How I Spent My Summer, By Dr. Bradley Davis

Because we academics don’t actually have three months off in the summer, we have a report of Dr. Davis’ labors during summer “break.”

This summer, Dr. Davis spent several weeks reading materials in the Vietnamese imperial archives, a collection that has only recently become accessible in Hanoi. Over seven weeks, he read the administrative records of the Nguyễn Dynasty, which ruled the entire country of Vietnam from 1802 to 1862, and continued to independently rule the northern and central sections of the country until French colonial rule in the 1880s. Focusing on the period from 1820 to 1847, Dr. Davis compiled materials on ethnic Chinese labor, territorial disputes between Vietnam and other countries, and the legal status of elephants. Together with historians from the Vietnam National University, the Institute of Hán-Nôm Studies, and the École Française d’Extrême-Orient, Dr. Davis has formed an Imperial Archives Research Group, which will develop reference materials for researchers interested in these documents.

While in Hanoi, Dr. Davis also gave a talk (in Vietnamese) on his recent book, Imperial Bandits, to the Institute for Cultural Studies. Two podcast series, from Northern Illinois University and the Australian National University, have published episodes featuring Dr. Davis discussing the book (links below). He also published a chapter in an edited volume – “Between Nation and Ethnos: Genealogies of Dân Tộc in Vietnamese Contexts,” in Regna Darnell and Frederic W. Gleach ed. Histories of Anthropology Annual: Volume 11 – Historicizing Theories, Identities, and Nations. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2017.

He is also really looking forward to the fall!

Bradley Camp Davis, “Imperial Bandits: Outlaws and Rebels in the China-Vietnam Borderlands” (U of Washington Press, 2017)