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September 2009 Archives

Gender Gap Author to Lecture at Eastern

Written by Jack Meltzer

Willimantic, Conn. - Paul Kellstedt, author and professor of political science at Texas A&M University, will lecture at Eastern Connecticut State University on Oct. 14 as part of Eastern's University Hour series.  The address begins at 3 p.m. in the Student Center Theatre.  The public is invited.  Admission is free.   

Kellstedt's lecture, "Are Men from Mars and Women from Venus?" offers a new view on the gender gap. Gender differences is an ongoing research topic, with some seeing the issue as a physiological/biological difference between men and women while others attributing the difference to social and political issues.

            Kellstedt's special research interest is in American politics and political methodology. He is the author of, "The Mass Media and the Dynamics of American Racial Attitudes," which explores the theme of racial attitudes in America over the last half-century, and "The Fundamentals of Political Science Research."

 

Eastern to Host 13th Annual Relay for Life

Written by Kevin Antonucci

Relay for Life Team-Sitting.JPG

                    

     Willimantic, Conn. - Eastern Connecticut State University will once again host the Windham Area Relay for Life on Oct. 17 and 18.  This 24-hour event, which benefits the American Cancer Society, runs from noon on Saturday to noon on Sunday.  The relay will take place at the Eastern Sports Complex in Mansfield.  Local organizations, area groups and businesses, and Eastern students, faculty and staff are encouraged to attend and participate.  The money raised through the relay will support cancer research, education, advocacy and patient service programs.

            One of the highlights of the relay is the traditional survivor's lap, held just prior to the relay.  The survivor's lap is dedicated to those who have survived their battle with cancer.  There will be tents with food and games for all of the teams that are participating.

            Another highlight of this event is the candle lighting ceremony, which will be held at 8:30 p.m. on Saturday.  The luminaries will be placed around the track as part of the dedication.  Signs in the bleachers will display the word "hope" as a commitment to the continuing fight against cancer. 

            The Relay for Life was started in 1985 by Gordon Klatt in Tacoma, WA, and continues to be a worldwide event, taking place in more than 20 countries. Last year, more than 5,000 relays took place; 200 of them in New England.

For more information on how you can register for the relay for life, please contact Kim Silcox at Silcoxk@easternct.edu or call (860) 465-4426.

 

Classic Brass at Eastern Connecticut State University

Written by Kate Harner

Willimantic, CT -- Classic Brass, a band that performs British-style brass band music, will perform at 2:30 p.m. on Oct. 3 in Shafer Auditorium at Eastern Connecticut State University. Eastern's Performing Arts Department will sponsor the event. The public is invited. Admission is free.

Classic Brass will perform brass band transcriptions of pieces by George Gershwin, Gustav Holst and Morton Gould. The program will also include original brass band compositions by James Curnow, Philip Sparke and Paul Lovatt-Cooper.

Started in 1988, Classic Brass gives local adults who played brass wind instruments throughout high school and college the opportunity to continue performing in their later years. Adam Crowe has directed the band since 2003. Its musical repertoire varies from sentimental songs usually associated with concert bands and pieces selected from operatic literature to more informal pieces from the Swing Band era and the Great American Songbook.

For more information, contact Dave Yutzey, band manager, at (860) 429-9831 or dayutzey@snet.net.

 

Brown Bag Concert Series at Eastern

Written by Kate Harner

Willimantic, Conn. - Eastern Connecticut State University will host the first 2009-10 performance of the Brown Bag Concert Series at noon on Oct. 2 in Shafer Auditorium. The public is invited. Admission is free.

The Brown Bag Concert Series is held at noon the first Friday of each month. Concerts include performances by either Eastern faculty or students. David Belles, associate professor of performing arts, created the series to allow students studying applied music to perform in a relaxed environment while showcasing their musical talents.

"This opportunity is outside the normal purview of large ensemble and chamber concerts that occur regularly on campus," says Jeffrey Calissa, assistant professor of performing arts and faculty coordinator of the series. "It serves as a way for individuals to perform solo material."

The concert on Oct. 2 will be performed by Eastern faculty as a kick-off to the series and to demonstrate their musical abilities. The audience, which is encouraged to bring lunch, will sit onstage in 40 seats set up in two rows to contribute to a salon-type setting rather than a large auditorium.

