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April 2013 Archives

Eastern's Cesar Chavez Distinguished Service Award Winners

Written by Gabrielle Little


Cesar Chavez Award Winners.jpgleft to right: Carlos Corona, Julisa de los Santos, Federica Bucco, John Torres and President Elsa Núñez.

Willimantic, CT - Julisa De Los Santos, an Eastern Connecticut State University
residence hall director; John Torres, president of the Bridgeport Caribe Youth Leaders (BCYL)  and Eastern student Federica Bucca '13 received the University's 2013 Cesar Chavez Distinguished Service Awards on April 24 in the Paul E. Johnson Sr. Community Conference Room of the J. Eugene Smith Library.

The Cesar Chavez Distinguished Service Award recognizes individuals who have performed extraordinary service in support of the Latin-American community by either developing or contributing to programs or activities that focus on positive development of minority youth and/or foster minority educational opportunities and advancement.

Keynote speaker John Torres received the award in the community category. Torres has served as the president of BCYL since its beginnings in 2003. He has spearheaded numerous educational programs for the organization, including the Caribe Youth Saturday, an SAT preparation program; the Team Reading Power Program, a reading and writing program; and the Honors Program for students receiving recognition for outstanding academic achievements at their schools. Torres received President Barack Obama's Community Leader Award, for his exemplary services and contribution to the BCYL program. "Chavez helped educate and provide farmers with an environment that wouldn't violate their basic human rights. That's one of the reasons why I do what I do; to help educate our youth the way Cesar Chavez did with the National Farm Workers Association."

De Los Santos received the award in the faculty/staff category. As a hall director, De Los Santos oversees approximately 255 residential students. "I have found Julisa to be committed to enhancing the cultural climate among students, faculty and staff. She provides direct mentorship and advising to countless students, particularly underrepresented students," said Walter Diaz, Eastern's dean of students.  De Los Santos has contributed to the National Association of Student Affairs Administrators in Higher Education (NASPA), the Nation Association of Social Workers (NASW) and Eastern's Organization of Latin American Students (OLAS).

Bucca '13, a sociology major from Hartford, received the award in the student category. Bucca serves as a site coordinator for Journey House at Natchaug Hospital, where she recruits volunteers from Eastern's student body, and creates activities to help increase self-esteem for teenage girls with emotional and behavioral issues. She has dedicated more than 100 hours to work directly with students at Windham Middle School, North Windham Elementary School and Windham High School. Bucca has also showcased her work with the Puentes al Futuro tutoring and mentoring program at the Intercultural Strategies in Civic Engagement Conference.

Eastern to Hold Concert Band Performance

Written by Nana OwusuAgyemang


Willimantic, Conn. - The Performing Arts Department at Eastern Connecticut State University will hold a Concert Band performance on April 24 at 7:30 p.m. in Shafer Auditorium. The public is invited. Admission is free. Shafer Auditorium is in Shafer Hall, located at Valley and High Streets in Willimantic.
Kathryn Niemasik, part-time professor of music, will conduct the ensemble, which will play music she describes as both "exciting and expressive." "Ignition," a powerfully energetic opener composed by conductor Todd Stalter, will open the night. 
  Niemasik's favorite, "El Camino Real," is an expansive composition by Alfred Reed that is both exciting and beautifully tender.  It is based on the music of two Spanish dance forms -- the jota and fandango.  Selections from "Les Miserables"-- featuring some of the best-known songs from the musical, including "At the End of the Day;" "I Dreamed a Dream;" "On My Own" and others -- will also be performed that night.
 
"This is an extremely ambitious selection of music to be performed by the Eastern Concert Band," says Niemasik, and the audience should expect and exciting repertoire.

For more information on the performance, contact Kathryn Niemasik at niemasikk@easternct.edu or (860) 465-5193.

 

 

Senior Art Exhibit at Eastern

Written by Gabrielle Little

Senior Art Exhibit.jpgWillimantic, Conn. CT - Students from Eastern Connecticut State University's Visual Arts Department will showcase their work at the Annual Senior Art Exhibit from May 3-14 at the Julian Akus Gallery, located in Shafer Hall at the corner of Windham and Valley Streets in Willimantic. The opening Visual Arts awards ceremony is from 3-4 p.m. and the exhibition reception is from 4-6 p.m. The gallery will remain open until 6 p.m. The public is invited. Admission is free.

According to Visual Arts professor Gail Gelburd, "The senior project is a capstone that gives students an opportunity to use all of their experiences and creativity to develop their own project or to work together on a real-world experience in design. The exhibit will include large scale paintings, mixed media, work created as multiples, digital projections, package design and work done for the Hole in the Wall Camp."

Akus Gallery hours are 11 a.m.-5 p.m. on Tuesdays and Wednesdays, 1-7 p.m. on Thursdays and 2-5 p.m. on Saturdays and Sundays. The gallery is closed on Mondays and Fridays.

For more information regarding the exhibit, visit www.easternct.edu/akusgallery.

Habitat for Humanity Club Forms Partnership

Written by Danielle Couture


Willimantic, CT - - The Willimantic Lion's Club and students from Eastern Connecticut State University's Habitat for Humanity Club formed a partnership for humanity on April 13 to paint several rooms in the homes of senior citizens who live on Lebanon Avenue in Willimantic.

This is the fourth collaboration between these two local organizations. "It was rewarding for all of us to have the opportunity to work together to brighten up the living space of Willimantic senior citizens," said Charles Wynn, chairman of the Partnership for Humanity Willimantic Lions Club and professor of chemistry at Eastern. "It was also a great opportunity for Willimantic Lions to meet a group of Eastern students who have been making a difference in the community, and for those students to learn about the world's largest and most active service organization."

Lions Club International has 1.35 million members in approximately 45,000 clubs in 207 countries and geographical areas around the world. Since 1917, Lions Clubs have aided the blind and visually impaired and made a strong commitment to community service and serving youth throughout the world.

For information about the Willimantic Lions Club, visit www.willimanticlionsclub.org or www.lionsclub.org or contact Colin Rice, membership director at (860)-456-1111.
 
Habitat for Humanity International is a nonprofit, nondenominational Christian housing ministry. Habitat welcomes all people -- regardless of race, religion, ethnicity, or any other difference -- to build simple, decent, affordable houses for those who lack adequate shelter. Since its founding in 1976, Habitat for Humanity has built more than 300,000 houses, providing shelter for more than 1.5 million people in over 90 countries around the world. For information about the Habitat for Humanity, visit www.habitat.org.

For information about the Eastern chapter, contact Peter Bachiochi, faculty advisor at (860)-465-4551.

