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June 2011 Archives

SOAR Program to Help Prepare Students for First Year

Written by Arielle Cotoia

Willimantic, Conn. - Eastern Connecticut State University's Student Orientation, Advising and Registration (SOAR) program, mandatory for all new first-year students, will take place on Eastern's campus in June and July. The first session runs June 23-24. The program, which is designed to make first-year students aware of the resources available to them, consists of six (6) two-day sessions, during which approximately 155 incoming students per session will attend informational sessions and social events.

The goal of SOAR is to provide opportunities for new students to learn methods of academic and social success at Eastern. SOAR allows incoming students to meet other incoming students, current student leaders and members of the academic and student affairs staff.  Students will receive academic advisement and register for the fall semester.

During SOAR, students will experience one overnight stay in Constitution Hall, one of Eastern's freshman residence halls, to give them an opportunity to experience life on campus. Students will also have the opportunity to participate in several group sessions facilitated by student orientation counselors (SOCs), where they will engage with other students socially, have discussions and be able to ask student leaders questions about their experiences at Eastern. There will also be sessions about living on campus and commuting to Eastern. Michael Miller, a motivational speaker, radio host and best-selling author of "Dare to Live -Teenager's Guide to Understanding Suicide and Depression," will join the students in all six SOAR sessions to inspire them about the college experience.  

 

Advanced Placement Courses to Help Teachers

Arielle Cotoia 

Willimantic, Conn. - From July 11-15, Eastern Connecticut State University will host a series of Advanced Placement (AP) summer institutes for Connecticut teachers. One hundred forty teachers will participate in the workshops, which will take place in Eastern's Science Building. Topics include AP calculus, biology, environmental science, English language, English literature and statistics.  Seven workshops covering both beginning and advanced topics will be provided.

            The workshops are a collaborative initiative between Eastern, Hartford-based Project Opening Doors (POD) and the Willimantic-based Project Access for All. The goals of the workshops are to help increase the awareness of AP classes within school systems and provide teachers with methods to enhance their student's knowledge in the areas of math and science. Both of the projects are funded by a grant from the National Math and Science Initiative (NMSI) in partnership with EASTCONN, which runs the program.

"The uniqueness of this collaboration is that it pairs university professors with high school AP teachers," said Donna Wadstrup, internal projects manager of POD.  "Participants are given the unique perspective of what is expected both in a high school, as well as a university treatment of Advanced Placement material. The participants, in addition to receiving instruction from two different perspectives, have the opportunity to interact with their peers for a full week."

            Studies have shown a steady decline of American students pursuing math and science courses. According to the NMSI website, only 18 percent of 12th-grade students performed at or above the proficiency level in science. Project Opening Doors has helped to raise these figures -- the number of students in AP math and science has increased 12 percent in 2009, which is twice the national average and three times the average in the the state of Connecticut, according to CBIA's website.

"We are pleased to host workshops for experienced and new teachers," said Elizabeth Cowles, professor of biology and AP workshop organizer. "Our purpose is to make everyone feel comfortable and confident with the AP curriculum and more importantly, to develop an AP community.  To quote aWatkins Glen (NY) school, 'the foundation of every nation is the education of its youth.' We embrace that premise and keep the promise to all students.  Students are our future." 

For more information, contact Elizabeth Cowles at (860) 465-4385 or cowlese@easternct.edu.  

 

Common Ground Students Win Climate Change Award

Written by Arielle Cotoia

Willimantic, Conn. - Seven students from Common Ground Charter School in New Haven were named winners of a $1,000 prize in the 2011 Keep Connecticut Cool competition, aimed at promoting environmental awareness among Connecticut youth.

Their efforts were rewarded for demonstrating energy conservation in developing their sustainability plan.  Judging was held at Eastern Connecticut State University on June 4.

