensitivity; and planning and implementation of programs to broaden representation of underrepresented groups as students and employees.
 
 The awards will be presented at 6 p.m. on Feb. 19 in the Paul E. Johnson Sr. Community Conference Room of the J. Eugene Smith Library.  For more information regarding the ceremony or to request a nomination form, please call Kemesha Wilmot at (860) 465-4421 or email wilmotk@easternct.edu.

Opera Chamber Singers to Present An Afternoon of Opera

Written by Joran Sakal


Willimantic, Conn. - The Eastern faculty and students will present "Magic, Myth and Mozart" -- opera suitable for children and families "--on Dec. 7, at 2:30 p.m. in the Betty R. Tipton Room in Eastern's Student Center.

The concert features two operatic selections from Mozart -- "The Marriage of Figaro" and "The Magic Flute"; Engelbert Humperdinck's classic "Hansel and Gretel"; and John Rutter's operetta "The Reluctant Dragon," based on the beloved children's story by Kenneth Grahame.

The event is directed by Professors David Belles and. Emily Riggs of the Music Department. Admission is free, but donations of a new or gently used book to be given to deserving children would be appreciated. 

 

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