Robert K. Wickware Planetarium to Host Spring Star Show

Written by Gabrielle Little

Star Projector color.jpgWillimantic, Conn. - The Robert K. Wickware Planetarium at Eastern Connecticut State University will host a star show titled, "Light Pollution," at 5:30 p.m. on April 29. The public is invited. Admission is free. Russell Sampson, associate professor of physical sciences, will host the show.

During the show, Sampson will present some of the latest highlights from space science and astronomy. A question and answer session will follow.
 
For tickets or free private star shows, contact Zosia Carlquist at (860) 465-4317 or carlquistz@easternct.edu, or Sampson at (860) 465-0188 or sampsonr@easternct.edu.

Eastern Named "Green Campus" for 4th Year in a Row

 

Green Guide 2013 Cover Cropped.jpgEastern Connecticut State University is one of the 322 most environmentally responsible colleges in the United States and Canada, according to The Princeton Review (www.PrincetonReview.com).

 

The education services company released its fourth annual edition of "The Princeton Review's Guide to 322 Green Colleges" on April 16, and chose the schools selected for the guide based on a 50-question survey it conducted in 2012 of hundreds of four-year colleges.  The company analyzed data from the survey about the schools' course offerings, campus infrastructure, activities and career preparation to measure their commitment to the environment and to sustainability. 

The 215-page guide can be downloaded at www.princetonreview.com/green-guide and www.centerforgreenschools.org/greenguide

 

The 322 school profiles in the guide feature essential information for student applicants -- facts and statistics on school demographics, admission and financial aid -- plus write-ups on the schools' sustainability initiatives.  A "Green Facts" sidebar reports on a wide range of topics from the school's use of renewable energy sources, recycling and conservation programs to the availability of environmental studies and career guidance for green jobs. Of the 806 schools that reported Green Rating scores in 2012, the 322 schools chosen for this guide earned scores of 83 or higher. Eastern earned a green rating score of 86.

Thumbnail image for green campus-fuel cell utc.JPG

 

In the guide's profile on Eastern, The Princeton Review highlights Eastern's Climate Action Plan, detailing its commitment to achieving a zero carbon footprint by 2050, citing Eastern's effort to create a campus-wide culture of sustainability through green operational initiatives; green-minded education for first-year students; and its Environmental Earth Science and Sustainability Energy Studies majors. 

Thumbnail image for green campus-science external-1 (2).JPG"We are honored that The Princeton Review and the U.S. Green Building Council recognize Eastern's campus-wide commitment to green education," said Eastern President Elsa Nunez. "Our Green Campus Initiative commits the campus community to lowering energy use, reducing water waste, improving recycling and procurement of environmentally safe materials.  Ten percent of the campus energy consumption is derived from renewable resources, including geothermal, solar power, biofuel and purchased electricity from renewable sources. The campus also boasts four LEED-certified buildings, including a LEED Silver Science Building, featuring daylight harvesting, a gray water system, recycled flooring, native plants and a bio-filter system to reduce rainwater runoff. Eastern's Institute for Sustainable Energy (ISE) addresses energy issues in our region by supporting the development of sound public energy policy, providing K-12 energy education and professional development and solutions to community resource issues."

Robert Franek, senior vice president and publisher of The Princeton Review, said, "We are truly pleased to recommend Eastern along with all of the fine schools in this book to the many students seeking colleges that practice and promote environmentally-responsible choices and practices."

 

Franek noted his company's recent survey findings that indicate significant interest among college applicants in attending "green" colleges. "Among 9,955 college applicants who participated in our 2013 'College Hopes & Worries Survey,' 62 percent said having information about a school's commitment to the environment would influence their decision to apply to or attend the school."  

The Princeton Review created its "Guide to 322 Green Colleges" in partnership with the Center for Green Schools (www.usgbc.org) at the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC)), with generous support from United Technologies Corp. (www.utc.com), founding sponsor of the Center for Green Schools.

 

Rachel Gutter, director of the Center for Green Schools at USGBC, commented, "Selecting a four-year college is a big choice. When we learned that the majority of prospective college students factor a school's commitment to sustainability into their selection criteria, we wanted to ensure we were providing the best information.  We're thrilled to team up with The Princeton Review for the fourth year to offer a guide to help make our future college students' choices a little easier."

Annual Eastern Excellence Expo to be Held on April 24

Written by Dwight Bachman


Willimantic, Conn: -- Eastern Connecticut State University's School of Education/Professional Studies and Graduate Division will hold its 13th Annual Excellence Expo on Wednesday, April 24, 2013, from 2--4 p.m. in the Student Center.  The public is invited. Admission is free.

More than 150 students, supported by 11 faculty mentors, will present research projects and posters showcasing the five departments in the School of Education/Professional Studies and Graduate Division.

Presentations include communication, marketing and advertising campaigns;  projects from the economics senior seminar; and a gallery photography exhibit of framed prints and color slides, just to name a few. Poster research includes topics on communication law and ethics; sport and leisure management; early childhood education; technologies, societies and communities; and systems analysis.

For more information on the Excellence Expo, contact Pat Kucharski at (860) 465-5264 or email her at kucharski@easternct.edu.

Eastern Hosts Workshop for Parents and Their Children

Written by Danielle Couture

WorkshopPhoto2 (2).jpgWillimantic, CT - - Eastern's School of Continuing Education will host "Exploring Abstract Wood Sculpture" for local parents and children, in the Child and Family Development Resource Center on May 7. Eastern Visual Arts Professor Claudia Widdiss will teach the course, which will be held in the Child and Family Development Resource Center from 5:30-7:30 p.m. During the class, families will work together with their children to make fun creations out of wood and other materials.

On April 10, Eastern hosted the workshop "Supporting Your Child's Literacy Skills Through Daily Routines" in the Child and Family Development Resource Center, to inform busy parents how to support their children's development by engaging them in meaningful discussions daily. Children were watched as parents met separately with Theresa Surprenant, instructor of education at Eastern. In a discussion setting, parents learned that even with busy schedules, daily routines such as car rides, cooking dinner or getting dressed in the morning can be taken advantage of to help children learn, by sparking conversation about what they are seeing and doing.

 

WorkshopPhoto1.jpg "The workshop gave us a lot of really practical ideas to do with our kids," says Joanna Auriantal, a Willimantic resident who attended the workshop with her husband and three children. "Some of our favorites were talking to our kids about our childhood, practicing rhyming and making word puzzles to learn spelling. My husband is a teacher and I work in education, so we try to incorporate ideas from work into our family. You always try to do what's best for your kids, but it's nice to come to something like this to give you more ideas and learn from others."
After the discussion, parents were reunited with their children to practice the conversational skills they learned while the children played. Parents also completed an assessment about what they learned and received a badge of completion for the course.
 