For more information about this series or upcoming Brown Bag Concert Series, contact

Museum Director to Discuss the History of Windham

Written by Jack Meltzer

Willimantic, Conn. - Beverly York, director of the Windham Mill and Textile Museum, will discuss the historical and cultural background of the Windham community at 3 p.m. on Sept. 30 at Eastern Connecticut State University. York's presentation, which is part of Eastern's University Hour, will take place in the Betty R. Tipton Room of the Student Center.

York will focus upon the 19th and 20th century cotton thread manufacturers as well as mill workers and their ethnic backgrounds during the industrial age. There will also be sign ups throughout the presentation to help staff the Mill Museum.

University Hour is Eastern's Wednesday afternoon cultural and educational series. For more information on this and other University Hour events, please call (860) 465-5245.

 

5,610 Students Taking Classes at Eastern

Written by Dwight Bachman

 

Admissions.JPGWillimantic, CT -- The final enrollment figures at Eastern Connecticut State University are in, and University officials are very pleased. As of Sept. 21, there are 4,327 full-time undergraduates, 916 part-time undergraduates, and 367 graduate students enrolled at Eastern, Connecticut's only public liberal arts university.  Overall, 5,610 students are enrolled in classes at Eastern, an increase of nearly four percent above last year.

In addition, the average SAT scores of incoming freshmen is 1031, up 21 points over fall 2008. The incoming class hails from towns across Connecticut, the United States and around the world. Of Connecticut's 169 towns, 163 are represented on Eastern's campus. Students are coming from 23 states and 47 countries, including China, Norway, Turkey, Sweden, South Korea among others.  

"This is wonderful," said Kimberly Crone, director of admissions and enrollment management. "We reached more than 100 percent of our enrollment goal with undergraduate students and 112 percent of our goal with graduate students. These numbers show that students who choose to attend Eastern embrace our liberal arts mission and core values inside and outside of the classroom. They also know they will get the best bang for their buck at Eastern, and they feel very confident they will leave Eastern in four years as top-notched critical thinkers and future leaders." Crone said students are attracted by the university's reputation of having  a faculty dedicated to the success of each student, small classes and state-of-the art facilities.

 

Blood Drive at Eastern

Written by Kevin Antonucci

Willimantic, Conn. - Eastern Connecticut State University will conduct a blood drive as part of the University's Dean's Cup competition among residence halls, from 10:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Oct. 5 and 6.  The drive will take place in the Betty R. Tipton Room of the Student Center. This will be the first of four blood drives at Eastern this year.

The Dean's Cup competition is an academic-and service-related event that promotes spirit and collaboration among students living in the residence halls on campus. Its purpose is to see which residence hall can get the most students to attend an open-rec night, donate the most blood, have the highest GPA and much more.

For appointments and more information on how you can participate in the blood drive, please go to www.givelife.org or contact Irene Cretella at (860) 465-0090.

 

 

Cromwell Crawford Kicks Off Arts/Lecture Series

Written by Kate Harner

 

 

Cromwell Crawford.JPGWillimantic, Conn. - S. Cromwell Crawford, author and professor emeritus at the University of Hawaii at Manoa, opens Eastern Connecticut State University's Ninth Annual Arts and Lecture Series on Oct. 15 at 4 p.m. in the Paul E. Johnson Sr. Community Room located in the J. Eugene Smith Library.

Crawford's lecture will focus on religion's controversial influence in the bioethics debate. Although many believe medicine and scientific study should not involve a religious perspective, Crawford will challenge this way of thinking by utilizing his knowledge of comparative religions. He will discuss morality and religious philosophy and how each pertains to current bioethical issues, such as cloning, the human genome project and genetic engineering.

Crawford has studied religion since 1952. He received his doctorate of theology from the Pacific School of Religion in Berkeley, CA, in 1966. He is the author of books such as "Dilemmas of Life and Death: Hindu Ethics in a North American Context," "The Evolution of Hindu Ethical Ideals" and "Hindu Bioethics for the 21st Century." He is also an ordained minister of the Methodist Church and a Jain activist for peace and non-killing.

Tickets for Crawford's lecture are $10 for the general public. To purchase tickets, call (860) 465-0036 or email tickets@easternct.edu. For more information about other upcoming Arts and Lecture Series events, visit http://www.easternct.edu/artsandlecture/.  