Team members included mentor Rachel Gilroy and students Cheryl Bedard, Nastassia Colbert, Rheji Freeman, Forest Hoefflinger, Dimitri Lemonas, Natalie Reyes and Jose Reyes. The team partnered with members of the school, community and businesses to implement a school-wide audit of energy, water and food use and waste.

             This year, 10 teams submitted plans for judging. Towns represented included East Hartford, Groton, Kensington, Hartford, New Haven, New London and Wolcott. Prizes from $500 to $2,500 totaling $10,000 were awarded for teamwork, collaboration, innovation and best plans. Prize money can be used to further the students' projects.

            The Keep Connecticut Cool Challenge is a contest for students in grades 4-12 who create

climate change solutions for their towns and communities.  Projects include recycling and energy

efficiency strategies in schools, including energy audits, installing thermostats and sensors, light

replacements and encouraging energy-saving behaviors.  Other projects include replacing Styrofoam trays in lunchrooms, raising climate awareness with student and community television messages, family forums, film festivals, energy fairs and music events.  Students also created plans to purchase rainforest land and carbon sequestration; support local farms; purchase solar installations; and create a "green" school store. In addition to presenting to contest judges, some teams also presented proposals to their boards of education and town councils.

Keep Connecticut Cool was started in 2006 as the Cool It Challenge, hosted by Clean Air-Cool Planet and funded by the Emily Hall Tremaine Foundation. The program has been administered by the Institute for Sustainable Energy (ISE) at Eastern Connecticut State University since 2007 and changed names to Keep Connecticut Cool in 2008. To date, 88 teams involving more than 800 students have worked to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in their schools and communities.

About the Institute for Sustainable Energy

            ISE at Eastern was established in 2001 to identify, develop and implement the means for achieving a sustainable energy future. The Institute focuses on matters relating to energy education, energy policy, efficiency conservation and load management, renewable energy, distributed generation, protection of environmental resources, and the dissemination of useful information on energy alternatives and sustainability to users and providers of energy. The Institute adds an unbiased focus on practical applications and dissemination of information about how to improve the energy profile and sustainability of Connecticut and the region.      

About the Emily Hall Tremaine Foundation
           
The Emily Hall Tremaine Foundation funds innovative projects which advance solutions to basic and enduring problems. With an overall emphasis on education, principally in the United States, takes an active role in three major areas: Art, Environment and Learning Disabilities. Website: www.tremainefoundation.org

 

Grasso Technical High School Students Win Climate Change Award

Written by Arielle Cotoia

Willimantic, Conn. - Four students from Grasso Technical High School in Groton were named winners of a $1,000 prize in the 2011 Keep Connecticut Cool competition, aimed at promoting environmental awareness among Connecticut youth.

Their efforts were rewarded for their use of collaboration in developing their sustainability plan.  Judging was held at Eastern Connecticut State University on June 4.

Team members included mentor Larry Fritch and students Ashley Chamberlin, Stephen Kral, Victoria Prejean and Catrina Nowakowski. The team partnered with members of the school, community and businesses to increase school-wide recycling efforts, composing and reusing materials; learn about and demonstrate wind and hydropower and make diodiesel; and produce plants in the school garden and greenhouse.

             This year, 10 teams submitted plans for judging. Towns represented included East Hartford, Groton, Kensington, Hartford, New Haven, New London and Wolcott. Prizes from $500 to $2,500 totaling $10,000 were awarded for teamwork, collaboration, innovation and best plans. Prize money can be used to further the students' projects.

            The Keep Connecticut Cool Challenge is a contest for students in grades 4-12 who create

climate change solutions for their towns and communities.  Projects include recycling and energy

efficiency strategies in schools, including energy audits, installing thermostats and sensors, light replacements and encouraging energy-saving behaviors.  Other projects include replacing Styrofoam trays in lunchrooms, raising climate awareness with student and community television messages, family forums, film festivals, energy fairs and music events.  Students also created plans to purchase rainforest land and carbon sequestration; support local farms; purchase solar installations; and create a "green" school store. In addition to presenting to contest judges, some teams also presented proposals to their boards of education and town councils.