Persons interested in the "Exploring Abstract Wood Sculpture" should contact Indira Petoskey, assistant dean of the School of Continuing Education, to register. She can be reached at (860) 465-5066 or petoskeyi@easternct.edu. The fee for the workshop is $10 per adult. Dinner will be served from 5:30-6 p.m.

 

 

Carlotta Walls LaNier to Speak at Commencement

Written by Danielle Couture

Commencement Speaker Carlotta Walls-LaNier .jpgWillimantic, CT - - Carlotta Walls LaNier, youngest member of the "Little Rock Nine," a group of African American students who desegregated Central High School in Little Rock, AR, in 1957, will deliver the keynote address at Eastern Connecticut State University's 123rd Commencement at 6 p.m. on May 14 at the XL Center in Hartford. During the ceremony, 1,256 undergraduates and 41 graduate students will receive their diplomas.

"We are honored and pleased to have Ms. LaNier as this year's commencement speaker," said Eastern President Elsa Núñez. "Her courage as a young high school student more than 50 years ago in helping to break the barrier of segregation in Little Rock, Arkansas, resonated across this nation, with the Little Rock Nine serving as a catalyst for major social change in America."

LaNier made history at age 14 when she enrolled at Central High School as a sophomore. She was inspired by the desire for a quality education and by Rosa Parks, whose refusal to give up her bus seat to a white passenger sparked the 1955 Montgomery, AL, bus boycott. On the first day she attended Central High School, an angry mob surrounded the school to prevent African American students from entering the building.

After two weeks of protests and violence, President Dwight Eisenhower sent U.S. Army troops to Little Rock. The troops protected the Little Rock Nine by escorting them to class for a year. The desegregation of Central High School by the Little Rock Nine spurred similar changes in the American educational system.
LaNier was the first African American female to graduate from Central High School. She continued her education at Colorado State College (now the University of Northern Colorado), graduating in 1968.

After college, LaNier began working at the YWCA as a program administrator for teens. In 1977, she founded LaNier and Company, a real estate brokerage company, where she has worked as a professional real estate broker for more than 30 years.
She is an active supporter in her community, serving on the board of trustees for the University of Northern Colorado and Iliff School of Theology.  LaNier also serves as president of the Little Rock Nine Foundation, and is a member of the Denver Chapter of The Links, Incorporated, and the Johnson Legacy, Inc. board of directors.

LaNier has received numerous awards and recognitions, including the prestigious Spingarn Medal from the NAACP in 1958, and the Congressional Gold Medal, the nation's highest civilian award, which was bestowed upon the Little Rock Nine in 1999 by President Bill Clinton. She is also the author of "A Mighty Long Way: My Journey to Justice of Little Rock Central High School."

At the ceremony, LaNier will also be awarded an Honorary Doctorate of Humane Letters, Honoris Causa.

People Helping People Club Joins Pantene Beautiful Lengths

Written by Danielle Couture

HairDonation.jpgWillimantic, CT - - Eastern's People Helping People (PHP) student club, in collaboration with Pantene Beautiful Lengths, is holding a hair donation event from 2-4 p.m. on April 29 in the Betty R. Tipton Room in the Student Center. All donated hair will be made into wigs for cancer patients. The public is invited.

For those interested in donating, hair must be a minimum of eight inches; free of dyes, bleaches or chemicals; and no more than five percent gray. Hairstylists will be available to style hair after the cut is made.

The goal of PHP is to donate enough ponytails to create 10 wigs. To sign up or for more information, contact PHP at peoplehelpingpeople@my.easternct.edu; Kim Silcox in the Center for Community Engagement at silcoxk@easternct.edu; or Nicole Gaona at gaonan@my.easternct.edu.

Students Attend Spuyten Duyvil Mathematics Conference

Written by Danielle Couture

Willimantic, CT - - Four Eastern Connecticut State University students who are members of  the Eastern Math Club, along with Peter Johnson, associate professor of mathematics, attended the eighth annual Spuyten Duyvil Undergraduate Mathematics Conference at Manhattan College in New York City on April 6.

At the conference, students presented and discussed mathematical topics with other undergraduate students in a professional setting.Kyle Courtemanche, a senior from North Providence, RI, presented his honors thesis, "An Application of Markov Chains to Cross and Circle Games," which is a mathematical model on the game "Sorry." This was the first time an Eastern student has presented at the conference.

 "Presenting my thesis at the conference was an excellent opportunity for me to share my research with the math community," says Courtemanche. "My presentation was very well received and I am proud of this accomplishment, as it was the culmination of two years of work. I feel it has helped prepare me for a career in mathematics."

 Students who attended the trip included Ricky Magner, James Chadic, Joe Nolet and Courtemanche.The Spuyten Duyvil Undergraduate Mathematics Conference is a one-day conference that meets at a different college in the United States once a year. The conference features presentations by undergraduate students and faculty in mathematics and related disciplines.

Eastern Joins National Employer-Educator Compact

Written by Dwight Bachman

Nunez 2013 Headshot.jpgWillimantic, CT. -- On April 10, Eastern Connecticut State University announced its participation in a new national initiative called the LEAP Employer-Educator Compact. 

Eastern President Elsa Núñez has signed the compact, which was developed by the Association of American Colleges and Universities (AAC&U) and by employers working with AAC&U.  AAC&U is a national organization of colleges and universities of which Eastern is a long-standing member.  President Núñez also is a member of a special presidential leadership group within AAC&U called the LEAP Presidents Trust.  Presidents Trust members and employers who work with them are the initial signatories to this ongoing national initiative to ensure that today's students are well prepared for economic, civic and global challenges.

Participating campuses and employers will work together through 2014 to showcase employer support for the aims and outcomes of a broad liberal education and to show how higher education is helping students connect college learning with their roles as professionals, citizens and members of the global community.

As part of the compact initiative, Eastern is partnering with Webster Bank, the Mohegan Tribal Council, Savings Institute Bank and Trust, Blum-Shapiro, Farmington Bank and the Willimantic Waste Company to underscore the economic value of liberal education and to provide students with more hands-on learning opportunities to connect their campus learning with real-world contexts and problems.

At an April 10 compact forum in Washington, D.C., featuring remarks by U.S. Under Secretary of Education Martha Kanter, AAC&U launched the new LEAP Employer-Educator Compact to make high quality college learning a shared national priority.  More than 250 college presidents, business and nonprofit leaders have signed on to the LEAP Employer-Educator Compact.  They have pledged to work together to ensure that all college students--including those attending two-year and four-year, public and private institutions--have access to a high quality liberal education that prepares them successfully for work, life and citizenship.   

