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June 2012 Archives

Youth Basketball Camp at Eastern

Written by Christopher Herman

Willimantic, Conn. - Eastern Connecticut State University's Athletic Department will host its annual summer youth basketball camp from 9 a.m.-4 p.m., July 23-Aug. 3. The clinic is designed for girls and boys of all skill levels, ages 5-16. Tuition is $195. All funds support Eastern's basketball program.

The goal of the camp is to provide each camper with the fundamentals of basketball, including shooting, passing, ball handling, rebounding, defense and team play. The camp offers skill development, individual instruction, contests and basketball games. Individual shooting technique and offensive skill development are emphasized. The campers will be separated by age and will play two games daily.
 
Bill Geitner, Eastern's head men's basketball coach, will lead the camp, along with high school and college coaches, including current and former Eastern players.
Campers should bring their own lunch but may purchase snacks and drinks at the camp store.

To register for the camp, interested persons should visit http://www.easternct.edu/athletics/men_basketball/documents/2011Brouchure2.pdf

For more information, contact Bill Geitner at (860) 465-5332 or geitnerw@easternct.edu.

Eastern's Teacher Advanced Placement Workshops

Written by Chris Herman

ap worshop - cowles.JPGWillimantic, Conn. - From July 16-20, Eastern Connecticut State University will host a series of Advanced Placement (AP) summer institutes for Connecticut teachers. More than 140 teachers will participate in the workshops, which will take on Eastern's Willimantic campus. Topics include introductory AP biology, experienced AP biology, AP English language and AP English literature.
 
 The goals of the workshops are to help increase the awareness of AP classes within school systems and provide teachers with methods to enhance their students' knowledge in the areas of math, science and English. The workshops are a collaborative initiative between Eastern, Project Opening Doors (POD) and Project Step2Stem. Project Opening Doors is funded by a grant from the National Math and Science Initiative (NMSI); and Project Step2Stem is funded by the U.S. Department of Education. Both grants work in partnership with EASTCONN, which runs both programs.

ap workshop - Andy Wight and Cathy Peng.JPG
      Studies have shown a steady decline of American students pursuing math and science courses. According to the NMSI website, only 18 percent of 12th-grade students performed at or above the proficiency level in science. Project Opening Doors has helped to raise these figures -- the number of students in AP math and science increased 12 percent in 2009, which is twice the national average and three times the average in the state of Connecticut, according to the POD website. Here in Connecticut, in nine schools participating in the Project Open Doors program, the pass rate among students taking AP math, science and English exams rose to 38 percent compared to the state average of 13 percent.
 
      For more information, contact Victoria L. Lorenzen at (860) 465-0172 or lorenzenv@easternct.edu.

Youth Learn Fundamentals at Eastern's Soccer Camp

Written by Christopher Herman

sports soccer camp.JPGWillimantic, Conn. - Eastern Connecticut State University's Athletic Department will host its annual summer youth soccer camp from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., July 9-13. The clinic is for girls and boys ages 5-14 of all skill levels. Tuition is $200. All funds will support Eastern's soccer program.
 
The goal of the camp is to provide each camper with technical skill training in dribbling, passing, receiving, shooting, and heading. Individual goal-keeper training will also be available. Campers will play small-sided games involving fewer players on a smaller-sized field, which allows each camper more individual playing time and more exposure to the soccer ball.

Greg DeVito, Eastern's head men's soccer coach, and Adam Phaiah, assistant men's soccer coach, will lead the camp, along with current and former college soccer players. DeVito was the 2007 Little East Conference (LEC) Coach of the Year and Phaiah was the 2007 Thomac Kruseski Young Coach of the Year.

 "The camp is an excellent way for young players to learn the fundamentals of soccer," said DeVito. "It provides structured curriculum to promote learning and a positive, fun camp experience."

To register for the camp, interested persons should visit www.ecsuyouthsoccercamp.com. For more information, contact Greg DeVito at (860) 465-4334 or devitog@easternct.edu.