Keep Connecticut Cool was started in 2006 as the Cool It Challenge, hosted by Clean Air-Cool Planet and funded by the Emily Hall Tremaine Foundation. The program has been administered by the Institute for Sustainable Energy (ISE) at Eastern Connecticut State University since 2007 and changed names to Keep Connecticut Cool in 2008. To date, 88 teams involving more than 800 students have worked to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in their schools and communities.

About the Institute for Sustainable Energy

            ISE at Eastern was established in 2001 to identify, develop and implement the means for achieving a sustainable energy future. The Institute focuses on matters relating to energy education, energy policy, efficiency conservation and load management, renewable energy, distributed generation, protection of environmental resources, and the dissemination of useful information on energy alternatives and sustainability to users and providers of energy. The Institute adds an unbiased focus on practical applications and dissemination of information about how to improve the energy profile and sustainability of Connecticut and the region.      

About the Emily Hall Tremaine Foundation
           
The Emily Hall Tremaine Foundation funds innovative projects which advance solutions to basic and enduring problems. With an overall emphasis on education, principally in the United States, takes an active role in three major areas: Art, Environment and Learning Disabilities. Website: www.tremainefoundation.org

 

Hopkins School Students Win Climate Change Award

Written by Arielle Cotoia

Willimantic, Conn. - Six students from Hopkins School in New Haven were named winners of a $1,000 prize in the 2011 Keep Connecticut Cool competition, aimed at promoting environmental awareness among Connecticut youth.

Their efforts were rewarded for best overall in the Middle School and High School division in developing their sustainability plan.  Judging was held at Eastern Connecticut State University on June 4.

Team members included mentor Cilla Kellert and students Sophia Chua-Rosenfeld, Amanda Dobbyn, Jerrod Dobkin, Joe Rosen, Claire Stepanek and Sarah Wagner. The team partnered with members of the school, community and businesses to promote "trayless" in the dining hall with savings in electricity, hot water, cleaning chemicals and less food waste; participated in the Green Cup Challenge to decrease energy use and improve recycling; encouraged carpooling with a survey, incentives and coupons.  

             This year, 10 teams submitted plans for judging. Towns represented included East Hartford, Groton, Kensington, Hartford, New Haven, New London and Wolcott. Prizes from $500 to $2,500 totaling $10,000 were awarded for teamwork, collaboration, innovation and best plans. Prize money can be used to further the students' projects.

            The Keep Connecticut Cool Challenge is a contest for students in grades 4-12 who create

climate change solutions for their towns and communities.  Projects include recycling and energy efficiency strategies in schools, including energy audits, installing thermostats and sensors, light replacements and encouraging energy-saving behaviors.  Other projects include replacing Styrofoam trays in lunchrooms, raising climate awareness with student and community television messages, family forums, film festivals, energy fairs and music events.  Students also created plans to purchase rainforest land and carbon sequestration; support local farms; purchase solar installations; and create a "green" school store. In addition to presenting to contest judges, some teams also presented proposals to their boards of education and town councils.

Keep Connecticut Cool was started in 2006 as the Cool It Challenge, hosted by Clean Air-Cool Planet and funded by the Emily Hall Tremaine Foundation. The program has been administered by the Institute for Sustainable Energy (ISE) at Eastern Connecticut State University since 2007 and changed names to Keep Connecticut Cool in 2008. To date, 88 teams involving more than 800 students have worked to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in their schools and communities.

About the Institute for Sustainable Energy

            ISE at Eastern was established in 2001 to identify, develop and implement the means for achieving a sustainable energy future. The Institute focuses on matters relating to energy education, energy policy, efficiency conservation and load management, renewable energy, distributed generation, protection of environmental resources, and the dissemination of useful information on energy alternatives and sustainability to users and providers of energy. The Institute adds an unbiased focus on practical applications and dissemination of information about how to improve the energy profile and sustainability of Connecticut and the region.      