 

FEMALES Walk to End Crohn's/Colitis Disease

Written by Kate Harner

 

Crohn's Colitis Walk for FEMALES.jpg            Willimantic, CT --  FEMALES (Females Excelling, Maturing to Achieve, Leadership, Excellence and Success), a student club at Eastern Connecticut State University that promotes leadership and unity among women on campus, will hold a march to raise funds, increase public awareness and encourage research to end Crohn's disease and colitis on Oct. 11. The march will take place from noon to 4 p.m. on the track next to Eastern's baseball complex on Mansfield Road in Mansfield. The march will include food, T-shirts, music and other forms of entertainment.

Crohn's and colitis are collectively called inflammatory bowel disease. Some scientists believe the disease is caused by the body's immune system attacking itself, causing inflammation in the intestines. The disease is usually diagnosed in persons in their teens or twenties, but can occur at any point in life. Crohn's disease can be a chronic, recurrent condition or can cause minimal symptoms with or without medical treatment. No cure exists and few medical options are available for those who live with the disease.

"Some of the symptoms include abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting, fever, fatigue and loss of appetite and weight," said FEMALES Vice President Soncheray Hall. "The disease can also affect the joints, eyes, skin and liver. Children who have Crohn's disease may suffer delayed growth and sexual development."

Amy Goldberg, a junior from Westchester, NY, majoring in art therapy at Eastern and a member of FEMALES, was diagnosed with Crohn's disease at age 8 and will walk in the march. "My mission is to get people educated and informed about the disease and make it acceptable for patients to talk about their illness. There is a large community of people suffering with the disease but they all have to suffer in silence because the disease isn't the most glamorous," says Goldberg.

A donation fee for Eastern students who wish to participate in the march is $3. The fee is $10 for faculty, staff and the general public, and $35 for clubs and organizations. Participating clubs and organizations must register as club members by Oct. 3. To register, contact Soncheray Hall at halls@stu.easternct.edu or at (860) 461-4234.

 

Eastern and Lions Club Support Habitat for Humanity

Written by Kate Harner

Willimantic, CT -- Eastern Connecticut State University's Habitat for Humanity Club and members of the Willimantic Lions Club are partnering on a Habitat for Humanity project to paint an elderly person's home on Sept. 26 in Willimantic.

Although Habitat for Humanity International and the Lions Club International Foundation (LCIF) have collaborated since 1999, this Partnership for Humanity will be the first time the two local organizations have worked together. "It was rewarding for all of us to have the opportunity to brighten up the living space of an elderly Willimantic resident," says Charles Wynn, Partnership for Humanity chairman of the Willimantic Lions Club and chemistry professor at Eastern.

"It was also a great opportunity for the Willimantic Lions to meet a group of Eastern students who have been making a difference in the community and for those students to learn about the world's largest and most active service organization."

The LCIF has 1.3 million members in 205 countries and areas across the world. Besides raising $12 million to build houses for those who have a family member with a disability, the LCIF has engaged volunteers in their service helping the blind and visually impaired since its start in 1917.

Habitat for Humanity is a nonprofit, nondenominational Christian Housing ministry committed to building houses for those in need. Since its creation in 1976, the organization has helped more than 1.5 million people in more than 90 countries by building more than 300,000 houses.

To learn more about this project, contact Frank Mauro by calling (860) 423-2721 or emailing fperfect@99main.com. For more information about Lions Club International, visit www.lionsclub.org. For more information about Habitat for Humanity International, visit www.habitat.org. For information about Eastern Connecticut State University chapter of Habitat for Humanity, contact Peter Bachiochi, faculty advisor, at (860) 465-4551.

 

 

Mental Health Advocate Speaks at Eastern

Written by Kevin Antonucci

 

MALMON 9-14-09.jpg 

Willimantic, Conn. - "Suicide is the second leading cause of death among college students," said Alison Malmon, founder and executive director of the Active Minds Suicidal Prevention Group, as she spoke to Eastern's students, faculty, and staff in the Student Center Theatre on Sept. 15.

            She continued, "Every 18 minutes in the United States, a suicide happens, and another innocent life is lost." Malmon's lecture was in observance of Suicide Prevention Week, declared last year by Gov. M. Jodi Rell.