Players Learn Basketball Fundamentals at Eastern Camp

Written by Chris Herman


Willimantic, Conn. - Eastern Connecticut State University's Athletic Department will host its annual summer youth basketball camp from 9 a.m.-4 p.m., July 23-Aug. 3. The clinic is designed for girls and boys of all skill levels, ages 5-16. Tuition is $195. All funds support Eastern's basketball program.

The goal of the camp is to provide each camper with the fundamentals of basketball, including shooting, passing, ball handling, rebounding, defense and team play. The camp offers skill development, individual instruction, contests and basketball games. Individual shooting technique and offensive skill development are emphasized. The campers will be separated by age and will play two games daily.

Bill Geitner, Eastern's head men's basketball coach, will lead the camp, along with high school and college coaches, including current and former Eastern players.
 
Campers should bring their own lunch but may purchase snacks and drinks at the camp store. To register for the camp, interested persons should visit http://www.easternct.edu/athletics/men_basketball/documents/2011Brouchure2.pdf
For more information, contact Bill Geitner at (860) 465-5332 or geitnerw@easternct.edu.

 

Advanced Placement Courses Enhance Teaching

Written by Chris Herman


Willimantic, Conn. - From July 16-20, Eastern Connecticut State University will host a series of Advanced Placement (AP) summer institutes for Connecticut teachers. More than 140 teachers will participate in the workshops, which will take on Eastern's Willimantic campus. Topics include introductory AP biology, experienced AP biology, AP English language and AP English literature.
 
 The goals of the workshops are to help increase the awareness of AP classes within school systems and provide teachers with methods to enhance their students' knowledge in the areas of math, science and English. The workshops are a collaborative initiative between Eastern, Project Opening Doors (POD) and Project Step2Stem. Project Opening Doors is funded by a grant from the National Math and Science Initiative (NMSI); and Project Step2Stem is funded by the U.S. Department of Education. Both grants work in partnership with EASTCONN, which runs both programs.

Studies have shown a steady decline of American students pursuing math and science courses. According to the NMSI website, only 18 percent of 12th-grade students performed at or above the proficiency level in science. Project Opening Doors has helped to raise these figures -- the number of students in AP math and science increased 12 percent in 2009, which is twice the national average and three times the average in the state of Connecticut, according to the POD website. Here in Connecticut, in nine schools participating in the Project Open Doors program, the pass rate among students taking AP math, science and English exams rose to 38 percent compared to the state average of 13 percent. 

For more information, contact Victoria L. Lorenzen at (860) 465-0172 or lorenzenv@easternct.edu.

 

Soccer Players Learn Fundamentals at Eastern's Soccer Camp

Written by Chris Herman

Willimantic, Conn. - Eastern Connecticut State University's Athletic Department will host its annual summer youth soccer camp from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., July 9-13. The clinic is for girls and boys ages 5-14 of all skill levels. Tuition is $200. All funds will support Eastern's soccer program.  

The goal of the camp is to provide each camper with technical skill training in dribbling, passing, receiving, shooting, and heading. Individual goal-keeper training will also be available. Campers will play small-sided games involving fewer players on a smaller-sized field, which allows each camper more individual playing time and more exposure to the soccer ball.

Greg DeVito, Eastern's head men's soccer coach, and Adam Phaiah, assistant men's soccer coach, will lead the camp, along with current and former college soccer players. DeVito was the 2007 Little East Conference (LEC) Coach of the Year and Phaiah was the 2007 Thomac Kruseski Young Coach of the Year.

 "The camp is an excellent way for young players to learn the fundamentals of soccer," said DeVito. "It provides structured curriculum to promote learning and a positive, fun camp experience."

To register for the camp, interested persons should visit www.ecsuyouthsoccercamp.com. For more information, contact Greg DeVito at (860) 465-4334 or devitog@easternct.edu.

 

Eastern Provides Hands-on Experience for Future Teachers

Written by Christopher Herman

SIFT - Pappalardo.JPGWillimantic, Conn. -- From July 8-27, high school juniors and seniors from  more than 20 Connecticut school districts will participate in the 16th Annual Summer Institute for Future Teachers (SIFT) program at Eastern Connecticut State University.