"Too many students believe that the key to economic success is completion of a major whose title seems to promise a job," said AAC&U president Carol Geary Schneider.  "What the compact and the research on employer priorities show is that, whatever the choice of major,  employers say that career success will require broad liberal learning, strong 21st century skills, and 'real-world' experience and savvy. We want to make sure students and their families hear this message from employers themselves."

"I am excited to be a part of this new national effort bringing employers and educators together to ensure that all our students understand what it takes to succeed in today's workplace and to partner on ways we can provide students more opportunities to apply their learning in real-world settings," said Núñez. "We are particularly pleased to partner in this initiative with our good friends at Webster Bank, Blum-Shapiro, the Mohegan Tribal Council and other University partners."

On April 10, AAC&U also released findings of a national survey that revealed that 74 percent of business and nonprofit leaders say they would recommend a 21st century liberal education to a young person in order to prepare for long-term professional success in today's global economy.  The findings from this national survey also reveal that:

·         Nearly all employers surveyed (93 percent) say, "a demonstrated capacity to think critically, communicate clearly, and solve complex problems is more important than a candidate's undergraduate major."

·         Even more (95 percent) say they prioritize hiring college graduates with skills that will help them contribute to innovation in the workplace.

·         About 95 percent of those surveyed also say it is important that those they hire demonstrate ethical judgment and integrity; intercultural skills; and the capacity for continued new learning.

·         More than 75 percent of those surveyed say they want more emphasis on critical thinking, complex problem-solving, written and oral communication, and applied knowledge in real-world settings.

·         80 percent of employers agree that, regardless of major, every college student should acquire broad knowledge in the liberal arts and sciences.

 

Members of the Presidents Trust include leaders of institutions representing every sector of higher education--liberal arts colleges, community colleges, comprehensive state universities and research universities. Business and nonprofit leaders signing the compact include individuals from many sectors of the economy including: finance, engineering, manufacturing, healthcare, human services, insurance, education, media, retail, real estate and energy.  For a full list of LEAP Presidents' Trust members and employers signing the compact, see: www.aacu.org/leap/presidentstrust/compact. For a report of the complete findings from the 2013 survey of business and non-profit leaders, see: www.aacu.org/leap/public_opinion_research.cfm.

 

Eastern Wins "Power of Change" Award for Energy Effort

Written by Dwight Bachman


power of change.jpg

(left to right) Mally Cox-Chapman, philanthropy advisor, Common Sense Fund; Nancy Tinker, director of facilities management and planning, Eastern Connecticut State University; Sabina Shelby, trustee, Hampshire Foundation; and Stewart Hudson, president, Tremaine Foundation, at the Power of Change ceremony at the State Capitol.

Willimantic, CT -- Eastern Connecticut State University's J. Eugene Smith Library Lighting Control System Upgrade was one of seven Connecticut energy efficiency projects acknowledged on April 9 in the first annual Power of Change Award program sponsored by the Common Sense Fund, the Hampshire Foundation, and the Emily Hall Tremaine Foundation. Eastern earned First Honors in the Power of Change Fast Track Award category.

"These seven Power of Change Award winners demonstrate the innovative ways Connecticut is meeting aggressive energy efficiency goals and are a promising example of how our state is taking an active role in driving a clean energy economy forward," said Stewart Hudson of the Emily Hall Tremaine Foundation, one of the three organizations funding and supporting the initiative. "We created the Power of Change Award as an opportunity to provide recognition and also encourage even more state and municipal leaders to make an important investment in their future. We believe it's important to celebrate success where it occurs--in this case good government practices that protect human health, reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and in the process help the Connecticut economy and save taxpayer dollars."

Eastern_Connecticut_State_University library].jpgState agencies, facility managers and stakeholders entered projects in three award categories: the Innovation Award, designed to recognize new and effective ideas and approaches to achieve energy reduction through efficiency; the Fast Track Award, recognizing the agencies that got out front by aiming for higher levels of efficiency; and Most Energy-Efficient Building Awards for buildings associated with Connecticut-owned educational institutions and Court Houses.  Eastern earned First Honors in the Fast Track Award category. William Leahy, executive director of operations for Eastern's Institute for Sustainable Energy, was a member of the 15-member regional committee of energy and conservation experts who judged the awards.

 In fall 2011, Eastern received a state grant funded by Governor Dannel Malloy's Lead by Example state building energy efficiency program to install Encelium, an energy conservation system, in the J. Eugene Smith Library. Work on the project began in February 2012. Workers attached sensors to all of the lights in the building and also regulated the heating, ventilation and cooling system as well. Each floor of the four-story building was divided into multiple zones, which were wired in a way that the zone can be separately controlled for lighting. The Encelium system is not just a standard motion detection stem; it also can compensate for the amount of outside daylight in the room.

Eastern Connecticut State University is the state's public liberal arts university and serves approximately 5,400 students each year on its Willimantic campus and satellite locations. It is the policy of Eastern Connecticut State University to ensure equal access to its events.

 

Bonnie Red Basket to present at Eastern

Written by Gabrielle Little

 

Willimantic, Conn. - Bonnie Red Basket will present at Eastern Connecticut State University's University Hour Series from 3-4 p.m. on April 10 in the Student Center Theatre. The public is invited. Admission is free.

Red Basket's presentation will discuss how to overcome trauma and restore one's sense of self, emotionally and spiritually, through restoration, healing and hope.
Red Basket has hosted workshops at the Pine Grove Spiritualist Church in Niantic, CT, and will soon be opening a wellness center.

Eastern to Host Research and Exhibition Conference

Written by Gabrielle Little

research and exhibition-cedrone.JPGWillimantic, Conn. - Eastern Connecticut State University's School of Arts and Sciences will hold its 13th annual Student Research and Exhibition Conference from 8:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. on April 13 in the Science Building. The public is invited. Admission is free.

More than 100 students, supported by more than 50 faculty mentors, will present projects and presentations showcasing nine departments in the School of Arts and Sciences.

From 9:30-11:50 a.m., students will present oral presentations in the Science Building. From 11:50 a.m.-12:30 p.m., poster presentations will be on display in the Science Building Lobby and visual arts exhibits can be viewed in Room 223 of the Student Center. The exhibits will include digital art, prints, paintings, drawings, sculptures and books created by Eastern students.

