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March 2009 Archives

"Lost in Translation" Returns to Eastern

Written by Ed Osborn

Willimantic, CT -- Following two successful "Lost in Translation" seminars in October 2007 and May 2008, Eastern Connecticut State University, the Windham Region Chamber of Commerce and Bauza & Associates of Hartford are hosting "Lost in Translation 3," a half-day conference being held on April 15.  The event is aimed at local and regional community leaders, including business people, civic leaders, school officials and other educators, small businesses, nonprofits, and service organizations. 

The free conference will convene at 8:30 a.m. with opening remarks, followed by two sets of concurrent breakout sessions at 9 a.m. and again at 10:30.  While the themes of bringing together Willimantic's mainstream and Latino communities and supporting local economic development continue, Lost in Translation 3 will focus on leveraging resources to build a sustainable community.  Breakout topics include services available to local small businesses; overcoming cultural differences in a multicultural environment; expanding relationships between the University and the community; and building a stronger support system for local schoolchildren.  Presenters will include representatives from Eastern, Bauza & Associates, the Windham Region Chamber of Commerce, and the Spanish American Merchants Association, as well as guest speaker Sean Bender, director of the Center for Community and Learning Partnerships at Wentworth Institute of Technology in Boston.

"We have had a wonderful response to our previous two Lost in Translation seminars," said Eastern President Elsa Núñez.  "Our local residents truly see Willimantic's rich multicultural history as an asset and not a barrier, and want to come together to ensure a sustainable future for our community.  I am especially interested in sharing ideas at Lost in Translation 3 on how we can focus the time, energy and talents of our faculty and students to address community needs while offering students unique, practical learning experiences."

A luncheon will close the event, with Bender providing the luncheon keynote address.  To RSVP, please call 465-5735 or e-mail rsvp@easternct.edu.

 

Eastern to present Gambling Awareness Week

Written by Emily Bonoyer

Willimantic, Conn. - In a recent study conducted by the Oregon Gambling Addiction Treatment Foundation, many pathological gamblers report having started gambling as early as age 10. In an effort to combat problem gambling, SWAG (Students Witnessing Addictions to Gambling) at Eastern Connecticut State University will host Gambling Awareness Week from March 31 to April 3. SWAG is a group of six social workers working to educate the Eastern community on the warning signs and issues of problem gambling. The public is invited. Admission is free.

On March 31 and April 2, "Free Hotdog Day" takes place from 2 to 4 p.m. on the lawn in front of Webb Hall.

Also on March 31, from 7 to 9 p.m., Lori Rugle, problem gambling services director for the Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services (DMHAS), will speak on problem gambling in Room 219 of the Student Center.

On April 1, at 7 - 9 p.m. "Pizza Movie Night" will be held in Room 219 of the Student Center. The movie "21" will be shown. Event organizers will also give away free food, t-shirts, and much more.

 

Eastern Names Winners of Ella T. Grasso Award

Written by Emily Bonoyer

 

Ella T. Grasso Award Winners.JPG

Winners of Eastern Connecticut State University's Ella T. Grasso Distinguished Service Award.  Left to right, Senator Edith Prague (D-19th District); Jennifer Paradis '11 of Rockville/Vernon; and Eastern English Professor Marcia McGowan.

 

A Eastern Connecticut State University student, a Connecticut state senator and the director of women's studies at Eastern were named the recipients of the University's first Ella T. Grasso Distinguished Service Award on March 18. The three were honored during a reception in the Paul E. Johnson Sr. Community Conference Room of Eastern's J. Eugene Smith Library. The award recognizes leaders who have made contributions towards advancing women's rights and issues of gender equality in memory of former Connecticut Governor Ella T. Grasso.

                        Sen. Edith Prague '65, who has represented the 19th Senate District since 1994, won the community award.  Prague is one of Connecticut's longest serving and most devoted public servants. A long time Columbia resident, she champions the causes of many under-represented groups. Prague has advocated for female correctional workers who were victims of sexual harassment; advocated on behalf of workers, primarily female, who suffered from sick building syndrome; and led the fight against creating a toxic landfill in Franklin.