"Eastern and the Capital Region Education Council (CREC) created the program, which aims to increase the number of students who consider teaching as a career; emphasizes the growing role technology plays in teaching and learning; and expands efforts to recruit teachers from the diverse communities in Connecticut," said David Stoloff, professor of education and director of the University's Center for Educational Excellence.

SIFT 6181.JPG

During the program, students are immersed in coursework and field trips; work with pre-school and elementary schoolchildren; integrate educational theory with practical experience; and study and live within the rich multicultural environment of Connecticut classrooms.

Students in the program prepare and present lesson plans; create positive learning environments that celebrate cultural diversity; give detailed reports defending their choices for classroom layout; maintain journals reflecting on their teaching observations and experiences; and develop websites and electronic portfolios.   Successful participants receive three undergraduate credits for the course titled "Teaching in the 21st Century."


SIFT 6271.JPGStoloff, along with Leah Barbuto, professor of early childhood education, and Terrell Green, teacher at Naubuc School in Glastonbury, will serve as mentors for the students.

For more information about the SIFT program, contact David Stoloff at (860) 465-5501 or stoloffd@easternct.edu.

Eastern Students Help Support Local Pantry

Written by Christopher Herman


food justice 1.jpgWillimantic, Conn. - The Food Justice Committee was formed in fall 2011 by Eastern Connecticut State University's Center for Community Engagement to address issues of food insecurity, poverty and education in the Willimantic community. Eastern student Becky Rushford recently contacted the Connecticut Food Bank (CFB) and asked for mobile food trucks to come to Willimantic to deliver fresh food to low-income families in the area.

Students on the committee have worked to establish a mobile food pantry through the CFB in Willimantic. The committee's goals include increasing donations of fresh and healthy food to local agencies, educating the community on how to prepare and cook healthy food, and developing a weekly after school program on nutrition and gardening.

 

food justice 2.jpgIn collaboration with the CFB, committee members participated in two gleanings at a local apple orchard. Gleanings are defined as picking through a farmer's leftover crop to salvage food for other uses. Members were able to pick 500 lbs. of apples that would have otherwise rotted, and donated them to Catholic Charities, the Salvation Army and the Covenant Soup Kitchen. The committee also seeks to raise awareness on campus through activities such as food audits of Hurley Hall, and raising awareness about food carbon footprints. The committee is a connecting hub for food-related activities occurring on campus through clubs and classes, as well as off-campus activities.  Participating Eastern students included Whitney Allen, Bryan Lehner, Kate Harner, Lauren Greeney, Nicolle Hill, Nicole Brooks, Israel Bonello, Rebekah Rushford, Sabrina Scott, Megan Thomson, Jonathan Yackel and Heather Lepper.

Eastern faculty members teach courses every year that incorporate service into the curriculum. Students in a wide variety of disciplines gain practical experience and provide valuable services to the local community.

Boys State to Educate Students about Government

Written by Christopher Herman

Boys STate QA.JPGWillimantic, Conn.--From June 22-28, more than  200 high school juniors from across the state will converge on the campus of Eastern Connecticut State University to attend the 25th Annual American Legion Boys State.
During Boys State, students will learn how state and municipal governments operate. They set up and run mock town, city and state elections and engage in role-playing where towns are represented. Mayors lobby and representatives and senators will debate and enact legislation.

According to Rochelle Gimenez, dean of the School of Continuing Education, "Boys State is a program that we value since it teaches young men how to become exemplary citizens by educating them about the political process.  High school students attending this program have the opportunity to run for mock office and participate in all aspects of government. Many well-known politicians have attended Boys State in the past and have gone on to public service as adults. We look forward to having Boys State once again on our campus."

Eastern's SOAR Program Prepares Students their First Year

Chris Herman

soar 4- singing in btr.JPGWillimantic, Conn. - Eastern Connecticut State University's Student Orientation, Advising and Registration (SOAR) program, mandatory for all new first-year students, will take place on Eastern's campus June 25-July 13. The program, which is designed to make first-year students aware of the resources available to them, consists of six two-day sessions, during which approximately 155 incoming students per session will attend informational meetings and social events.