The projects range from presentations such as "Artificial Structures in Marine Environments: Do Materials Influence the Success of Invasive Species?" by Biology major Sheona Douglas '14 of Bloomfield, to "CIRC DU TAROT: The symbolism of the Major Arcana Through Circus Illustrations" by Communication major Lindsey Ancel '13 of Milford.

Eastern's Jazz Ensemble will close out the ceremony.

 

Eastern Honors Alumni and Donors

Written by Ed Osborn


Donors Kenton, Alfiero, Nunez Watts.jpg

President Elsa Nùñez, secnd from right, with Presidential Leadership Award Winners, left to right, Stephen Kenton, Anna Alfiero and Steve Watts, right.

Willimantic, Conn: -- Eastern Connecticut State University recognized four people who have made exceptional contributions to Eastern, their local communities, the state of Connecticut and beyond at the President's Leadership Awards Luncheon on April 4.

Anna (Stankewich) Alfiero '62 received the Alumni Association's Distinguished Alumni Award, which recognizes outstanding leadership or professional success by Eastern graduates. Alfiero had an exemplary 35-year career in the Waterford Public School system and was named to the inaugural class of inductees into the National Teachers Hall of Fame in 1992 by President Bill Clinton.

Alfiero also serves as the organizer of the Willimantic State Teachers College Class of '62. Last year she chaired the committee to celebrate their 50th Reunion, and she is leading the effort to create a permanent, endowed scholarship that will honor the legacy of her classmates. "There were 60 in our graduating class," she said, "and we were the first class of schoolteachers who were required to take graduate credits and get our master's degree.  We were supported and encouraged by our teachers and fellow students, and we were committed to leaving the world a better place than we had found it. I cherish those times."
 
The Hermann Beckert Friends of the University Award was presented to Professor Emeritus Stephen Kenton. Following a teaching career at Eastern of 38 years, during which time he became known for creating an ever-expanding network of math and computer science alumni, Kenton helped start an endowed scholarship in his honor. Through his enthusiasm and hard work, the scholarship has raised $51,000 to support math and computer science students. Kenton described three different students, including his own daughter, who fell in love with Eastern and enrolled or transferred here as a result. "Our students really love it here," he said. "I feel privileged to have been part of this University."

Receiving the ECSU Foundation's Distinguished Donor Award was Steve Watts. In 2010, Watts established the LeClaire B. Watts Endowed Scholarship in memory of his wife, Lee, who taught Spanish at Eastern for many years before she passed away in 2009. "By creating this scholarship, I know that Lee would be happy that she can continue to serve Eastern and its students years after she is gone," he said. Watts also serves on the Board of Directors for the ECSU Foundation.

Eastern President Elsa Nùñez thanked the recipients for their professional, civic and philanthropic accomplishments, and applauded the donors present for their commitment to assisting students in paying for their educations.

 "I am here today especially to acknowledge the hundreds of Eastern students who, without your support, might not be walking our halls, sitting in our classrooms, and burning the midnight oil in the library to achieve their goals as scholars and budding professionals," she said. "We had nearly 3,000 donors this past year -- including a record-high 1,850 alumni donors, which is a positive validation of what we are doing here at Eastern."
 
Also receiving recognition was Sandy Roth, who is the recipient of the Alumni Association's Distinguished Service Award. In addition to receiving her master's degree at Eastern, Roth created a scholarship to support history majors in memory of her late husband, History Professor David Roth. She also serves on the ECSU Foundation Board as secretary. Roth was unable to attend the April 4 event and will receive her award at Eastern Celebrates in May.

Eastern to Hold Faculty Solo Piano Recital

Written by Nana OwusuAgyemang


Sarah Masterson (2).jpg Willimantic, Conn. - The Performing Arts Department of Eastern Connecticut State University will hold a solo piano recital on April 13. at 3-5 p.m. in Shafer Auditorium, located in Shafer Hall. Performing will be music lecturer Sarah Masterson, playing pieces by Mozart, Schubert, Roy Harris and Liszt.
 
Masterson recently completed her doctoral degree in performance at the University of Connecticut (UConn), where she performed as part of the UConn Wind Ensemble, the UConn Chamber Music Festival and the William Benton Museum of Art's RecitalsPlus series.  As winner of the UConn graduate division's 2009 concerto competition, Masterson performed Grieg's Piano Concerto in A minor with the UConn orchestra.  In March 2010, her piano trio performed as part of the prestigious Jorgensen Center for the Performing Arts Classics Series.

As the winner of the 2001 Young Artist competition, Masterson performed with the Evansville Philharmonic Orchestra.  At DePauw University, she performed as soloist with the DePauw Symphony Orchestra; accompanied a variety of recitals and musical theater productions; and performed as part of DePauw's annual Music of the 21st Century festival.  She has also participated in master classes with several artists, including Vladimir Viardo and Jon Nakamatsu.
 
 For more information about the recital, please contact the Performing Arts Department on (860) 465-5325.

Eastern to Hold Third Brown Bag Concert

Written by Nana OwusuAgyemang

 Willimantic, Conn. - The Performing Arts Department of Eastern Connecticut State University will hold the third and final Brown Bag Concert of the academic year on April 12 at noon in Shafer Hall Auditorium. The public is invited. Admission is free. Shafer Hall is located at Valley and High Streets in Willimantic.

 

The Brown Bag Concert series is an opportunity for students who are studying applied music to demonstrate their skills on a regular basis in a relaxed environment. This opportunity is outside of the normal setting of large concerts that occur regularly on campus, and serves as a way for individuals to perform solo material.

 

The concerts are an hour in length and are held on the second Friday of every month. They are performed in a friendly, inviting setting, and the audience is encouraged to bring lunch and enjoy the music.
 

Eastern Presents Take Back the Night

Christopher J. Herman


 Willimantic, Conn. - Eastern Connecticut State University's Women's Center is hosting its annual "Take Back the Night" program from April 9-11. "Take Back the Night" is a campus-wide protest movement against sexual assault, sexual abuse and domestic violence, offering a space for speaking and healing for those who have been affected by these crimes.

The first event, "Walk a Mile in Her Shoes," will be held at 11 a.m. on April 9, beginning in front of the Student Center. Through a nationwide campaign to promote open communication about sexual violence, "Walk a Mile in Her Shoes" asks men to walk one mile in women's shoes in order to bring them into the conversation, and join women in their efforts to make the world a safer place.

On April 10 at 3 p.m., the Women's Center will present "A Time to Restore" in the Women's Center. The discussion will focus on overcoming trauma and restoring the self, emotionally and spiritually.

Also on April 10, the Women's Center will present "Mad Men, Monsters and Misogynists: Depictions of Masculinity and Sexual Violence," at 3 p.m. in the Student Center Theatre. The presentation will discuss gender violence prevention, bystander intervention, diversity and sexual health education.
 