            Prague has also been a regular guest speaker at Eastern and a tireless advocate for the mission of the University. She has been named the recipient of numerous awards, including Yale University's Outstanding Currently-Elected Woman; the National Organization of Women's (NOW) Alice Paul Award; the Eleanor Roosevelt Humanities Award; and has been recognized for her service by the American Association of University Women (AAUW).

            Eastern President Elsa Núñez called Prague "a mover and a shaker" and said protecting women's right is fundamental to Eastern's core values. Jean de Smet, first selectmen of the Town of Windham/Willimantic, delivered the keynote address at the ceremony.  She encouraged the audience to become more engaged in the governance process            .

Prague remembered Grasso as "a woman with a mission," and said, "I am so moved to receive this award.  This is one of the proudest days of my life."

                        English Professor Marcia McGowan is affectionately called one of Eastern's "feminist founding mothers" for her help in establishing the university's Women's Studies Department and Women's Center. From 1979 to 1981, McGowan worked on a Title XX grant for the development of the Women's Studies minor. She has directed the program for more than 20 years, making it a visible part of Eastern's academic landscape, helping students and faculty to explore and gender issues such as female image and identity, women and war, family issues, lesbian culture, minority women, women in education, women in the workplace, women and violence and others.  She is currently working to help revise the University's sexual harassment policy.

            As a recognized scholar of feminist criticism, pedagogy, women writers and women's studies, McGowan has frequently served on panels at major literacy conferences such as the Twentieth Century Literature Conference, held at the University of Louisville. At Yale University, where she held a Visiting Faculty Fellowship (1994-95), she was honored for her work about Pulitzer Prize-winning Author Edith Wharton.

Eastern's Women's Center is now more than 30 years old. McGowan's significant book donations to the center's library have enhanced its collection and expanded the minds of those seeking knowledge of women's issues. Her support of Women's Center programs has had an immeasurable impact on the lives of students. Political Science Professor Nicole Krassas said McGowan" "quiet persistence, authority and knowledge" make her "a national advocate for women's rights."

McGowan thanked Núñez for instituting the award and said there are many social issues - sexual harassment, gender equality, race, economic/income disparity - that have not been resolved and remain major concern, especially for poor women and women of color.

            Sociology major Jennifer Paradis, '11 of Vernon/Rockville, won the student award. Paradis has assumed a number of leadership roles in programs and organizations on campus, focusing on outreach and advocacy of women's issues and gender equality. She is a founding member and current vice president of Eastern's Lesbian Gay Straight Student Alliance (LGBT).   

            Paradis also help organize Eastern's Student Government Association's 2008 voter registration and polling place shuttle vans in 2008, and actively canvassing throughout New England for a political action committee that focuses on women's health issues. Paradis also chairs the Student Government's budget and management committee, works part time in the Office of Career Services, and still finds time to speak to student groups across Connecticut about women's issues and equality.

Paradis is also an intern with Planned Parenthood of Connecticut, helping to provide outreach and education on support services, and works on issues ranging from women's reproductive rights to AIDS awareness. Paradis said, "I look at Senator Prague and Dr. McGowan and I say to myself, 'I want to do what they do."  I want to do this throughout my life.

Eastern to Host Latino Student Leadership Conference

Written by Este Yarmosh

Willimantic, Conn. - Eastern Connecticut State University will host the Seventh Annual New England Latino Student Leadership Conference on April 3 and 4.   The two-day conference will begin on April 3 at 5:30 p.m. in the Betty R. Tipton Room of the Student Center.  Eastern President Elsa Núñez will deliver the keynote address.  The conference will continue with a career fair at 9 a.m. on April 4, outside the Student Center Café. 

 More than 300 Latino college students from across New England are expected to attend.  The theme of the conference is "Five Steps for Success."  The conference is designed to encourage connections among Latino college student leaders in New England; showcase practical, progressive approaches in leadership development through workshops and panel discussions; and provide opportunities to network professionally and socially.

"We are very excited to be hosting this conference," said Michael Piña, vice president of Eastern's Student Government Association.

The leadership conference was started in 2003 at Brown University by Salvador Mena, an administrator at Brown, in an effort to connect Latino college students with their school and home communities.   Eastern hosted the conference in 2004.