The goal of SOAR is to provide opportunities for new students to learn methods of academic and social success at Eastern. SOAR allows incoming students to meet other new students, current student leaders and members of the academic and student affairs staff.  Students will receive academic advisement and then register for the fall semester.

During SOAR, students will stay overnight in Constitution Hall, one of Eastern's freshman residence halls, to give them an opportunity to experience life on campus. Students will also have the opportunity to participate in several group sessions facilitated by student orientation counselors (SOCs), where they will engage with other students socially; have discussions; and be able to ask student leaders questions about their experiences at Eastern. There will also be sessions about living on campus and commuting to Eastern.

Prospective Students Set for Rigorous STEP/CAP Program

Written by Chris Herman

STEP-CAP - get name from nick.JPGWillimantic, Conn. - On June 25, more than 70 students from across the state hoping to enroll in Eastern Connecticut State University in the fall will arrive on campus to begin the 29th year of the Summer Transition at Eastern Program/Contract Admission Program (STEP/CAP). Classes begin June 27.
 
 Through Aug. 3, students from Bridgeport, Hartford, New Haven, New London, Norwich, Waterbury, Willimantic and out-of-state will attend intensive credit-bearing courses in math and writing, as well as rigorous workshops in social sciences, library research methods, public speaking, study skills and critical thinking. Those who are successful will be admitted as freshmen for Eastern's fall semester.

Organized around the theme of "hard work and determination," students will come to campus having read selective readings that communicate the message. Once the students begin classes, they will have additional readings and discussions to participate in that follow the program theme. Successful STEP/CAP students have gone on to become doctors, lawyers, teachers, insurance executives, government officials, personnel managers and much more - remarkable achievements for young people labeled in high school as incapable of college level work.
As part of this preparation for undergraduate life, this year's STEP/CAP students will also focus on John Brown's raid on the federal arsenal in Harper's Ferry, V.A.  In learning about this 1859 incident, students will be asked to read, write and reflect upon what it takes for people to organize and collaborate, simultaneously work together as a group and stand apart as individuals.

"The STEP/CAP program is about asking students to change and begin making changes to their lives," said Student Development Specialist Fredrick Hornung. "We challenge students to start walking in new directions by giving them opportunities to showcase their intelligence and drive through hard work. We have high expectations, knowing that each student is capable of becoming a successful college student."

Successful completion of STEP requires an overall 2.0 grade point average, which then qualifies a student to continue as a freshman at Eastern in the fall semester.

Eastern to Host Laurel Girls State

Written by Chris Herman

girls state - great wide shot.JPGWillimantic, Conn. - From June 27-July 3, Eastern Connecticut State University will host more than 180 high school juniors from around the state who will participate in the Laurel Girls State program.
 
Sponsored by the American Legion Auxiliary, Laurel Girls State prepares young women for careers in government through citizenship and democracy. Program officials will focus on patriotism by involving students in all aspects of government and by enhancing pride in America. Students will elect officials on a local and state level, who will then carry out the duties of their offices. Students will also write bills and enact legislation.
  "We are delighted to host Girls State for the seventh year in a row," said Victoria Lorenzen, program facilitator in the Office Institutional Advancement.

The Girls State program has provided students with hands-on citizenship experience and government participation for more than 65 years. Girls State officials hope the experience will result in lifelong participation in government.

Eastern to Provide Hands-on Experience for Future Teachers

Written by Chris Herman


Willimantic, Conn. -- From July 8-27, high school juniors and seniors from  more than 20 Connecticut school districts will participate in the 16th Annual Summer Institute for Future Teachers (SIFT) program at Eastern Connecticut State University.

"Eastern and the Capital Region Education Council (CREC) created the program, which aims to increase the number of students who consider teaching as a career; emphasizes the growing role technology plays in teaching and learning; and expands efforts to recruit teachers from the diverse communities in Connecticut," said David Stoloff, professor of education and director of the University's Center for Educational Excellence.