            Malmon created Active Minds, a student advocacy group, in 2001 during her junior year of college after her older brother, Brian, took his own life. "He was a star, nonetheless, just an incredible person that everybody loved," Malmon said of Brian, who maintained a 3.9 GPA, wrote for the local newspaper and eventually became a sport's editor and columnist. "Brian was the ideal student that we all want to be as we grow up."

            Malmon said that 15 to 25 is the average age range for an adult to become schizophrenic and/or clinically depressed. Statistics show that 19 million adults are clinically depressed and one in every five adults experiences depression at least once.        

            Malmon's whole life perspective changed after watching her brother deal with schizophrenia before taking his own life while attending Columbia University. No one at the University of Pennsylvania, where she attended college, seemed interested in dealing with the issue, so she stepped forward.

            "After watching everything with my brother, and then entering college, I knew immediately something had to be done to help students cope with the many stresses involved in attending college." Malmon and Active Minds try to create a comfortable environment for students to speak about troubles, worries and concerns that may lead to depression. Active Minds seeks to utilize peer advocacy and get students to speak out.

            Malmon's Active Minds group is in its ninth year and operates on college campuses across the United States, helping students prevent suicide by seeking help when it's needed. The organization has been featured live on CNN and Good Morning America and also featured in the New York Times.  Malmon said more than 90 percent of new college students have something psychologically bothering them when entering college.

            Malmon went on to say she has found that students really want to be involved in facilitating others to seek help if they need to talk to someone. "All I want is for the students to talk together and look out for one another so that nobody has to go through what my family and I dealt with," Malmon stated in conclusion of her lecture at Eastern.

 

Journalist from Iraq War to Speak at Eastern

Written by Dwight Bachman

 

Dahr Jamail image.JPGWillimantic, Conn. - Journalist Dahr Jamail will speak on "Reinventing Journalism:  Thoughts of an Unembedded Reporter in Iraq," at 1 p.m. on Sept. 21. in the Betty R. Tipton Room of Eastern Connecticut State University's Student Center.  Prior to his lecture, Jamail will hold a press conference at 12:30, also in the Betty R. Tipton Room The press conference will be held in the same room as the lecture.

We cordially invite you to attend.  A reception and book signing will follow Jamail's presentation, and he will be available for follow up one-on-one interviews with members of the media.

Jamail's lecture is in honor of the United Nations International Day of Peace.  Dissatisfied with mainstream media coverage of the war in Iraq, Jamail decided to leave his job as a rescue ranger on Mount Denali in Alaska and headed to Iraq. He was determined to engage directly with Iraqis outside of the Green Zone to provide a different type of coverage that highlighted the human impact of this conflict. 

Since 2003, Jamail has provided coverage of the Iraqi people and of U.S. soldiers, bearing witness to the effects of the war on the lives of ordinary Iraqis, their security and well-being, and their access to important resources like clean water and health care. Jamail also lectures on the impact of the conflict upon U.S. soldiers and others, reporting on the incidence of post-traumatic stress disorder and acts of resistance by some soldiers. 

He reports to news organizations such as Inter Press Service and Le Monde Diplomatique; has appeared in and on numerous news media outlets, such as the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) and National Public Radio ( NPR); and been a frequent guest on college radio stations across America, including UCONN's FM.91.7 WHUS. 

Jamail has earned numerous awards for his independent work, including the prestigious 2008 Martha Gellhorn Award for Journalism, The Lannan Foundation Writing Residency Fellowship, the James Aronson Award for Social Justice Journalism, the Joe A. Callaway Award for Civic Courage and Project Censored awards.

For more information about Jamail's lecture, contact Political Science Professor Helma de Vries at devriesh@easternct.edu or call (860) 465-5091.

 

Federal Bank of New York Official to Lecture at Eastern

Written by Jack Meltzer

 

Christine cummings image.JPGWillimantic, Conn. -  Christine Cumming, first vice president of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, will lecture at Eastern Connecticut State University, at 11 a.m. on Sept. 29 in the Paul E. Johnson Sr. Community Conference Room of the J. Eugene Smith Library.  Cumming, as the bank's chief operating officer, will lecture on "The National and International Economy,"  Her presentation is sponsored by Eastern's David T. Chase Free Enterprise Institute.  Admission is free, and the public is invited. 

Cumming has served with the Federal Reserve Bank of New York since 1979.  Prior to her current position, Cumming served as executive vice president; director of research; and as a member of the bank's management committee.