For more information, visit www.latinoleadershipconference.org.

 

Eastern Honors "Norwich Nine" in Student-Run Play

Written by Allison Kelly

Willimantic, Conn. - "The Norwich Nine," a play written, produced and performed by Eastern Connecticut State University students, will be performed at 7 p.m. on April 19 in Eastern's Student Center Theatre. "The Norwich Nine" tells the story of nine Norwich men who fought in the Civil War, died at the Andersonville Prisoner of War camp in Andersonville, GA, and whose bodies were returned for burial with honors in the Yantic Cemetery in Norwich.

"The Norwich Nine" is part of a series of university events created to celebrate the bicentennial of Abraham Lincoln's birth. 

 

Eastern to Present "The Supermarket"

Written by Ed Osborn

 

Willimantic, Conn. - A high quality, low budget film about small town Connecticut will be on display when Eastern Connecticut State University presents a free screening of the film, "The Supermarket," at 7 p.m. on March 19 and April 1 in the Student Center Theatre.  The public is invited.

The film chronicles the life and death of the family-owned Ellington Supermarket. The film was produced and directed by a group of young friends who worked at the supermarket as it came under the threat of shutting down because a new Big Y chain store was coming to town.  The store, a fixture in town for nearly 20 years, eventually closed in 2006 with the opening of the Big Y.

The movies was shot on location in 2005 and celebrates the small-town spirit of Ellington. Tim Norman, a 21-year-old Ellington resident who directed the film, told a reporter, "The concept of the farms and forest that made Ellington what it is, falling before the forces of progress, is very important to us. It's a film about the frustration that one feels over being powerless to halt these changes." 

Norman said the film brings the old Ellington back to life. In the film, Ellington residents talk about how commercialization crushed the small town feeling. Matt Jenkins, another former employee at the Ellington Supermarket, produced the film with Dave Therrien.  Everyone involved with the film either worked at the store or went to Ellington High School. Many had planned on working at the supermarket for the rest of their lives, but in the end, their small-town grocery store is just a memory.

 

Sol LeWitt Wall Drawing to Come to Eastern's Akus Gallery

Written by Allison Kelly

Willimantic, CT. - Eastern Connecticut State University will introduce the Sol LeWitt mural, "Wall Drawing 978," at a reception from 5 to 7 p.m. on April 9 in the Julian Akus Gallery. The gallery is located in Shafer Hall, at the corner of Windham and Valley Streets in Willimantic. The public is invited. Admission is free.

The reception formally opens the exhibition, "Taking Shape:  Selections from the Collection of Eastern Connecticut State University," which runs from March 19 through May 7, and will include "Shape Up!", an interactive area for preschool children.

            "Wall Drawing 978" will make its U.S. debut at Eastern; it was first installed in June 2001 in the Academie de France à Rome in the Villa Medici in Rome. A conceptual piece for which a simple diagram was drawn, the mural will come to life at the gallery when one of LeWitt's trained assistants creates it to specifications from The LeWitt Estate. 

From March 30 through April 3, during which time the gallery will be open to the public, Jesse Good, LeWitt assistant, and four Eastern Visual Arts students - Christina Ciacci, Hanna Shea, Patrick Donahue and Katherine Riotte - will paint the acrylic mural of a vibrant blue pyramid on a field of red.  This work is on loan to Eastern courtesy of the Estate of Sol LeWitt.

            Also included in "Taking Shape" are selections from Eastern's permanent collection including screenprints by Ilya Bolotowsky and Manuel Facal; ceramic macquettes by Dorothy Mayhall; and the Sol LeWitt, "Pyramid #5," 1986, a sculpture gifted by the artist to Eastern in 1993.

            The Akus Gallery collaborated with Eastern's Child and Family Development Resource Center to present "Shape Up!," a fun corner for the preschool set.  Children ages 2 to 5 find and identify shapes and colors in the exhibition and create geometric designs.  Please call the gallery for more information or to schedule school group visits.