During the program, students are immersed in coursework and field trips; work with pre-school and elementary schoolchildren; integrate educational theory with practical experience;and study and live within the rich multicultural environment of Connecticut classrooms.
 
Students in the program prepare and present lesson plans; create positive learning environments that celebrate cultural diversity; give detailed reports defending their choices for classroom layout; maintain journals reflecting on their teaching observations and experiences; and develop websites and electronic portfolios.
   Successful participants receive three undergraduate credits for the course titled "Teaching in the 21st Century."

Stoloff, along with Leah Barbuto, professor of early childhood education, and Terrell Green, teacher at Naubuc School in Glastonbury, will serve as mentors for the students.
For more information about the SIFT program, contact David Stoloff at (860) 465-5501 or stoloffd@easternct.edu.

Laurel Girls State to Promote Citizenship and Democracy

Written by Chris Herman


 Willimantic, Conn. - From June 27-July 3, Eastern Connecticut State University will host more than 180 high school juniors from around the state who will participate in the Laurel Girls State program.

Sponsored by the American Legion Auxiliary, Laurel Girls State prepares young women for careers in government through citizenship and democracy. Program officials will focus on patriotism by involving students in all aspects of government and by enhancing pride in America. Students will elect officials on a local and state level, who will then carry out the duties of their offices. Students will also write bills and enact legislation.

  "We are delighted to host Girls State for the seventh year in a row," said Victoria Lorenzen, program facilitator in the Office Institutional Advancement.

The Girls State program has provided students with hands-on citizenship experience and government participation for more than 65 years. Girls State officials hope the experience will result in lifelong participation in government.

Prospective Eastern Students to Apply Hard Work at STEP/CAP

Written by Chris Herman

Willimantic, Conn. - On June 25, more than 70 students from across the state hoping to enroll in Eastern Connecticut State University in the fall will arrive on campus to begin the 29th year of the Summer Transition at Eastern Program/Contract Admission Program (STEP/CAP). Classes begin June 27.

 Through Aug. 3, students from Bridgeport, Hartford, New Haven, New London, Norwich, Waterbury, Willimantic and out-of-state will attend intensive credit-bearing courses in math and writing, as well as rigorous workshops in social sciences, library research methods, public speaking, study skills and critical thinking. Those who are successful will be admitted as freshmen for Eastern's fall semester.

Organized around the theme of "hard work and determination," students will come to campus having read selective readings that communicate the message. Once the students begin classes, they will have additional readings and discussions to participate in that follow the program theme. Successful STEP/CAP students have gone on to become doctors, lawyers, teachers, insurance executives, government officials, personnel managers and much more - remarkable achievements for young people labeled in high school as incapable of college level work.

As part of this preparation for undergraduate life, this year's STEP/CAP students will also focus on John Brown's raid on the federal arsenal in Harper's Ferry, V.A.  In learning about this 1859 incident, students will be asked to read, write and reflect upon what it takes for people to organize and collaborate, simultaneously work together as a group and stand apart as individuals.

"The STEP/CAP program is about asking students to change and begin making changes to their lives," said Student Development Specialist Fredrick Hornung. "We challenge students to start walking in new directions by giving them opportunities to showcase their intelligence and drive through hard work. We have high expectations, knowing that each student is capable of becoming a successful college student."

Successful completion of STEP requires an overall 2.0 grade point average, which then qualifies a student to continue as a freshman at Eastern in the fall semester.

Boys State to Educate Students about Government

Written by Chris Herman

Willimantic, Conn.--From June 22-28, more than  200 high school juniors from across the state will converge on the campus of Eastern Connecticut State University to attend the 25th Annual American Legion Boys State.

During Boys State, students will learn how state and municipal governments operate. They set up and run mock town, city and state elections and engage in role-playing where towns are represented. Mayors lobby and representatives and senators will debate and enact legislation.