Cumming holds a Bachelor of Science and a Doctorate in Economics from the University of Minnesota.

 

Rights Activist Julie Chávez Rodriguez at Eastern

Written by Kate Harner

Julie Chavez Rodriguez.JPG            Willimantic, Conn. - Julie Chávez Rodriguez, granddaughter of labor and civil rights activist César Chávez and programs director for the César E. Chávez Foundation, will speak at 3 p.m. on Oct. 7 at Eastern Connecticut State University. Rodriguez will lecture in the Paul E. Johnson Sr. Community Conference Room of the J. Eugene Smith Library. The event is open to the public. Admission is free.

            At a young age, Rodriguez was exposed to the working people's struggle at the United Farm Workers' (UFW) headquarters at La Paz, located in Keene, California. Rodriguez began volunteering with the UFW at age 5. Since then, she has energized La Causa, the movement to advance farm workers' rights, through campaigns and other events. Rodriguez supports service-learning projects by leading the César E. Chávez Foundation's "Educating the Heart" school program and participating as a fellow in National Service-Learning Emerging Leaders Initiative, the National Service-Learning Partnership and the National Youth Leadership Council.

University Hour is Eastern's Wednesday afternoon cultural and educational series. For more information on this and other University Hour events, please call (860) 465-5245.

 

Valuing Community Connections in Connecticut

Written by kate Harner

Willimantic, Conn. - The Community Connections: A Summit for Engaging Nonprofits, Volunteers and Higher Education conference will be held from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Oct. 2 in the Betty R. Tipton Room at Eastern Connecticut State University. Sponsors of the conference include Eastern's Center for Community Engagement (CCE) and Center for Educational Excellence (CEE), the University of Connecticut Office of Community Outreach, Windham Region United Way, the Nonprofit Alliance of Northeastern Connecticut (NANC) and the Connecticut Campus Compact. The conference is open to executive directors and staff of community-based organizations (CBOs) and higher education faculty and staff. Registration and payment deadline is Sept. 25. Registration is $15 per person.

            Eastern President Elsa Núñez will greet conferees. Afterward, Susan Dunn, president of United Way of Central and Northeastern Connecticut, will provide the keynote address, "Volunteering in these Times." Participants will then engage in the three workshop blocks, consisting of three sessions each. Workshops range from "Organizational Change and the Impact on Volunteers" to "Generational Differences" and "Service Learning 101."

            "The goals of this conference are to increase the capacity of local CBOs to effectively utilize and manage volunteers," says Kimberly Silcox, director of the CCE. "This conference also will create opportunities for collaboration that can mutually benefit higher education faculty, staff, students and community organizations."

            The conference intends to bridge the gap between the cultures of nonprofits and higher education. Faculty and staff in higher education will learn ways to work with community partners in service opportunities. Nonprofit members will learn how to attain and maintain volunteers and work productively with available resources.

For more information on the conference, contact Irene Cretella by phone at (860)465-0090 or e-mail cretellai@easternct.edu.

 

Eastern's Martin Wins Jerry G. Gaff Faculty Award

Written by Emily Bonoyer

 

maggie martin.JPGWillimantic, CT -- Margaret Martin, executive assistant to the president for planning at Eastern Connecticut State University, will be awarded the Jerry G. Gaff Faculty Award for 2009 on Oct. 2 at the 49th Association for General and Liberal Studies (AGLS) conference in St. Louis, MO.

The Jerry G. Gaff Faculty Award is given annually to those who have demonstrated leadership on their campuses in the area of general and liberal education; who have shown evidence of outstanding teaching in general and liberal education courses; and who have a record of achievement in curriculum development, innovation, or implementation in general and liberal education. The award is named for Jerry Gaff, senior scholar at the American Association of Colleges and Universities and a respected advocate for general and liberal education for more than 30 years. 

Martin was nominated for her demonstrated leadership at Eastern in the area of general and liberal education. She earned her bachelor of arts degree in sociology at Emmanuel College; a master of science in social work from the George Warren Brown School of Social Work at Washington University in St. Louis; and her doctorate in social policy from Florence Heller School for Advanced Studies in Social Welfare Policy at Brandeis University.