The final event of "Take Back the Night" will be held on April 11 at 7 p.m. in the Student Center Theatre, where students will discuss social issues such as rape, sexual abuse and domestic violence.

In conjunction with Sexual Assault Awareness Month, "Take Back the Night" seeks to end all forms of sexual violence, while creating safe communities and healthy relationships through awareness, activism and advocacy. An estimated one in every three women are victims of interpersonal violence and/or abuse. Since 1975, "Take Back the Night" has grown into an international movement, joining universities, communities and organizations together to take back the voices that sexual violence has claimed. 

For more information on the event, contact Starsheemar Byrum at (860) 465-4313 or byrums@easternct.edu.

Eastern Honors Recipients of Annual Ella T. Grasso Award

Written by Gabrielle Little


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Winners of Eastern Connecticut State University's 2013 Ella T. Grasso Distinguished Service Award, left to right, Starsheemar Byrum, coordinator of the Womens Center,; Ann Higginbotham, professor and chair of the History Department; Ruth Washington,  former professor of the University of Connecticut's Department of Molecular and Cell Biology; Eastern student Isaiah Roby; and Eastern President Elsa Núñez.

Willimantic, Conn. - Eastern Connecticut State University hosted the annual Ella T. Grasso Distinguished Service Award on March 20 at 6 p.m. in the Paul E. Johnson Sr. Community Conference Room of the J. Eugene Smith Library. Senior Isaiah Roby; Ann Higginbotham, professor and chair of the History Department; and Ruth Washington, former professor of the University of Connecticut's Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, were named recipients of the award. The award recognizes leaders who have made contributions towards advancing women's rights and issues of gender equality in memory of former Connecticut Governor Ella T. Grasso.

We are an institution built on values and among those are the values of inclusion, empowerment, and integrity," said Eastern President Elsa Núñez. "I believe that protecting women's rights and recognizing those who are taking the lead in working for gender equality is fundamental to upholding the values of our institution, so, tonight is not simply a celebration; it is an affirmation,." "Governor Grasso once said, "It is not enough to profess faith in the democratic process; we must do something about it." Our three awardees tonight already understand what it means to step up to the plate."

Roby '13, a senior with a double major in psychology and women and gender studies, is carrying a 3.71 GPA. He serves as the president of student organization Pride Alliance, and is a student representative to Eastern's Diversity and Social Justice Council. Roby also serves as
volunteer for St Paul's Church, helping church members clean up Willimantic, plant trees and raise money for the Covenant Soup Kitchen. Roby interns in the Women's Center, which promotes the advancement of women's rights and gender equity. "My mother taught me that you can be raised in a nontraditional single family home and still do great things for the community. I want to be a strong role model for those in the LGBTQ community, and help create a space for them on campus and in the world."

Higginbotham, is the Professor chair of the History Department. She serves on the Committee for the Status of Women of the American Association of University Professors (AAUP), and is a member of the Connecticut/Rhode Island Conference of Women's Studies Directors/Faculty; and a senator for the University Senate. She received Eastern's Distinguished Professor Award in 2004, for her teaching and mentoring at Eastern, and has led the History Department in developing several courses on family and women's history and family in Western Society. "My life was like one of those sitcoms that my students watch at night on TV land that displayed a typical household in the 1950's. From there, I began to see the problems that women faced. So I've been able to teach, write, and advocate for womens history, only to realize that some of those problems still exists and need to change"

Washington, is a founding member of Know Your Value: Women of Color Alliance, a new not for profit organization, created to examine the wealth gap between women of color and other groups of women. Washington also started Forward Education and Consulting LLC, which provides comprehensive services specializing in diversity in higher education especially in technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). "I want to be able to help women understand the history of the wealth gap. That is the goal of the "Know Your Value: Women of Color Alliance," to change the statistics for future generations."

Eastern to Host Show for Space Day

Written by Danielle Couture

Planetarium Star Projector .jpg

The $150,000 Spitz System 512 star projector in Eastern's Planetarium, a machine that displays images of celestial matters onto the dome of a planetarium. This device can also project 2,350 stars, which is almost twice as many as the old projector.

 

Willimantic, CT - - The Robert K. Wickware Planetarium at Eastern Connecticut State University will host a special show at 5:30 p.m. on April 8, in celebration of National Space Day. Russell Sampson, associate professor of physical sciences, will host the show. The public is invited. Admission is free.

The show will review the visible night sky, describe recent space discoveries and detail the Connecticut space industry. There will be giveaways and NASA items displayed.
 
The show is sponsored by the Connecticut Space Grant Consortium as part of Space Weekend 2013. To reserve your seat, contact Zosia Carlquist at (860) 465-4317 or carlquistz@easternct.edu. For additional information about Space Weekend go to http://ctspacegrant.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/Space-Weekend-2013-Flyer.pdf or http://ctspacegrant.org. You can also contact Sampson at (860) 465-0188 or sampsonr@easternct.edu.

Napolitano Selects Eastern to Help with Emergency Prep Plans

Written by Ed Osborn


aerial of south residential villageDSC_1651.JPGWillimantic, Conn. - U.S. Secretary of Homeland Security Janet Napolitano today announced the selection of Eastern Connecticut State University to participate in the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Campus Resilience Pilot Program (CR Pilot).  Eastern will join six other colleges and universities nationwide to help develop and pilot an emergency preparedness and resilience planning program, facilitated by community engagement, local stakeholders, campus leadership and students.
  
"Eastern will serve as a valuable partner in our efforts to help colleges and universities prepare for, respond to and recover from crisis and emergency situations," said Secretary Napolitano. "Through its work with DHS, Eastern will help us further develop best practices, resources and tools needed to assist campus communities nationwide in their resilience and emergency planning processes."

"We are very pleased that our University was chosen by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security as one of only seven colleges and universities to be part of this national pilot program," said Eastern President Elsa Núñez. "Emergency preparation is a major part of our commitment to campus safety. We are honored to help develop best practices for improving campus preparedness on a national scale."

The CR Pilot will emphasize the importance of the Federal Emergency Management Agency's "Whole Community" approach to planning and resilience efforts, and will highlight the needs of various student populations.  The program will bring together school officials, students and members of the local community to discuss new, innovative approaches to campus resilience and emergency planning, and will build upon Eastern's existing efforts in this area.