The Julian Akus Gallery hours are 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesdays and Wednesdays; 1 to 7 p.m. on Thursday; and 2 to 5 p.m. on Saturdays and Sundays. The gallery is closed Mondays and Fridays; Special open hours are 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Monday, March 30 and Friday, April 3 during the execution of the LeWitt mural.  Parking is available on both cross streets.  The gallery is fully accessible.  For more information regarding this and other exhibitions at Akus Gallery, please call the Akus Gallery at (860) 465-4659 or visit the web site: http://akusgallery.easternct.edu

 

Eastern Opens New Veterans Center

Written by Allison Kelly

Willimantic, Conn. - Eastern Connecticut State University will open its new Veterans Education and Transition Services (VETS) Center from 1 to 3 p.m. on March 19.   The ceremony will take place in Room 200 of the Alvin B. Wood Support Services Center. A reception will follow the ceremony.

 The VETS Center, designed to meet the educational and transitional needs of veterans at Eastern, is staffed by veteran and non-veteran student workers. The Center provides a space for veterans to relax, socialize and use computers to access the resources available about Veterans Administration benefits and services.

"The center familiarizes veterans with student activities and helps acclimate them to an academic atmosphere," said Caleb Diebolt '09, student veteran and program coordinator for the VETS Center. Senior Rebecca Shea, a veteran and office assistant in the VETS Center, agreed. "It is nice to have a place where you feel welcome." 

For more information about Eastern's new VETS Center, call (860) 465-0402.

 

Eastern Professor Wins Connecticut State University Top Research Award

 Written by Allison Kelly

Dennis Canterbury in Ghana, West Africa.JPG

 Professor Dennis Canterbury (lime green shirt; fourth from the right in back row) poses  with his graduate students at the University of cape Coast in Ghana.

 

Willimantic, Conn. - Dennis Canterbury, associate professor in the department of sociology, anthropology and social work, has been named the recipient of the Connecticut State University (CSUS) Trustees Research Award for 2009. Wendi Everton, associate professor in the department of psychology, won a university-level Trustee Award honoring her teaching. The awards were presented by the CSUS Board of Trustees during its meeting on March 12 at Central Connecticut State University in New Britain. 

Canterbury was honored for his contributions in advancing the field of sociology related to development and globalization, Dennis Canterbury Classroom Candid.JPGencompassing issues of sustainable development, good governance, African and Caribbean development and development theory, alternative development theory, neoliberal globalization and international economic partnerships. Three other CSUS scholars received university-level Trustees Awards in recognition of the caliber of their research, one for each of the other universities in the CSUS System.

Everton was recognized for her teaching innovation, effective instructional approaches and research supervision, and for her continuous participation in collegial work, including curriculum development and the enhancement of teaching. She was one of four CSUS professors, one per university, to receive a teaching award.  

"The quality of teaching and level of research throughout the university system is truly remarkable, and the scholarship by these faculty members is both inspiring and significant," said Board Chairman Lawrence D. McHugh.

"These awards provide a means of recognizing the exemplary work of the highest promise being done by our up-and-coming faculty. They are all demonstrating an impact on their academic field, our students and our state," added John A. Doyle, chair of the Trustees' Academic Affairs Committee. 

"I am very proud of Professors Canterbury and Everton for receiving the CSU Board of Trustees research and teaching awards this year," said Eastern President Elsa Núñez. "The scholarly work and impassioned teaching they perform each day make them very worthy of these awards.  To win the statewide award in research is a double honor for Dr. Canterbury, attesting to the field research he has done in the Caribbean and West Africa in the areas of labor, political economics and development.  Both these professors empower their students to think critically and engage in the spirited discourse needed to maintain our democracy, which is the foundation of a liberal arts education at Eastern." 

CSUS faculty who have "distinguished themselves as outstanding teachers for at least five years and have a minimum of two years track record of promoting instructional improvements for their programs or departments are eligible for the Trustees Teaching Award." The Trustees Research Award can be granted to faculty who are conducting "research work of exceptional promise."  Nominees are expected to demonstrate substantive contributions or achievements and scholarly activities in their academic field of study during the past five years. Each of the recipients' universities will receive an award of $1,000, with the system-level recipient receiving an additional $1,000 award for their university.  