About the Emily Hall Tremaine Foundation
           
The Emily Hall Tremaine Foundation funds innovative projects which advance solutions to basic and enduring problems. With an overall emphasis on education, principally in the United States, takes an active role in three major areas: Art, Environment and Learning Disabilities. Website: www.tremainefoundation.org

 

Saint Paul School Students Win Climate Change Award

Written by Arielle Cotoia

Willimantic, Conn. - Eight students from Saint Paul School in Kensington were named winners of the $1,000 prize in the 2011 Keep Connecticut Cool competition, aimed at promoting environmental awareness among Connecticut youth.

Their efforts were rewarded for their demonstration of energy savings and use of collaboration in developing their sustainability plan. Judging was held at Eastern Connecticut State University on June 4.

Team members included mentor Elaine Kottler and students Victoria DiPinto, Sarah Loitz, Elizabeth LoPreiato, Hannah Paszczuk, Gabi Pokorski, Evan Rigsby, Josh Rigsby  and Chloe Sisson. The team partnered with members of the school, community and businesses to hold America Recycles Day, Earth Day and Make a Difference Day; improved recycling and energy conservation at their school; and switched the school newsletter from paper to email.

             This year, 10 teams submitted plans for judging. Towns represented included East Hartford, Groton, Kensington, Hartford, New Haven, New London and Wolcott. Prizes from $500 to $2,500 totaling $10,000 were awarded for teamwork, collaboration, innovation and best plans. Prize money can be used to further the students' projects.

            The Keep Connecticut Cool Challenge is a contest for students in grades 4-12 who create

climate change solutions for their towns and communities.  Projects include recycling and energy efficiency strategies in schools, including energy audits, installing thermostats and sensors, light replacements and encouraging energy-saving behaviors.  Other projects include replacing Styrofoam trays in lunchrooms, raising climate awareness with student and community television messages, family forums, film festivals, energy fairs and music events.  Students also created plans to purchase rainforest land and carbon sequestration; support local farms; purchase solar installations; and create a "green" school store. In addition to presenting to contest judges, some teams also presented proposals to their boards of education and town councils.

Keep Connecticut Cool was started in 2006 as the Cool It Challenge, hosted by Clean Air-Cool Planet and funded by the Emily Hall Tremaine Foundation. The program has been administered by the Institute for Sustainable Energy (ISE) at Eastern Connecticut State University since 2007 and changed names to Keep Connecticut Cool in 2008. To date, 88 teams involving more than 800 students have worked to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in their schools and communities.

About the Institute for Sustainable Energy

            ISE at Eastern was established in 2001 to identify, develop and implement the means for achieving a sustainable energy future. The Institute focuses on matters relating to energy education, energy policy, efficiency conservation and load management, renewable energy, distributed generation, protection of environmental resources, and the dissemination of useful information on energy alternatives and sustainability to users and providers of energy. The Institute adds an unbiased focus on practical applications and dissemination of information about how to improve the energy profile and sustainability of Connecticut and the region.      

About the Emily Hall Tremaine Foundation
           
The Emily Hall Tremaine Foundation funds innovative projects which advance solutions to basic and enduring problems. With an overall emphasis on education, principally in the United States, takes an active role in three major areas: Art, Environment and Learning Disabilities. Website: www.tremainefoundation.org

 

Youth Soccer Players to Learn Fundamentals at Camp

Writen Arielle Cotoia

Willimantic, Conn. - Eastern Connecticut State University's Athletic Department will host its annual summer youth soccer camp from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. July 11-15. This clinic is for girls and boys ages 5-14 of all skill levels. Tuition is $200. All funds will support Eastern's soccer program.  