"Eastern Connecticut State University is committed to being prepared for any emergency or disaster," said Jeffrey Garewski, director of public safety. "Key university personnel have received Incident Command System/National Incident Management System training and additional training will continue as required to keep the university compliant with federal regulations. Originally developed from our Influenza Pandemic Continuity of Operations Plan, Eastern's Incident Management Team oversees the University's preparation to effectively sustain critical campus services in the event of a pandemic or other major emergency." 
Eastern also employs an "Eastern Alert" emergency messaging system which uses several methods of communicating emergency notifications to the University community, including public address capabilities.

  The University's information technology infrastructure also allows network access from remote computers so personnel can access their desktop computers from home or another location.  Personnel providing critical services have priority for accessing the University's network so they can continue business operations if campus access is not possible.

Eastern has also established a Campus Community Emergency Response Team made up of interested faculty and staff members, who have received training and are equipped with the necessary tools to assist first responders at campus incidents. 
"The key to effective implementation of our emergency plan is communication between key departments and providing accurate information to our constituents in a timely manner," said Garewski. "We are committed to the safety of our campus community and maintaining the continuity of our operations in the event of a crisis situation."

For more information, visit www.dhs.gov.

Eastern Presents "Once On This Island"

Written by Nana OwusuAgyemang

once on an island logo OOTI Logo (2).jpg Willimantic, Conn. - The Eastern Connecticut State University Theatre program will present the mystical musical "Once On This Island" on April18-21 and April 23-24 in the Harry Hope Theatre in Shafer Hall.
 
The musical will be presented at 7:30 p.m. on April18-20 and April 23-24, with a 4 p.m. matinée on April 21. The public is invited. Admission is $5 for students and groups of 10 or more; $10 for Eastern faculty, staff and senior citizens; and $12 for the general public. Shafer Hall is located at the corner of High and Valley Streets in Willimantic.

 

 

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              Amanda Conkey and Daniel Fernandez performing in "Once on this Island"

Directed by lecturer Alycia Bright-Holland and supervised by Theatre Professor David Pellegrini, "Once On This Island" is a story of hope, struggle and rebirth, a musical with lyrics by Lynn Ahrens, and music by Stephen Flaherty. It is a lyrical love story of two island people brought together and torn apart by fortune and fate.
 
Based on the novel "My Love, My Love," by Rosa Guy, "Once On This Island" was first produced in 1990 at Playwrights Horizons in Manhattan; it then moved to Broadway's Booth Theatre for a run of nearly 500 performances. It has been a popular musical since, and has had its most recent professional revival at the Paper Mill Playhouse, directed by Tony Award nominee Thomas Kail. New York Times columnist Frank Rich wrote, a "Caribbean fairy tale told in rousing song and dance, this show is a joyous marriage of the slick and the folkloric, of the hard-nosed sophistication of Broadway musical theater and the indigenous culture of a tropical isle."

 Incorporating unique West African dance forms, director/choreographer Bright-Holland works with co-musical directors Jan Jungden and Mark Makipuro to bring this timeless tale of the prince and the pauper to life through the pulsating beat of the Calypso-based score. Set designer Kristen Morgan's immersive island atmosphere is complimented by the artwork of Art Professor Imna Arroyo, who dresses the set. Connecticut-based costume designer Anya Sokolovskaya designed the costumes for the production, and Eastern's Music and Voice Professor Emily Riggs contributes as vocal coach, assisting in bringing a powerful Patois voice to the play.

Tickets may be reserved by calling the Harry Hope Theatre box office at (860) 465-5123.
For more information, please visit www.easternct.edu/performingarts.

U.S. Secretary of Homeland Security Janet Napolitano today announced the selection of Eastern Connecticut State University to participate in the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Campus Resilience Pilot Program (CR Pilot).  Eastern will join six other colleges and universities nationwide to help develop and pilot an emergency preparedness and resilience planning program, facilitated by community engagement, local stakeholders, campus leadership and students.   

"Eastern will serve as a valuable partner in our efforts to help colleges and universities prepare for, respond to and recover from crisis and emergency situations," said Secretary Napolitano. "Through its work with DHS, Eastern will help us further develop best practices, resources and tools needed to assist campus communities nationwide in their resilience and emergency planning processes."

"We are very pleased that our University was chosen by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security as one of only seven colleges and universities to be part of this national pilot program," said Eastern President Elsa Núñez. "Emergency preparation is a major part of our commitment to campus safety. We are honored to help develop best practices for improving campus preparedness on a national scale."

The CR Pilot will emphasize the importance of the Federal Emergency Management Agency's "Whole Community" approach to planning and resilience efforts, and will highlight the needs of various student populations.  The program will bring together school officials, students and members of the local community to discuss new, innovative approaches to campus resilience and emergency planning, and will build upon Eastern's existing efforts in this area.

"Eastern Connecticut State University is committed to being prepared for any emergency or disaster," said Jeffrey Garewski, director of public safety. "Key university personnel have received Incident Command System/National Incident Management System training and additional training will continue as required to keep the university compliant with federal regulations. Originally developed from our Influenza Pandemic Continuity of Operations Plan, Eastern's Incident Management Team oversees the University's preparation to effectively sustain critical campus services in the event of a pandemic or other major emergency." 

Eastern also employs an "Eastern Alert" emergency messaging system which uses several methods of communicating emergency notifications to the University community, including public address capabilities.

The University's information technology infrastructure also allows network access from remote computers so personnel can access their desktop computers from home or another location.  Personnel providing critical services have priority for accessing the University's network so they can continue business operations if campus access is not possible.

Eastern has also established a Campus Community Emergency Response Team made up of interested faculty and staff members, who have received training and are equipped with the necessary tools to assist first responders at campus incidents. 

"The key to effective implementation of our emergency plan is communication between key departments and providing accurate information to our constituents in a timely manner," said Garewski. "We are committed to the safety of our campus community and maintaining the continuity of our operations in the event of a crisis situation."

For more information, visit www.dhs.gov.

Eastern Honors Winners of MLK Distinguished Service Award

Written by Gabrielle Little


MLK Awards 2013.jpg

Winners of Eastern Connecticut State University's 2013 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Distinguished Service Award, left to right, are author and poet Billie Jean Young,; Eastern student Soely Barros; Connecticut Supreme Court Justice Lubbie Harper Jr.; Indira Petoskey, assistant dean of the School Continuing Education;  and Eastern President Elsa Núñez.


Willimantic, CT - Eastern Connecticut State University presented the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Distinguished Service Award to senior Soely Barros, Indira Petoskey, assistant dean of the School Continuing Education and the Honorable Connecticut Supreme Court Justice Lubbie Harper Jr. at a reception on Feb. 27 in the J. Eugene Smith Library. The awards recognize members of the campus community and community-at-large whose actions demonstrate distinguished service in promoting the ideals of King, and to further the goals of diversity and social equality.
 