Four Eastern Students Win CT Review Prizes

Written by Este Yarmosh

Willimantic, Conn. - Four Eastern Connecticut State University students are the recipients of awards in fiction, non-fiction and poetry from the Connecticut Review, a literary and arts journal published semi-annually by the Connecticut State University System.  Junior Kendall Smith, a history major, won the Leslie Leeds Poetry Prize for "The Forgotten Unmoving."  English major Jennifer Kanyock '09 won the Essay Contest for "Hair, in Three Vignettes."  Junior Andrew Garaventa and Geoffrey Weldon '09 obtained honorable mentions in the fiction and poetry categories.     

"The fact that four of Eastern's undergraduate writers were recognized in this contest is an outstanding accomplishment," said Eastern English Professor Meredith Clermont-Ferrand.  "It speaks to the exceptional talent of our creative writing teachers as well as the dedication of our students.   Our mission at Connecticut Review is to produce a journal that functions as a pedagogical tool that inspires student creative expression while showcasing the high level of talent CSU schools produce through their rigorous Liberal Arts education."

Winners of each writing category will be published in the spring 2009 edition of the Connecticut Review.  For the first time in the Connecticut State University System (CSUS) Writing Conference history, all winners and honorable mentions will have the opportunity to read their work at the CSU Writing Conference which will be held at Central Connecticut State University on March 14.  The conference is free and Eastern students, faculty and administration are invited to attend. 

 

"Impact of Television on Young Children" Discussion to be Held at Eastern

Written by Allison Kelly

Willimantic, Conn. - Lisa Guernsey, former New York Times education and technology reporter, will discuss the effect of television on children at 3 p.m. on April 1 in Eastern Connecticut State University's Student Center Theatre. Guernsey will discuss the findings of her book, "Into the Minds of Babes: How Screen Time Affects Children from Birth to Age Five." Research for her book was compiled from visits to child research laboratories across the country.

Using examples from popular shows such as "Dora the Explorer," Guernsey's discussion will explore the age at which children begin showing evidence of learning from what they see on screen; the impact of television on language and other areas of development; the surprising impact of background television; and how parents and early childhood providers can make informed decisions about screen time.

 

Noted Poet Jeffrey Thomson to Read at Eastern

Written by Este Yarmosh

 

Willimantic, Conn. - Poet Jeffrey Thomson will read from his work on March 18 at 4 p.m. in Room 301 of the Science Building at Eastern Connecticut State University.  He has written the poetry collections "The Halo Brace," "Renovation," "The Country of Lost Sons," and most recently "Birdwatching in Wartime."

  Thomson is also the author of two art books, "Celestial Emporium of Benevolent Knowledge" and "Blind Desire," as well as a poetry anthology titled "From the Fishouse."  He holds both his Master of Arts in English and Creative Writing and Ph.D. in Creative Writing from the University of Missouri.  Thomson's work has appeared in numerous literary journals, including the "Sycamore Review," "Indiana Review," and "Gulf Coast."  He is the recipient of several fellowships such as a 2005 Literature Fellowship in Poetry from the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA), a 2006 Creative Artists Fellowship in Literature from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, and the 2008 Fellowship in the Literary Arts from the Maine Arts Commission.  Thomson is an associate professor of creative writing at the University of Maine at Farmington.

 

Eastern Set to Observe Latin American Awareness Month

Written by Este Yarmosh

 

Spanish Harlem Orchestra.JPGWillimantic, Conn. - Eastern Connecticut State University will celebrate Latin American Awareness Month in April with several events, including an evening of Latin American storytelling and food tasting, a performance by the Spanish Harlem Orchestra and a drama production titled "Plantanos and Collard Greens."  The public is invited.  Admission is free for all events except the presentation by the Spanish Harlem Orchestra. Tickets to the Spanish Harlem Orchestra performance are $10 for the general public and can be reserved at (860) 465-0036 or at tickets@easternct.edu.  For more information about the orchestra, visit www.spanishharlemorchestra.net. 

            The Spanish Harlem Orchestra will perform on April 2 at 7 p.m. in Shafer Auditorium.  The orchestra's visit is sponsored by Eastern's Arts and Lectures Series committee.

            On April 7, a Latin American storytelling and food tasting event will take place in the Intercultural Center at 6 p.m.  Latin American students, faculty and staff will relate stories from their personal lives.  President Nuñez will be one of the featured storytellers. 

