Jordan Youngblood

Youngblood Profile ImageJordan Youngblood has been an assistant professor in the Eastern English department since the fall of 2014, and is the current department representative to the New Media Studies major. A long-time Southerner, he earned his M.A. from the University of Mississippi in 2010, and his Ph.D from the University of Florida in 2014. His courses focus particularly on intersections of traditional humanities research and emerging digital formats, particularly video games, digital rhetoric, and electronic storytelling. His background and research have a heavy emphasis on queer theory and studies of gender and sexuality, which connect to his pedagogy and organizational work at Eastern. Additionally, he offers courses in science fiction literature & media, literary theory, the overall introduction to English studies at Eastern, and introductory college writing.

Academic Positions
Assistant Professor of English, Eastern Connecticut State University: 2014-present.

Education
Ph.D in English, University of Florida, August 2014.
M.A. in English, University of Mississippi, July 2010.
B.A. in literary studies, University of Texas at Dallas, May 2008.

Academic Interests
Video game studies; digital & emergent media; gender & sexualities studies, especially queer theory and LGBT+ cultures; post-1900 American literature.

Publications
“‘I Wouldn’t Even Know the Real Me Myself’: Queering Failure in Metal Gear Solid 2.” Queer Game Studies. Ed. Adrienne Shaw and Bonnie Ruberg. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2017.

“Climbing the Heterosexual Maze: Catherine and Queering Spatiality in Gaming.” Rated M for Mature: Sex and Sexuality in Gaming. Ed. Matthew Wysecki and Evan Lauteria. New York: Bloomsbury Press, 2015.

 “‘C’mon! Make me a man!’: Persona 4, Digital Bodies, and Queer Potentiality.” Ada: A Journal of Gender, New Media, and Technology. 1.2 (2013): http://adanewmedia.org/2013/06/issue2-youngblood/

Forthcoming Publications
“The Endless End of the World: Queering the Eco-Apocalyptic Narrative of Final Fantasy VI.” Forthcoming in TRACE issue 2: EcoPlay: Digital Games and Environmental Rhetoric (University of Florida, Spring 2017).

“‘Your Life? Your Family? They’re a Fairy Tale, Kid’: Queering Timelines and Reproduction in BioShock.” New Perspectives on BioShock. Ed. Felan Parker and Jessica Aldred. Expected 2018 via McGill-Queen’s University Press.

Academic Presentations
“Gotta Go Past: Speedrunning and the Politics of the Archive.” Panel on “Temporalities of Competition.” Extending Play 3: Time and Temporality in Gaming. Rutgers University. 23-25 September 2016.

“Taking a Queer Picture: Agency, Memory, and Identity in Video Game Photos.” Panel on “Studying Queer Games, Studying Games Queerly.” The Queerness and Games Conference. University of Berkeley. 16-18 October 2015.

“‘Perception without Comprehension is a Dangerous Combination’: Bioshock Infinite and the Act of Playing Pain Aesthetically.” Panel on Digital Deaths and Disenfranchisements: Reading Pleasure, Pain, and Politics in Video Games. American Studies Association Conference. Los Angeles, CA. 6-9 November 2014.

“‘I Know a Clean Boy When I See One’: Wise Blood and the Imagery of Southern Queer Culture.” Flannery O’Connor Society Panel. Southern Atlantic Modern Language Association Conference. Atlanta, GA. 7-10 November 2013.

“Is Metal Gear’s Rectum a Digital Grave?: Queer Trauma and Failure in the Metal Gear Solid Series.” Panel on Queer Failure. The Queerness & Games Conference. University of Berkeley. 24-26 October 2013.

 “I’m in Space: The Portal Series and Queering Digital Mediation.” Mediated Spaces: Ninth Annual Conference of the International Association for the Study of Environment, Space, & Place. University of Florida. 27-28 April 2013.

“‘Home is Where the War Is’: Homefront, Techno-Orientalism, and Queer Racial Borderlands.” Queering Spaces/Queering Borders: 2013 Queer Studies Conference. UNC Asheville. 4-6 April 2013.

“‘You Needn’t Suffer Anymore’: Persona 4, The Digital Body, and Impossible Queer Utopias.” After Queer, After Humanism: Rice English Symposium. Rice University. 14-15 September 2012.

“‘They Had Virtually No Past and Certainly No Future’: Reproductive Futurism and the Cult of the Child in Margaret Atwood’s The Edible Woman.” Mary Isom Center Gender Conference, University of Mississippi. 25 March 2010.