Eastern History at the Benton Museum of Art

On Friday, September 9, 2016, students and faculty from the History Department attended the opening of the new exhibit, “Presidential Campaigning Over the Decades: The Mark and Rosalind Shankman Collection of American Political Flags and Textiles,” at the William Benton Museum of Art on the University of Connecticut, Storrs campus.  Professors Joan Meznar and Thomas Balcerski joined History majors McKenzie Korte and Sara Dean for the opening of the exhibit and the moderated panel discussion: “Presidential Campaigning Over the Decades: The 2016 Presidential Election in Historical Context.”  The exhibit, which features campaign flags from the era of George Washington through Teddy Roosevelt, will be on view through December 18, 2016.  For more information, please see the museum website at http://benton.uconn.edu

Professors Meznar and Balcerski and History majors McKenzie Korte and Sara Dean pose for the camera with in front of the 1856 election presidential banner promoting Democrat James Buchanan and running mate John C. Breckinridge, on display at the William Benton Museum of Art at the University of Connecticut.

Professors Meznar and Balcerski and History majors McKenzie Korte and Sara Dean pose for the camera in front of the 1856 election presidential banner promoting Democrat James Buchanan and running mate John C. Breckinridge, on display at the William Benton Museum of Art at the University of Connecticut.

History Major Allison Grant Reflects on her study abroad (and you can too)

I have always had a strong desire to travel. I knew from the moment I started applying to colleges, I would study abroad. Last Spring, I had the opportunity to study abroad. Through a partnership with Central Connecticut State University, I applied to the National University of Ireland-Galway.

Some of the courses I took included: Development of the Medieval Castle in Europe, Theories of Personality, and a Service Learning Literacy Project. Most of the classes fulfilled my Social Science Core.

The classes in Ireland were very different from the classes at Eastern, most of the classes had only two assignments for the whole semester, attendance was not always recorded, and most classes consisted of fifty to seventy students in them. Almost all the students use a laptop during class.

When I left for Ireland, I expected to spend all of my time in Ireland. I did not. I went to Copenhagen (Denmark), London (United Kingdom), Berlin (Germany), Italy (starting from Venice traveled down to Sicily), Athens (Greece), and Amsterdam (the Netherlands). There are so many great memories I have from this trip. I learned so much. Not just from classes but more from meeting people.

There are moments you wish you could take a snapshot of and be able to replay whenever you want. One of those moments for me was sitting in Piazza Michelangelo writing in my journal. Another is watching the Easter celebration unfold in front of the Duomo, in Florence.

In Athens, I was able to volunteer at a refugee camp. The refugees all came from different areas of the Middle East. The refugees were staying on the Port of Pireus. All the families were given a tent; it was humbling to see that everything they owned was in that tent.

Most of the volunteers did not speak Arabic or Farsi. A group of translators, all refugees themselves, helped volunteers communicate with children and adults in the camp. The youngest translator was a boy, about twelve. I was shocked and impressed. I did not believe he was a translator. The boy had every right to be very upset about living in a tent but he decided to be a positive.

The next day, I went back to the camp. A little girl came up to me and gave me her little sister, maybe six months old, and then walked away. I looked around for a parent but did not find one. Once again I was shocked by the situation, the trust that the little girl had in me. Later that day, I was playing with a different young girl, two or three years old, her parents came and took her away. She started crying a little while later and the parents brought her back to me. Being American, I figured that any refugee would not trust me in the camp or around their children. I was surprised when I was accepted by them.

AllisonGrant

Studying abroad was the most life changing and positive experiences of my life. I would go back tomorrow if I could. The culture and different experiences while abroad, have made me a better more conscious citizen. If you have an opportunity to study aboard, even if it might be inconvenient, I strong recommend doing it.

If you too would like to have a life-changing experience, check out the many study abroad opportunities through Eastern.

Speaking of Warrior Welcome…

While the History department appreciates that one of the Warrior Sunday attendees left the department their earbuds, we don’t actually need them. But if you need them back, check with the Department Secretary Brenda Schiavetti (in the main History office).

Warrior Sunday starts off the new academic year

The incoming freshmen and transfer students had a chance to meet with some of the Department of History faculty on Warrior Sunday. Dr. Kirchmann, Chair of of the department, had at hand useful materials about the majors, advising, and opportunities for involvement in the department. Dr. Meznar took expert photos for the blog. Dr. Moore and Dr. Kamola challenged the freshmen to a “place a historical event on the timeline” game. And all received special “HISTORY RULES!” wristbands; we will next work on a secret handshake for all history majors!

Warrior Welcome

Explaining the Major
Working on TimelineWelcome to the History Department!

Another award for History majors!

Congratulations (once again) to History major Talia Erris, whose “Five Feet of Feminine Anarchy: Press Depictions of Emma Goldman From 1892-1901” won Eastern’s 2016 Library Research Award in the Junior/Senior category.

Senior History major Talia Erris (L) and her project advisor, Dr Caitlin Carenen

Senior History major Talia Erris (L) and her project advisor, Dr Caitlin Carenen (R)

Turns out History majors have to use the library after all.

Group photo of Library Research Award winners, faculty and assorted dignitaries

Group photo of Library Research Award winners, faculty and assorted dignitaries

Congratulations and Adieu

This past Monday the History department hosted its annual, year-end Graduating Seniors Reception. There was crab cake, “Chinese pirogies,” and a cake even made a (brief) appearance.

Awards were distributed to our seniors for their hard work and accomplishments, and much merriment was had.

Graduating Senior Awardees

AWARDEES (Left to right, back row):
Michael Lisitano (David M. Roth Scholarship)
Lauren Grenier (Outstanding History/American Studies Major)
Sabreena Croteau (Outstanding History Major)
Emily Komornik (Outstanding History Major)
Sara Dean (Ann and Kenneth Tucker Scholarship)
Richard Astley (Outstanding History/Social Science Major)
Front row:
Melissa Rogers (Student Marshall)
Talia Erris (Outstanding History Major)

 

Other awards given out include those for the year’s best seminar papers:
Talia Erris for “ ‘Five Feet of Feminine Anarchy:’ Press Depictions of Emma Goldman, 1892-1901” (Dr. Carenen, Fall 2015).
Jessica Suplee for “Margaret Randall and Alma Guillermoprieto: Revolutionary Commitment and the Cuban Experience” (Fall 2015, Dr. Meznar).

The awards for the Spring 2016 senior seminars will be announced on the blog in the future.

Congratulations to all, and good luck. And don’t forget to keep in touch!

Now it’s official

On April 6, Sabreena Croteau and Quanece Williams received their Henry Barnard Distinguished Student Awards. They are both dual majors in history and political science, and plan to continue their education in graduate school. Sabreena hopes to study international relations and comparative politics and work in the U.S. Foreign Service as a public diplomacy officer. Quanece will be heading for law school and hopes to become a lawyer representing interests of the underprivileged in our society.

Sabreena Croteau (L) and Quanece Williams (R)

Sabreena Croteau (L) and Quanece Williams (R)

Twelve students from Central, Eastern, Southern, and Western were recognized with Barnard awards. They all gave speeches praising the benefits of their education at the four CSU universities. In their speeches, Sabreena and Quanece thanked the faculty of the History and Political Science departments for their support and inspiration.

We are very proud of Sabreena Croteau and Quanece Williams and wish them great success in their future endeavors!