            On April 9 at 4 p.m. in the Student Center Café, performance artist Maria Aponte will present "Lagrimas De Mis Madres" and "I Will Not be Silenced."  She will be accompanied by percussionist Cacho Ramirez.   "I Will Not be Silenced" is based on Sor Juna Ines de la Cruz, a nun from 17th century Mexico who wrote poetry and musical compositions and who also spoke out on the need for women's education.

            At noon, on April 22 in the President's Dining Room in Hurley Hall, Carlos Ojeda will conduct a teaching excellence seminar.  Ojeda will share methods designed to involve and inspire Latino students.  At 3 p.m., Ojeda will host a student forum in the Student Center Theatre featuring the topic, "My Friends Called Me Chu," an engaging and emotional story of one student's journey through life, loss and his experience in the urban educational system.  It begins with the student being "just another statistic" on the streets of Newark, NJ, and depicts the student later becoming a published poet, educator, speaker and entrepreneur. 

            At 6 p.m., on April 22, Eastern will present its Latin American Distinguished Service Awards in the Paul E. Johnson Sr. Community Conference Room of the J. Eugene Smith Library.  These awards recognize members of the campus and community-at-large whose actions demonstrate distinguished service to the Latino community.  Ojeda will deliver the keynote address, and the Gaza Latin Band will provide music.      

              On April 27, Eastern's Intercultural Center and chapter of the Organization of Latin American Students (OLAS) will present "Plantanos and Collard Greens," a drama production that has successfully played in New York and to universities around the nation.  It is about an African American man named Freeman and a Latino woman named Angelita who fall in love and deal with racial and cultural prejudices, including those of their family and friends; all the while striving to maintain their love in the face of these obstacles.  (Location and time TBA)

            On April 28 at 11 a.m., the Intercultural Center and Campus Activity Board (CAB) will sponsor a Latin American Cultural Fair on the Student Center Patio.  The fair is an Island Fest with a Latin American theme, featuring Latin American food and live Latin entertainment. 

 

Spanish Harlem Orchestra to Perform at Eastern

Written by Este Yarmosh

Willimantic, Conn. - The Spanish Harlem Orchestra will perform at Eastern Connecticut State University on April 2 at 7 p.m. in the Shafer Hall Auditorium, located at the corner of Windham and Valley Streets in Willimantic.  The performance is the final event in Eastern's 2008-09 Arts and Lectures Series program. 

Formed in 2000 by producer Aaron Levinson, the Spanish Harlem Orchestra consists of 13 members, including vocalist Ray De La Paz; bassist Maximo Rodriguez; and percussionist George Delgado.  The orchestra is led by Oscar Hernández, noted pianist, arranger and producer.   Its specialty musical style is "salsa dura" or heavy salsa. "We want to keep it alive while educating new generations and music lovers in general on the true musical roots of our culture," said Hernández.

The orchestra has been nominated for Grammys twice - for its 2002 album, "Un Gran Día En El Barrio," and most recently, for its 2008 album, "United We Swing," in the Best Tropical Album category.  The Spanish Harlem Orchestra won a Grammy in 2005 for the album "Across 110th St." 

Tickets to the performance are $10 for the general public and can be reserved at (860) 465-0036 or at tickets@easternct.edu.  For more information about the Orchestra, visit www.spanishharlemorchestra.net.  

 

Ella Grasso Service Award Ceremony and Reception at Eastern

Written by Allison Kelly

Willimantic, Conn. - Recipients of Eastern Connecticut State University's newly established Ella T. Grasso Distinguished Service Award will be honored in a ceremony at 6 p.m. on March 18 in the Paul E. Johnson Sr. Community Conference Room in the J. Eugene Smith Library. A reception will be held following the ceremony. The public is invited. Admission is free.

Recipients of the award include students, faculty, staff and community leaders whose efforts have helped advance the rights of women and the fight to end gender inequality.

 

Eastern to Present "The Supermarket"

Written by Dwight Bachman

Willimantic, Conn. - A high quality, low budget film about small town Connecticut will be on display when Eastern Connecticut State University presents a free screening of the film, "The Supermarket," at 7 p.m. on March 19 and April 1 in the Student Center Theatre.  The public is invited.