The goal of the camp is to provide each camper with technical skill training in dribbling, passing, receiving, shooting and heading. Individual goal-keeper training will also be available. Campers will play small-sided games involving fewer players on a smaller-sized field, which allows each camper more individual playing time and more exposure to the soccer ball.

Greg DeVito, Eastern's head men's soccer coach, and Adam Phaiah, assistant men's soccer coach, will lead the camp along with current and former college soccer players. DeVito was the 2007 Little East Conference (LEC) Coach of the Year and Phaiah was the 2007 Thomac Kruseski Young Coach of the Year. The ratio of camper to coach is 7 to 1.

 "The camp is an excellent way for young players to learn the fundamentals of soccer," said DeVito. "It provides structured curriculum to promote learning and a positive, fun camp experience."

To register for the camp, interested persons should visit www.ecsuyouthsoccercamp.com. For more information, contact Greg DeVito at (860) 465-4334 or devitog@easternct.edu.

 

 

Eastern's Police Department Encourages Community to 'Ride for the Flame'

Written by Arielle Cotoia

Eastern's Police Department Encourages Community to 'Ride for the Flame'

 

Willimantic, Conn. - On June 26, Eastern Connecticut State University's police department, along with the Woodbridge Police Department, will participate in the second annual Ride for the Flame charity. The Ride for the Flame will begin and end at Whelen Engineering in Chester.

Ride for the Flame is a bicycle event created by Eastern Lt. Tom Madera and Sgt. Brian McCarthy of the Woodbridge Police Department to raise money for Special Olympics Connecticut. "This event is for a worthy cause," said Madera. "Last year, we raised more than $37,000 for Special Olympics Connecticut. We are very excited and confident in this year's event. We added a 10-mile family route and expanded our Public Safety competition. Zane's Cycle in Branford and Amity Bikes in Woodbridge will donate bikes as part a raffle. This is a fun-filled day for everyone, of any age and with any riding skill."

The 10- and 25-mile rides will take place along the Connecticut River. The 50-mile ride will take place along the river passing the Historic Goodspeed Opera House in East Haddam. The 100-mile ride will cover areas around the river including shore points of Essex and Goodspeed Opera House, Devil's Hop Yard State Park and Gillette Castle State Park in East Haddam.

The public safety mountain bike competition will consist of individual and team

competitions on courses similar to skills the riders have mastered in police cycling certification

courses.

Registration is $50, which includes the official bike jersey for the event. For more information about registration dates and starting times for each ride, visit http://www.soct.org/worxcms_published/special_events_page608.shtml. Persons interested in participating in these events should contact Officer Dave DeNunzio at Denunziod@easternct.edu or Sgt. Lisa Hamilton at Hamiltonl@easternct.edu or (860) 465-5310.

 

Graduate Students Receive their Master's

Written by Arielle Cotoia

Willimantic, Conn. - On May 22, more than 100 graduate students celebrated earning their master's degrees at Eastern Connecticut State University's 121st Commencement exercises at the XL Center in Hartford. Many of them are from your readership area, and we have listed them by town for your convenience. The list is attached below.

            Eastern is proud of all its students. This accomplishment by graduate students is the result of hard work, dedication and discipline. We believe their families look forward to seeing their names in your publication. Thank you for helping us recognize their achievement.

 

SIFT Program Provides Hands-on Experience for Future Teachers

Written by Arielle Cotoia

Willimantic, Conn. -- From July 10-29, approximately 20 high school juniors and seniors from  more than 20 Connecticut school districts will participate in the 15th annual Summer Institute for Future Teachers (SIFT) program at Eastern Connecticut State University.

"Eastern and the Capital Region Education Council (CREC) created the program, which aims to increase the number of students who consider teaching as a career; emphasizes the growing role technology plays in teaching and learning; and expands efforts to recruit teachers from the diverse communities in Connecticut," said David Stoloff, professor of education and director of the University's Center for Educational Excellence.