 "During the two years of Liberal Arts Core development, Dr. Martin gained enormous respect from the Eastern faculty and administration, and especially from those of us who worked closely with her," said Charles Booth, general education program committee member and professor of biology, in his letter of nomination. "She is not a force to be reckoned with; rather, she is a consensus builder with a low-key, gently persuasive personality."

 "Dr. Martin spent hundreds and hundreds of hours and invested great intellectual and emotional energy in the development of Eastern's Liberal Arts Core," said Rhona Free, vice president for academic affairs in her letter of nomination. "She collaborated, coaxed, compromised and ultimately succeeded in gaining approval for a program that was much more innovative and ambitious than could have been hoped."

Martin has been on several committees at Eastern including the Committee on the Future of Eastern; the ad-hoc committee of the first-year program and student affairs; budget and resource allocation committee; peace and humans rights committee; committee on the liberal arts; and the minority recruitment and retention committee. She is also the chair of the liberal arts program committee and general education program committee.

 

Eastern Presents "Take Back the Night"

Written by Kate Harner

Willimantic, Conn. - The Women's Center at Eastern Connecticut State University will host its annual Take Back the Night march, rally and speak-out from 7 to 11 p.m. on Sept. 23. The public is invited. Admission is free.

Take Back the Night is a communitywide protest against sexual assault and violence. The event will start in Eastern's Student Center Theatre with a rally and speak-out at 7 p.m. Survivors of sexual assault will share their stories. Eastern President Elsa M. Núñez and the police department will address the rally. Afterward, a march around the campus and immediate community will take place at 8 p.m. The march will be followed by a reception and poetry performance by the Saltines in the Student Center Lobby and Student Center Theatre from 9 to 11 p.m.

Take Back the Night has inspired men and women to take a stand against violence and helped those who have been victims of sexual assault a chance to heal. For more information, contact the Women's Center at women-ctr@easternct.edu or (860)465-4313.

 

Mental Health Activist to Discuss Suicide Prevention

Written by Jack Meltzer

 

 

MALMON 9-14-09.jpgWillimantic, Conn. - Alison Malmon, founder of Active Minds, a nonprofit mental health advocacy group for young adults, will speak on Sept. 15 as Eastern Connecticut State University in observance of Suicide Prevention Week.  Malmon will lecture at 1 p.m. in the Student Center Theater.  The public is invited and admission is free.

Malmon started Active Minds in 2001 after her older brother, Brian, took his life while attending Columbia University in New York.  Realizing that few people were discussing mental health issues on campus, Malmon decided to combat the stigma of mental illness.

Since then Malmon has been featured on CNN and in the New York Times, the Boston Globe, the Chronicle of Higher Education and other publications.  Active Minds has more than 200 campus chapters across the United States. Malmon hopes to encourage students to seek help when they need it.

Last year, Gov. M. Jodi Rell declared the first week of September as Suicide Prevention Week in Connecticut.  Suicide is the second leading cause of death among college students. 

 

Journalist from Iraq War to Lecture at Eastern

Written by Dwight Bachman

 

 

Dahr Jamail image.JPGWillimantic, CT --  Journalist Dahr Jamail will speak on "Reinventing Journalism:  Thoughts of an Unembedded Reporter in Iraq," at 1 p.m. on Sept. 21. in the Betty R. Tipton Room of Eastern Connecticut State University's Student Center. Jamail's lecture is in honor of the United Nations International Day of Peace.  A reception and book signing will follow his presentation.

In advance of Jamail's talk, a screening of one of his films, "Eyewitness in Iraq:  An Unembedded Report," will be held from 7:30 to 8 p.m. on Sept. 16 in Room 110 of Webb Hall.

Dissatisfied with mainstream media coverage of the war in Iraq, Jamail decided to leave his job as a rescue ranger on Mount Denali in Alaska and headed to Iraq. He was determined to engage directly with Iraqis outside of the Green Zone to provide a different type of coverage that highlighted the human impact of this conflict. 

Since 2003, Jamail has provided coverage of the Iraqi people and of U.S. soldiers, bearing witness to the effects of the war on the lives of ordinary Iraqis, their security and well-being, and their access to important resources like clean water and health care. Jamail also lectures on the impact of the conflict upon U.S. soldiers and others, reporting on the incidence of post-traumatic stress disorder and acts of resistance by some soldiers. 

