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Learning Disability Documentation Criteria
All documentation should include the date of the test(s) and the name, title and professional credentials of the evaluator. The evaluator conducting the battery of tests must be a qualified professional. The following professionals would generally be considered qualified: clinical or educational psychologists, school psychologist, neuropsychologist, learning disability specialist and other professionals who have training and experience in the assessment of learning disabilities. All reports must be typed, no handwritten scores or summaries will be accepted.
  • All documentation should include the date of the test(s) and the name, title and professional credentials of the evaluator. The evaluator conducting the battery of tests must be a qualified professional. The following professionals would generally be considered qualified: clinical or educational psychologists, school psychologist, neuropsychologist, learning disability specialist and other professionals who have training and experience in the assessment of learning disabilities. All reports must be typed, no handwritten scores or summaries will be accepted.
  • An evaluation report should include the summary of a comprehensive diagnostic interview and should include relevant information on the student's academic and/or employment, family and medical history, as well as a discussion of comorbidity if applicable.
  • Psycho-educational assessment is needed to determine the current impact of the disorder on the individual's ability to function in an academic setting.
  • Specific recommendations for accommodations should be provided along with the rationales for each accommodation.
  • Instruments for the diagnostic evaluation should include a comprehensive battery. Documentation should address the following domains:
    • Aptitude
      • A complete intellectual assessment with all subtests and standard scores reported. These tests must include an adult measure. The preferred instrument is the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale – 4th ed. (WAIS-IV). The Woodcock-Johnson III NU: Tests of Cognitive Ability, or the Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scale: 5th edition (SB5), are acceptable instruments. The Slosson Intelligence Test – Revised (SIT-R3) and Kaufman Brief Intelligence Test 2nd ed. (KBIT-2) are primarily a screening measure and therefore are not suitable.
    • Academic Achievement
      • A comprehensive academic achievement battery is essential with all subtests and standard scores for those subtests reported. Current levels of academic functioning in reading (decoding and comprehension), mathematics, oral and written language should be included. Acceptable instruments include the Wechsler Individual Achievement Test, 3rd ed. (WIAT-III). The Wide Range Achievement Test – 4 (WRAT-4) is not a comprehensive measure of achievement and therefore is not suitable as the sole measure of achievement.
    • Information Processing
      • Specific areas of information processing (e.g., short-and long-term memory, sequential memory, auditory and visual perception/processing, processing speed, executive functioning and motor ability) should be assessed. Information from subtests on the WAIS-IV, the Woodcock-Johnson Tests of Cognitive Ability, or the Detroit Tests of Learning Aptitude-Adult (DTLA-A) along with other assessment measures such as non-standard measure and informal assessment procedures or observations may be helpful in determining performance across a variety of domains.
  • In addition to standardized tests it is also very useful to include informal observations of the student during the test administration.
  • Individual “learning styles,” “learning differences,” “academic problems” and “test difficulty and anxiety” in and of themselves do not constitute a learning disability.
  • The documentation must provide clear and concise evidence and identification of a learning disability which is the result of a presumed central nervous system dysfunction, and not resultant from a sensory disability such as visual, auditory, or tactile loss or impairment, other neurological trauma or condition, a psychiatric condition or the consequences of an impoverished or disadvantaged environment.
  • Summary of Performance (SOP), Individualized Education Programs (IEP) and 504 Plans provide helpful information but are insufficient to establish the rationale for accommodations.
   
     
 
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