During the program, students are immersed in coursework and field trips; work with pre-school and elementary schoolchildren; integrate educational theory with practical experience;

and study and live within the rich multicultural environment of Connecticut classrooms.

Students in the program prepare and present lesson plans; create positive learning environments that celebrate cultural diversity; give detailed reports defending their choices for classroom layout; maintain journals reflecting on their teaching observations and experiences; and develop websites and electronic portfolios.  

Successful participants will receive three undergraduate credits for the course titled

"Teaching in the 21st Century." This year's theme is "wellness for students and teachers,"

which emphasizes the importance of health and wellness for effective learning.

Stoloff along with Leah Barbuto, professor of early childhood education, and Terrell Green, teacher at Naubuc School in Glastonbury, will serve as mentors for the students. SIFT residential assistants and Eastern students Alexander Cross and Whitley Mingo will also be on hand to help.

On July 29, parents, school principals, counselors, teachers and other community members will gather in the auditorium of the Science Building to attend the SIFT closing ceremony.

For more information about the SIFT program, contact David Stoloff at (860) 465-5501 or stoloffd@easternct.edu.

 

Students Apply Hard Work and Determination at STEP/CAP

Written by Arielle Cotoia

Willimantic, Conn. - On June 26, more than 70 students hoping to enroll in Eastern Connecticut State University in the fall will arrive on campus to begin the 28th year of the Summer Transition at Eastern Program/Contract Admission Program (STEP/CAP). Classes will begin June 27.

            Through August 5, students from Bridgeport, Hartford, New Haven, New London, Norwich, Waterbury, Willimantic and from out-of-state will attend intensive credit-bearing courses in math and writing, as well as rigorous workshops in social sciences, library research methods, public speaking, study skills and critical thinking. Those who are successful will be admitted as freshmen for Eastern's fall semester.

            Organized around the theme of "hard work and determination," students will come to campus having read selective readings that communicate the message "if you want something, you have to work hard for it," according to Margaret Hébert, director of STEP/CAP. Once the students begin classes, they will have additional readings to complete and discussions to participate in that follow the program theme.     

"For more than a quarter of a century, this program has made a difference," said Hébert. "We ask the students to be motivated, disciplined and ready to work hard to make the changes needed to start and then complete the transition from high school to college."

            Successful STEP/CAP students have gone on to become doctors, lawyers, teachers, insurance executives, government officials, personnel managers and much more - remarkable achievements for young people labeled in high school as incapable of college level work.

            Once students settle into Eastern and begin their classes, they will take a field trip to Boston, where they are scheduled to enjoy citywide trolley tours and visit historic spots such as the Freedom Trail.  

 

American Legion Boys State at Eastern

Written by Arielle Cotoia

Willimantic, Conn.--From June 18-24, more than 200 high school juniors from across the state will converge on the campus of Eastern Connecticut State University to attend the 24th annual American Legion Boys State.

During Boys State, the students will learn how state and municipal governments operate. They will set up and run mock town, city and state elections; engage in role-playing where towns are represented; mayors will lobby; and representatives and senators will debate and enact legislation.

American Legion Boys State Commissioner David Greenleaf praised Eastern for hosting Boys State over the years. "Eastern makes the summer program a very positive experience for young people who cannot help but return to their communities with a desire to make a positive contribution."

"Eastern Connecticut State University is proud of our longstanding relationship with Boys State, which provides a model of exemplary programming highlighting good citizenship," said Rochelle Gimenez, dean of Eastern's School of Continuing Education. "We are delighted to be part of an initiative that grooms future leaders on a local, state and national level. Once again we look forward to hosting Boys State on our campus."

 

University Police Help Ignite "Flame of Hope" for Special Olympians

 Written by Arielle Cotoia

Willimantic, Conn. - The Eastern Connecticut State University Police Department, along with members of the Willimantic Police Department, will participate in the Special Olympics Law Enforcement Torch Run at 8 a.m. on June 9. The public is encouraged to take part in the run or support the runners and Special Olympians along the university route. 