 

He reports to news organizations such as Inter Press Service and Le Monde Diplomatique; has appeared in and on numerous news media outlets, such as the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) and National Public Radio ( NPR); and been a frequent guest on college radio stations across America, including UCONN's FM.91.7 WHUS. 

Jamail has earned numerous awards for his independent work, including the prestigious 2008 Martha Gellhorn Award for Journalism, The Lannan Foundation Writing Residency Fellowship, the James Aronson Award for Social Justice Journalism, the Joe A. Callaway Award for Civic Courage and Project Censored awards.

For more information about Jamail's lecture, contact Political Science Professor Helma de Vries at devriesh@easternct.edu or call (860) 465-5091.

 

                                    CAPTION

                                    Dahr Jamail

 

Eastern's Fall Career Fair Set for Oct. 1

Written by Dwight Bachman

 

Willimantic, CT  --  The Office of Career Services at Eastern Connecticut State University will hold its annual fall Career Fair from 3 to 5 p.m. on Oct. 1 in the Betty R. Tipton Room of the Student Center, located on Eastern's north campus.

            Nearly 40 businesses, education, government and social service agencies will be on hand. "In this challenging and competitive job market, Eastern's liberally educated students and alumni remain in demand," said Nancy DeCrescenzo, director of career services at Eastern.  "The skills and knowledge they acquire in their four years make them strong candidates in all industries.  We are excited to be able to offer a job fair even in a down economy."

            For more information about Eastern's Fall Career Fair, visit the website at:

http://www.easternct.edu/career/documents/FallCareerFairInvite2009_000.pdf

 

Eastern Professor to Exhibit Work at ArtSpace

Written by Kate Harner

 

koalo bear in Australia.JPG

Stephanie Boccanfuso, a junior majoring in communications, pets a koala bear while on an art excursion in Australia with Professor Muriel Miller.

 

Willimantic, Conn. - Muriel Miller, part-time professor of visual arts at Eastern Connecticut State University, will present her exhibit, "Landscape Paintings in Plein Air," at the ArtSpace Gallery from Sept. 11 to 26. The opening reception will be held Sept. 11 from 5 to 8 p.m. at the gallery, located at 480 Main Street, Willimantic. Up for Classics, featuring Dennis Waring and Joe Casillo, will perform music. The public is invited. Admission is free.

Miller creates large-scale acrylic landscape paintings that incorporate expressionist color choice and an impressionist rendering of light and atmosphere. Her work expresses both the familiar and unfamiliar in paintings of northeastern Connecticut, where she is a resident, as well as observations of the landscapes she has encountered in her travels, such as Australia, England, Ireland and the National Parks of the West.

In May, Miller traveled to Australia with 16 Eastern students and Sylvia Halkin, associate professor of biology at Central Connecticut State University, in order to draw, paint and participate in field studies for 29 days. They explored areas such as Warrumbungle National Park, Lamington National Park and Kings Canyon. "I try to push beyond what I see to what I feel in expressing a reaction to a place," Miller says. "I am visually stimulated by landscapes that I have never seen before and I try to capture the uniqueness and spirit of a place with spontaneity that comes from painting plain air."

The gallery is open on Sept. 12, 19 and 26 from 1 to 4 p.m. or by appointment. Persons interested in making appointments for this exhibit should contact Miller at (860) 455-9918 or Murielmillerart@aol.com.

 

 

 

Eastern Professor Runs a Marathon to Fight Poverty

Written by Jack Meltzer

 

 

Chatterton Runs Marathon.JPGWillimantic, Conn. - Health and Physical Education Professor Charlie Chatterton ran a marathon on the Eastern Connecticut State University campus on Sept. 4 to raise public awareness about poverty in America.  Members of Eastern's men's lacrosse team took turns running the marathon with Chatterton, who has run 34 marathons across the nation since September 2006 to raise public awareness about poverty.  He wants to run 38 marathons by the end of the year. He picked 38 to honor the nearly 38 million Americans living in poverty in America.

            The University's new Center for Community Engagement (CCE) collected canned food items in support of Chatterton's campaign, and Eastern's Office of Institutional Advancement will match $1 for every canned item received.  All items will be donated to the Covenant Soup Kitchen's Food Pantry.