The film chronicles the life and death of the family-owned Ellington Supermarket. The film was produced and directed by a group of young friends who worked at the supermarket as it came under the threat of shutting down because a new Big Y chain store was coming to town.  The store, a fixture in town for nearly 20 years, eventually closed in 2006 with the opening of the Big Y.

The movies was shot on location in 2005 and celebrates the small-town spirit of Ellington. Tim Norman, a 21-year-old Ellington resident who directed the film, told a reporter, "The concept of the farms and forest that made Ellington what it is, falling before the forces of progress, is very important to us. It's a film about the frustration that one feels over being powerless to halt these changes." 

Norman said the film brings the old Ellington back to life. In the film, Ellington residents talk about how commercialization crushed the small town feeling. Matt Jenkins, another former employee at the Ellington Supermarket, produced the film with Dave Therrien.  Everyone involved with the film either worked at the store or went to Ellington High School. Many had planned on working at the supermarket for the rest of their lives, but in the end, their small-town grocery store is just a memory.

 

Art Professor's Project Gets "Standing Ovation"

Written by Este Yarmosh

 

Willimantic, Conn. - A public art project designed by Eastern Connecticut State University Art Professor June Bisantz titled "Standing Ovation" has been installed at 58 Renne Avenue in Pittsfield, MA.  "Standing Ovation" is a customized pedestrian crossing button that generates a thunderous round of applause when pushed.  The button will be applauding the public through 2010.

"Standing Ovation" is intended to stimulate awareness, engagement and laughter while delivering a serious message about the power of creative action to lift spirits, inspire curiosity and connect people to their environment and each other.  Although it appears to be a "normal" pedestrian crossing button at first glance, the "Standing Ovation" applause button offers an enthusiastic and life-affirming experience outside the norm, transforming public space into a personalized, interactive environment.

"My vision for this piece is to make people smile, to brighten their day and release their positive energy into the community and ultimately into the world," said Bisantz. "This project reflects my fundamental understanding of why art exists - to defy expectations, lead the way, bring us joy and remind us that we are not alone."

In fall 2008, the ArtScape Committee in Pittsfield commissioned Bisantz to install her "Standing Ovation" applause button as part of its "2009-10 ArtScape," an ongoing public art initiative sponsored by Pittsfield's Cultural Council and the Lichtenstein Center for the Arts.  Bisantz plans to bring "Standing Ovation" to Connecticut in 2010.

            Bisantz teaches digital art and design at Eastern. She received a Master of Fine Arts degree in painting from Claremont Graduate University in California.  Her work as a commercial artist and illustrator has appeared in Esquire and Vanity Fair magazines, and her paintings, collages and multimedia pieces have been shown in galleries and museums nationally and internationally, including the Discovery Museum in Bridgeport, the Benton Museum, University of Connecticut, the Copley Society of Art in Boston and Gallerie Alexi in Budapest. Since 1999, Bisantz has been the recipient of grant funding to support her public projects, including fellowships from the Connecticut Commission on Culture and Tourism, Connecticut State University research grants, and grants from the Te Women's Foundation. Bisantz is also a musician and has co-produced several collections of original jazz, all of which have received national recognition.

 

Human Rights Activist to Speak About Genocide in Darfur

Written by Emily Bonoyer

Willimantic, Conn. - Australian human rights activist, writer and lawyer Rebecca Hamilton will speak on the topic, "Every Person Counts: Citizen Action Against Genocide in Darfur," on March 9 at 2 p.m. in Room 104 of the Science Building at Eastern Connecticut State University. A reception will follow the speech. The public is invited. Admission is free.

Hamilton, a Genocide Intervention Network and Open Society Fellow, most recently served as special assistant to the prosecutor at the International Criminal Court in The Hague. In 2007, she was selected as a global young leader on genocide prevention. A Knox fellow and graduate of Harvard Law School and the John F. Kennedy School of Government, Hamilton also was managing editor of the Harvard Journal of Human Rights. She served as co-founder of the Darfur Action Group at Harvard, which mobilizes students to condemn the genocide occurring in Sudan and demands the U.S. government do the same. The group was involved in Harvard's precedent-setting decision to divest from companies supporting the Sudanese government.