This year's goal for 2011 is to raise $550,000 for Special Olympics Connecticut. Runners should arrive at the Child and Family Development Resource Center Lot at 7:55 a.m. The race will begin at the corner of High Street and Charter Oak and proceed through campus, past the Foster Clock Tower before heading south onto the streets of Willimantic and finishing at the Mansfield town line. All runners are required to sign a waiver and provide a $10 donation for a Torch Run shirt that must be worn throughout the run.

More than 1,500 Special Olympics Connecticut athletes and law enforcement personnel will carry the "Flame of Hope" 530 miles in 100 Connecticut cities and towns.  Eastern's Police Department has participated in the run since 2001 and has raised approximately $3,000 each year for Special Olympics Connecticut.

            The mission of the Law Enforcement Torch Run for Special Olympics Connecticut is to raise funds and awareness of the Special Olympics movement. "The Law Enforcement Torch Run in Connecticut is more than just an event," says Sergeant Luis Rosa, Torch Run director and an 18-year volunteer at the event. "It is a mission, a serious commitment by the law enforcement community to pay homage to our heroes, the Special Olympics Connecticut athletes and their families."

            To participate in the run or to make a donation, please contact Eastern Officer David DeNunzio at Denunziod@easternct.edu or Eastern Police Lt. Tom Madera at Maderat@easternct.edu or (860) 465-5310.   

 

Girls State to Promote Citizenship and Democracy

Written by Arielle Cotoia

            Willimantic, Conn. - From June 25 through July 1, Eastern Connecticut State University will host more than 180 high school juniors from around the state who will participate in the Laurel Girls State program.

Sponsored by the American Legion Auxiliary, Laurel Girls State prepares young women for careers in government through citizenship and democracy. Program officials will focus on patriotism by involving students in all aspects of government and by enhancing pride in America. Students will elect officials on a local and state level, who will then carry out the duties of their offices. Students will also write bills and enact legislation.

            "We are delighted to host Girls State for the seventh year in a row," said Victoria Lorenzen, program facilitator in the Office of Professional Development in Eastern's School of Continuing Education.  "We are developing a wonderful collaboration, working with professionals such as Sue Larsen, chair and director of Laurel Girls State. We hope to develop the same long-term relationship that we have with Boys State, which returned to campus this year for the 24th year in a row." 

The Girls State program has provided students with hands-on citizenship experience and government participation for more than 65 years. Girls State officials hope the experience will result in lifelong participation in government.

 

"College Knowledge Days" Inspires Young Students to Achieve

Written by Arielle Cotoia

college knowledge- arrival on campus.JPG            Willimantic, Conn. - More than 1,500 students in grades five through 12 will gather in the Betty R. Tipton Room in the Student Center at Eastern Connecticut State University to participate in "College Knowledge Days." The students come from schools in Bloomfield, Bridgeport, Coventry, Danbury, East Hartford, Ellington, Enfield, Hartford, Meriden, New Britain, New Haven, Norwalk, Stamford, Union, Watertown, Wethersfield and Willimantic. The events will be held from 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. on June 1, 2 and 8.

"College Knowledge Days" is designed to inspire students to dream of college and help them plan and prepare for their future careers. On June 1, 530 students in grades five and seven are expected to attend. Five hundred fifty students in grades eight and nine will participate on June 2 and an additional 500 students in grades nine through 12 will take part in the activities on June 8.

Students will be introduced to "Project Opening Doors," a partnership between the public and private sectors that seeks to increase Connecticut student participation and achievement in Advanced Placement courses and better ensure their success in college. They will also learn about "KnowHow2Go," a website launched nationally in 2007 by The American Council on Education, Lumina Foundation for Education and the Ad Council. The KnowHow2Go website is designed to help students plan and prepare for their postsecondary education.

 

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