Congratulations to last Spring 2017 seminar paper winners

Congratulations to the authors of the best seminar papers in Spring 2017:  

Joseph DeMarco for his work on Jefferson, Adams, and the Question of Tripoli.

Joe DeMarco with award

Joe DeMarco with award

And, Adam Murphy for “A Professor’s Experience in Indonesia: Examining the Partnership Between University of Kentucky and Bogor Agricultural College, 1957-1966.”

Adam Murphy with award

Adam Murphy with award

 

 

Welcome Warriors of History

Before classes started last week, the History department welcomed new History majors to the fold. There was food and drink, and we all learned some valuable lessons about chronology. And one or two things about the program as well.

As the History department’s chronicler, I provide the following photographic evidence for posterity:

Dr. Kamola makes a key point, explaining the Timeline Game (patent pending)

Dr. Kamola administers the pledge to not cheat during The Timeline Game (patent pending)

Action Shot

Professors proctoring the process

Good thing someone thought to bring a dolly for this shot of new majors comparing notes: "When was the battle of Hastings?"

Good thing someone thought to bring a dolly for this shot of new majors comparing notes: “When was the battle of Hastings???”

 

 

Belated Congratulations

To graduating senior Isabelli Rossi, who won a library research award in the Junior/Senior category with her research on “The Elite Opulence of the Guilded Age: Creation of an 1876 Style Evening Gown.”

And congrats as well to Chris Morris, who presented his paper “Got a Donkey in the Crosshairs: The Partisan Anticommunism of Senator Joseph McCarthy” at the Northeast Regional Honors Council Conference in late April.

The Dreaded Question

The question all graduating college students are forced to answer, again and again: “So what are you going to do now?”

Hopefully you’ve been thinking about this question before your last semester in school, but if you need some additional food for thought, there’s a new article on History degrees and careers in the April 2017 issue of American Historical Association’s Perspectives on History magazine (here). Appropriately enough, it takes a historical approach by looking at what careers past History majors have pursued.

So read the article and do what History trains you to do: identify its conclusion, assess its supporting evidence, analyze its assumptions and inferences, and contextualize the information within its broader geographical and chronological contexts. Once you’ve done that, you’ll be in better shape to figure out how you can combine your interests, content knowledge, and skills to find a job you’ll like doing. And remember, History faculty are here to help.

And what would a blog post be without an eye-catching graphic?

More undergraduate research

Eastern History majors have multiple venues in which to show off their research chops. Just a few weeks after the CSU Making History conference, more History majors presented their papers and posters at Eastern’s annual CREATE conference.

What Goes Up Must Come Down? Sarah Brihan presents on the artistic undermining of the Berlin Wall

What Goes Up Must Come Down? Sarah Brihan presents on the artistic undermining of the Berlin Wall

Isabella Rossi presents her period dress as part of her paper, “The Elite Opulence of the Gilded Age: Creation of an 1876 Style Evening Gown.”

Isabella Rossi presents her period dress as part of her paper, “The Elite Opulence of the Gilded Age: Creation of an 1876 Style Evening Gown.”

Joseph White presents his paper, “The Foul Blot of Everlasting Shame: Why 18th Century American Patriots Told the Story of Benedict Arnold.”

Joseph White presents his paper, “The Foul Blot of Everlasting Shame: Why 18th Century American Patriots Told the Story of Benedict Arnold.”

Rosie Welles presents her paper, “‘The Mythic Rapist’: Destructive Sexual Dehumanization of Black Men in the New South.”

Rosie Welles presents her paper, “‘The Mythic Rapist’: Destructive Sexual Dehumanization of Black Men in the New South.”

Patrick Thompson explains his poster session, “Love is Love: The Rise and Fall of the Defense of Marriage Act.”

Patrick Thomson explains his poster session, “Love is Love: The Rise and Fall of the Defense of Marriage Act.”

Jaky Ray presents her poster session, “Samson Occom.”

Jaky Ray presents her poster session, “Samson Occom.”

Prof. Thomas Balcerski with student Rosie Wells; Prof. Scott Moore with student Joseph White.

Prof. Thomas Balcerski with student Rosie Wells; Prof. Scott Moore with student Joseph White.

Public History opportunity, ye mateys!

For those interested in public history, you might consider checking out Discovering Amistad (http://discoveringamistad.org), a non-profit organization that is dedicated to providing education on its tall ship, the Amistad, and in Connecticut classrooms. The mission of Discovering Amistad is for CT students and adults to learn about the history of the Amistad, and to explore themes that extend its story to the present day, including legal and social justice.

Discovering Amistad is looking for individuals to serve as educators, on board and in the classroom. Educators should have a knowledge of American history and be able to lead discussions of students of all grade levels on contemporary issues concerning race and justice. Some background in education is essential: college graduates, education students and retired teachers are encouraged to apply.

For additional information, as well as application materials, contact Discovering Amistad Education Committee co-chairs Stephen Armstrong or Bob King.