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#1: Five Predictors of Early Literacy

Developed by Dr. Theresa Bouley

This e-clip is a winner of a 2010 Telly Award!

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Description

Early childhood professionals need to know how to support young children's language and early literacy development. In e-clip #1, Dr. Theresa Bouley stresses that best practice in early literacy instruction must involve both spontaneous and planned daily activities focused on the five areas of literacy learning that best predict children's future reading and writing development: oral language, phonemic awareness, alphabet awareness, concepts about print, and early writing with inventive spelling. If preschool teachers know what these five predictors are, they can not only plan daily meaningful lessons in these areas, but they can maximize their ability to catch spontaneous teachable moments throughout the day.

Discussion Questions for Early Childhood Teachers and Administrators

  1. What strategies do we regularly use to support children's oral language acquisition and vocabulary development?
  2. How can we meaningfully integrate phonemic awareness and alphabet awareness activities into daily routines such as book readings or transition times?
  3. How do we help children understand the purpose of letters and how to use them?
  4. What are some ways that we utilize the teachable moments that arise from the environmental print in our center and classrooms? 
  5. What explicit strategies can we use to develop children's understanding of the purpose of writing as well as features and forms of writing?

Recommended Reading

  • Campbell, R. (Ed.) (1998). Facilitating preschool literacy. Newark, DE: International Reading Association.
  • International Reading Association (IRA). (2005). Literacy development in the preschool years: A position statement from the board of directors of the International Reading Association. Newark, DE: Author.
  • Neuman, S., Copple, C., & Bredekamp, S. (2000). Learning to read and write: Developmentally appropriate practices for young children. Washington, D.C: National Association for the Education of Young Children.
  • Neuman, S. & Roskos, K. (Eds.) (1998). Children achieving: Best practices in early literacy. Newark, DE: International Reading Association.Campbell, R. (Ed.) (1998). Facilitating preschool literacy. Newark, DE: International Reading Association.
  • Owocki, G. (1999). Literacy through play. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.
  • Shickedanz, J. (1999). Much more than ABC’s: The early stages of reading and writing. Washington, D.C: National Association for the Education of Young Children.
  • Strickland, D. & Morrow, L.M. eds. (2000). Beginning reading and writing. Newark, DE: International Reading Association.
  • Vukelich, C. & Christie, J. (2009). Building a foundation for preschool literacy: Effective instruction for children’s reading and writing development. Newark, DE: International Reading Association.

Additional Web Resources on Early Literacy

Credits for Five Predictors of Early Literacy

Executive Producer: Julia DeLapp

Producer/Director: Denise Matthews

Production Coordinator: Ken Measimer

Student Production Assistant: Kerin Jaros-Dressler

 

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