Before starting law school, Hamilton worked in Sudan, where she executed a plan to help thousands of internally displaced persons return to their homes. Her writing on advocacy against mass atrocity has appeared in the International Herald Tribune, Boston Globe, and Sydney Morning Herald, as well as in Alex de Waal's book, "War in Darfur and the Search for Peace."

Hamilton's speech is presented in conjunction with the Carl Lutz Holocaust Exhibit, sponsored by Eastern's departments of History; Political Science, Philosophy and Geography; Sociology; Anthropology; and Social Work

 

Third Wave Feminists Chart Course at Eastern

Written by Allison Kelly

Willimantic, Conn. -The Women's Center at Eastern Connecticut State University will host a panel discussion, "Third Wave Feminists: Charting Our Course," at 3:30 p.m. on March 31 in the Student Center Theatre. The presentation will address the challenges of women in their 20s and 30s.

Third Wave Feminists emerged after the First Wave Feminists of the early 20th century struggled to obtain voting privileges for women and Second Wave Feminists of the 1960s and 1970s challenged the reproductive rights and role changes of women in socie

Professor to Lecture on "Man's Inhumanity to Man"

Written by Allison Kelly

Willimantic, Conn. - Manoug Manougian, professor of mathematics at the University of South Florida, will lecture on the topic, "Man's Inhumanity to Man," a discussion that will examine the history and effects of genocide as shown in Manougian's PBS documentary, "The Genocide Factor." The presentation will take place at 3 p.m. on March 18 in the Betty R. Tipton Room located in the Student Center at Eastern Connecticut State University.

Manougian will discuss "The Genocide Convention," a pact that encourages national leaders to prevent and punish actions of genocide in war and in peacetime. Manougian will also talk about what to do about apathy and political expediency.

Manougian served as the Mathematics department chair at the University of Southern Florida from 1974-1984. He has written and published math textbooks used in universities across the country. "The Genocide Factor," won the 2002 Gold Special Jury Award at the Houston International Film Festival.

 

"Women's Power" Film and Discussion at Eastern

Written by Allison Kelly

Willimantic, Conn. - In honor of Women's History Month, the film, "Women's Power," will be shown and discussed at 3:30 p.m. on March 17 in the Student Center Theatre at Eastern Connecticut State University.

"Women's Power," directed by Max Dashu, provides a panoramic view of female leadership, creativity, wisdom and courage spanning thousands of years. The film also looks at female spheres of influence in politics, economics, religion, medicine and the arts. Throughout the film, Dashu weaves a rich a tapestry of women, famous and anonymous, ancient and modern.

 

U.S. International Trade Commissioner to Speak at Eastern

Written by Emily Bonoyer

pinkert cfdrc dentist lutz-media our voices mlk awards 050.jpg    Rhona Free, vice president for academic affairs, present a sweatshirt to U.S. International Trade Commissioner during a luncheon in his honor after his presentation to Eastern students, faculty and staff.

        Willimantic, Conn. - Dean Pinkert, a member of the U.S. International Trade Commission, will speak at Eastern Connecticut State University on March 5 on the topic, "The U.S. and World Trade Challenges." Pinkert's presentation, sponsored by Eastern's David T. Chase Free Enterprise Institute, begins at 11 a.m. in the Paul E. Johnson Sr. Community Conference Room of the J. Eugene Smith Library.

            Prior to his appointment as commissioner, Pinkert was a senior attorney in the Office of the Chief Counsel for Import Administration at the U.S. Department of Commerce. During his tenure in the Commerce Department, Pinkert served as the trade and judiciary counsel to U.S. Sen. Robert Byrd (D-WV). From 1998 through 2000, Pinkert was a senior associate in the litigation and trade group of King and Spalding in Washington, D.C., where he represented U.S. companies in antidumping and countervailing duty investigations.

            Pinkert holds a Bachelor of Arts degree with high honors from Oberlin College; a Juris Doctor degree with honors from the University of Texas School of Law; and a Master of Laws degree with merit from the London School of Economics and Political Science.

 

 

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