            "I hope that everyone becomes more engaged in their own communities, just as I continue to challenge myself to do, to make a positive difference in addressing poverty," said Chatterton.  Persons interested in supporting Chatterton should contact him at (860) 872-0081 or by e-mail at charliechatterton@sbcglobal.net  

 

Eastern Opens New Center for Community Engagement

Written by Jack Meltzer

 

  DeVivo 5194.jpg

  Tom DeVivo, president of the Windham Board of Selectmen, applauded the center's plans to work more closely with local schools and human services agencies.

 

 Willimantic, Conn. - More than 125 area residents, city officials, business leaders, nonprofit agency heads and other community partners were on hand on Sept. 8 to help Eastern Connecticut State University celebrate the opening of its new Center for Community Engagement (CCE).

Eastern President Elsa Nunez said the new center is designed to expand on Eastern's legacy of community service but will provide a new focus on service learning that will link Eastern students' classroom learning to their work in the community. "Our work will not take place in a vacuum," said Nunez. "We will work closely with our community partners to address important community concerns such as education, the environment, human services and the democratic process." 

In describing Eastern's 120-year history in Willimantic, Nunez cited several recent examples of students engaged in the community, including the pro bono graphic design work of Eastern visual arts students throughout Willimantic; energy audits that Eastern environmental science students have performed for hundreds of schools throughout Connecticut; and the work political science students did prior to the 2006 election to register more than 100 Latino residents who did not know they had the right to vote, just to name a few. 

Roger Adams, executive director of the Chamber of Commerce/Windham Region, congratulated Eastern on continuing its tradition of working within the local community with a new emphasis, and said the chamber has provided internships to 60 to 80 Eastern seniors over the past 31 years.

Tom DeVivo, president of the Windham Board of Selectmen, recalled going to kindergarten in Noble School, which was used for used for years as a lab school for Eastern's student teachers.  He applauded the center's plans to work more closely with local schools and human services agencies - "where the people are."

Eric Martin, associate professor of business administration, has worked closely with the town's leadership on the current Willimantic Whitewater Project. He said, "By institutionalizing service learning, we can better coordinate and assess our students' service to the community." 

Martin said Eastern was "a great stockpile of resources" and that faculty will now be able to use community opportunities in a smarter way. 

                                       CCE- Monica and.JPGAmeriCorps VISTA volunteers Monica Rochon '09 and Beth Zambrano work in Eastern's new Center for Community Engagement.

 

Monica Rochon '09, who now serves on the CCE's staff as a VISTA volunteer, talked about the Sisterhood project with Windham Public Schools for at-risk females being led by Health and Physical Education Professor Nanette Tummers. "Through this service learning, experience I was able to build trust with my little sister by showing up each week for our sessions, attending her volleyball games at Windham High School, and showing her that I genuinely cared about her aspirations. Just as I built trust with my mentee, the CCE is here to build trust with business owners and agencies in the community."

Jacqueline Bishop '12 first got involved with community service when her freshman roommate convinced her to attend the first meeting of a new student club, People Helping People.  This past Friday, this fast-growing student organization, dedicated to serving the local community, signed up more than 200 new student volunteers.  Bishop said there is "an abundance of interest" among Eastern students in helping the community.  To manage this level of interest, the club has developed six work teams around health care, education, the environment, politics, global issues and human services.  She also mentioned the Day of Giving and Town Wide/Town Pride as two annual events that energize the entire campus while making significant contributions to the local community.

 

CCE-Silcox 5300.jpg

Kim Silcox, interim director of the new Center for Community Engagement, speaks with Leigh Duffy, director of Health Care Access for Generations Health Care.

 

Kim Silcox, the CEE's interim director, wrapped up the celebration by noting that the creation of the CCE had grown out of the strategic planning process initiated three years ago by President Nunez.  She referenced two of Eastern's core values -- social responsibility and engagement -- and said that "Students now expect us to provide them with experiential learning opportunities."  Silcox indicated that with the help of Eastern's two VISTA volunteers, the peer support provided by the People Helping People student club, and the efforts of other CCE staff, Eastern students will now have the opportunity to "enhance their skills through applied learning projects." 

Silcox said "Service must become part of our student culture," and cited several examples of where this is already happening, ranging from the work of Professor Alex Citurs' students in creating a database for the Covenant Soup Kitchen, to a project involving English Professor Laura Rosenberg's students who are helping local businesses write business plans. 

 

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