According to Rochelle Gimenez, dean of the School of Continuing Education, "Boys State is a program that we value since it teaches young men how to become exemplary citizens by educating them about the political process.  High school students attending this program have the opportunity to run for mock office and participate in all aspects of government. Many well-known politicians have attended Boys State in the past and have gone on to public service as adults. We look forward to having Boys State once again on our campus."

 

Drzewiecki Wins Statewide Teaching Award

Written by Dwight Bachman

drzewiecki.jpgPeter Drzewiecki, associate professor of environmental earth science and assistant chair of the Department of Environmental Earth Science, was named the Connecticut State Colleges and Universities System Winner of the Board of Regents/CSU Teaching Award.

Drzewiecki was recognized for his innovative use of outside-the-classroom education, including a mix of lab, field trips and student research projects. He has established an internship program for geology majors at the Connecticut Geological Survey, and his students frequently present the results of research from his class at regional professional conferences and campus symposia. Students uniformly consider his classroom teaching to be accessible and engaging.

The BOR/CSU Teaching Award is granted to faculty members who have "distinguished themselves as outstanding teachers for at least five years and have a minimum of a two-year track record of promoting instructional improvements for their programs or departments."

Jamel Ostwald, associate professor of history, was honored at the campus level for his research work. Ostwald has compiled an impressive record of research and creative activity and recently published "Vaubaun Under Siege: Engineering Efficiency and Martial Vigor in the War of the Spanish Succession," an award-winning book in military history. He also contributed three chapters on various aspects of 17th and 18th-century European military history in books published in Europe and the United States, and has written several book reviews in the peer-reviewed Journal of Military History.

"College Knowledge Days" Inspires Young Students to Achieve

Written by Chris Herman


college knowledge class.jpgWillimantic, Conn. - On May 22, 23 and 24, more than 1,500 students in grades five through 12 gathered in the Betty R. Tipton Room in the Student Center at Eastern Connecticut State University to participate in "College Knowledge Days." The students came from schools in Bloomfield, Bridgeport, Coventry, Danbury, East Hartford, Ellington, Enfield, Hartford, Meriden, New Britain, New Haven, Norwalk, Stamford, Union, Watertown, Wethersfield and Willimantic.

college knowledge fountain.jpgThe visiting students participated in a number of lectures and group activities facilitated by Eastern staff. The presentation, "Preparing for the Future," instructed students on how to research and choose the college that is right for them. Other presentations included "Financing My Future," which focused on paying for a postsecondary education. Group discussions analyzed payment options such as federal student aid, grants, work-study and loans. Group activities such as "When I Grow Up," gave visiting students the opportunity to discuss what they wanted for a future career and the process that it takes to attain that career.

 "College Knowledge Days are a great opportunity for students and educators to start the conversation about postsecondary options," said Eastern's assistant director of admissions Laquana Price, who coordinated the event. "The program allows students to start planning early for their future."

"College Knowledge Days" Inspires Young Students to Achieve

Written by Chris Herman

 

Willimantic, Conn. - On May 22, 23 and 24, more than 1,500 students in grades five through 12 gathered in the Betty R. Tipton Room in the Student Center at Eastern Connecticut State University to participate in "College Knowledge Days." The students came from schools in Bloomfield, Bridgeport, Coventry, Danbury, East Hartford, Ellington, Enfield, Hartford, Meriden, New Britain, New Haven, Norwalk, Stamford, Union, Watertown, Wethersfield and Willimantic. 

The visiting students participated in a number of lectures and group activities facilitated by Eastern staff. The presentation, "Preparing for the Future," instructed students on how to research and choose the college that is right for them. Other presentations included "Financing My Future," which focused on paying for a postsecondary education. Group discussions analyzed payment options such as federal student aid, grants, work-study and loans. Group activities such as "When I Grow Up," gave visiting students the opportunity to discuss what they wanted for a future career and the process that it takes to attain that career.

 "College Knowledge Days are a great opportunity for students and educators to start the conversation about postsecondary options," said Eastern's assistant director of admissions Laquana Price, who coordinated the event. "The program allows students to start planning early for their future."

 

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