Actor and poet Billie Jean Young delivered the keynote address. She encouraged the audience to love and demonstrate love through unselfish commitment. "Love has the capacity to transform humanity," she said. "Some of the greatest accomplishments in the world have come about through love. Love can conquer hate and bring abomination to its knees." She described a member of civil rights and social activist, people who demonstrated "love with its working clothes on." Young ended her presentation with her self-written signature poem, "Fear Not to Fall," the title of her latest book.

"Tonight's award recipients help us highlight Dr. King's legacy, one that is an enduring message of love, justice and unity; a dream not yet fully realized," said Eastern President Elsa Núñez, as she acknowledged the recipients for their work in relation to Dr. Martin Luther King's legacy. "King said; 'Injustice anywhere, is a threat to justice everywhere.'"

Barros '13, a double major in Spanish and social work carrying a 4.0 GPA in Spanish and a 3.4 GPA in Social Work, serves as the president of the African Club of Eastern and is also a bilingual tutor for Eastern's Dual College Enrollment Program. Barros also works in the Study Abroad Office in the School of Continuing Education, and volunteers as an intern at the North Windham Elementary School, where she mentors 12 elementary schoolchildren. Barros cited Dr. King, "'If you can't fly, run. If you can't run, walk. If you can't walk, crawl, but whatever you do, keep moving.' That's what I've learned from the people I come across in life. Although I am graduating from Eastern, I will be here in spirit."

Petoskey, affectionately known as "Dr. P," is the assistant dean in the School of Continuing Education, where she oversees international students, global field courses, study abroad, non-credit professional programs and the national student exchange. Her passion for education has been reflected throughout her 16 years in higher education serving as an administrator and faculty member. She mentors and tutors high school and college students, participates in the Hartford Immigrant Advisory Group and serves her community through clothing and food drives and visiting the sick in hospitals and at home. She played an important role in the foundational oversight of the Dual Enrollment Initiative Program, and continues to be a powerful advocate and ally of minority students. Petoskey said she chooses to love unconditionally in spite of her circumstances. "I overcome worries by trusting God, and I overcome hurts inflicted by others through loving people." She quoted Martin Luther King Jr. saying, "I have decided to stick with love; hate it too great of a burden to bare."

The Honorable Supreme Court Justice Lubbie Harper Jr. was nominated to the position of Superior Court Judge in 1997 by Governor John Rowland. On Jan. 5, 2005, Governor M. Jodi Rell nominated Harper to the Appellate Court. On Feb. 23, 2011, Governor Dannel P. Malloy nominated Harper for elevation to the Connecticut Supreme Court.

 "As I reflect on the significance of this award, I am reminded of Dr. King's dream and admiration for our nation. I am reminded that we are still chasing the dream." said Harper. He ended with a quote from Dr. King: "'It is only in the dark that, you can see the stars'" - so, as we continue to search for the stars, we must always keep in mind the works of public service and our obligation to make a difference."

Students Attend Geological Society of America Conference

Written by Danielle Couture

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 Students and faculty gather in front of Mt. Washington at the Conference

Front row (Left to Right), Lindsey Belliveau, Laura Markley, Assistant Professor Meredith Metcalf, Mackenzie Fannon, Rachel Dern. Back row (Left to Right): Drew Hyatt, Christopher Lorentson, Jeff Outland, Assistant Professor Lea Gilbertson, Associate Proffessor Dickson Cunningham, Professor Peter Drzewiecki, Assistant Professor Bryan Oakley, Jonathan Burdacki.

  Willimantic, CT - - Six Eastern Connecticut State University students, and an equal number of faculty, attended the Northeastern Section of the Geological Society of America (NEGSA) Conference in Bretton Woods, NH, from March 18-20 to attend presentations on a wide range of geological topics. Students attending the trip included Christopher Lorentson, Jon Burdacki, Laura Markley, Rachel Dern, Mackenzie Fannon and Lindsey Belliveau.


At the conference, students attended sessions and participated in a follow-up question and answer session. Four faculty members gave oral presentations. Belliveau joined Drew Hyatt, chair of the Environmental Earth Science Department, to speak about meltwater erosion marks in bedrock at Bailey's Ravine in Connecticut.
 
"The Geological Society of America conference allowed me to present my research; learn exciting new things; and network with professionals in the field who have given me invaluable advice," says Belliveau. "NEGSA has allowed me to feel prepared for the exciting future that is ahead of me."

 

Students also attended a graduate student fair where they spoke with representatives from a variety of out-of-state universities about programs in earth science. "I intend to go to graduate school after completing my degree at Eastern, so listening to what professionals had to say about the specifics of their programs taught me some more about what to expect from education at the next level," said Lorentson, president of Eastern's Environmental Club.

Established in 1888, the GSA provides access to elements that are essential to the professional growth of earth scientists at all levels of expertise and from all sectors: academic, government, business and industry. The Northeastern section of GSA meets once a year.


 

Marilyn Alverio to Speak at Eastern

Written by Gabrielle Little

marilyn alverio image.jpgWillimantic, Conn. - Marilyn Alverio, an urban markets strategist, will present during Eastern Connecticut State University's University Hour Series from 3-4 p.m. on April 3 in the Student Center Theatre. The public is invited. Admission is free.
 
Alverio will speak on what women can do to succeed in leadership roles. She is an expert on developing strategic approaches to marketing and communicating in a multicultural environment.

Alverio serves on the executive committee for the board of directors of the Connecticut Health Foundation, and is most noted for her work as the former national director of ethnic marketing and Latino market manager for Aetna Financial Services; also known as ING.

Akus Gallery to Host "Mother Goddess" Symposium

Written by Gabrielle Little


Willimantic, Conn. - The Akus Gallery at Eastern Connecticut State University will host a symposium for its latest exhibition, "From Motherhood to Mother Goddess: Transcendence from Self to Absolute," from 3-5 p.m. on April 3 in the Shafer Auditorium.

The panel will include Gail Gelburd, professor and chair of the Visual Arts Department; Reynold Kerr, art critic and curator of African Art; Vladimir Merchenkov, professor of aesthetics and theory of Ohio University; Robert Newman, author and academic scholar; and Neeta Omprakash, Nehru-Fulbright Scholar.

According to Gelburd, "The significance of the Mother Goddess is seen not only in the rituals performed in the traditional societies, but it also gives cultural identity. The Mother Goddess, basically, symbolizes either generative or destructive powers." 

For more information about the exhibition, please contact the Akus Gallery at www.easternct.edu/akusgallery or (860) 465-4659.

 

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